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Breno de Medeiros
Works at Google
Attended Johns Hopkins University
Lives in Sunnyvale, CA
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Breno de Medeiros

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A convenient way to start with better password management.
Amidst all the big Google I/O news, the company quietly made a major overhaul to Chrome’s password manager. It’s now a part of the revamped Smart Lock service, and if you still haven’t started using a secure app to store your passwords, this one’s for you. All the Important Stuff Google Announced at I/O 2015 All the Important Stuff Google Announced at I/O 2015 All the Important Stuff Google Announced at I/O 20 Today, Google kicked off its I/O con...
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Self-help on moving your users to more secure and modern authentication APIs w/ Google:

https://arvados.org/blogs/30
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Helger Lipmaa is a world-renowned cryptographer. In this post he re-counts how Benedict C. and him were discussing the mathematics of Enigma to ensure the film got it right.
 
[...] You know exactly what I’m talking about. You’ve seen this moment on screen, you’ve seen it on TV, you’ve read it in novels. I find this moment to be extremely condescending to its audience. The moment essentially signals to the viewer that all of that mumbo-jumbo that this smarty pants has been blathering on about, well, we filmmakers do not understand a word of it. Moreover, we don’t care to. And we have no interest in your understanding it either. [...]
My least favorite moment in all of cinema is a relatively common one. You will recognize it, I’m sure, from dozens of mo…
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If you're not paying for the product, you are the product.

I have to admit, this is a catchy line.  It appeals to the inner cynic in us all and makes a certain amount of sense in a core, "what can you do for me," type of thinking.

But it's hog-wash.

I work for Google so I follow the news about the company and I'm really tired of seeing that first line, or some variation of it, spouted by people who really don't care enough to want to think it through.  It does not work that way!

Yes, Google is a company.  And yes, Google is a reasonably large company (though not that large compared to the likes of IBM, GE, etc.).  But though a company is a single entity in the eyes of the law, it is not run like that.  Google is full of many thousands of individuals, many of whom are more rabid about user privacy than the privacy watchdogs that complain.  I've watched them take Larry and Sergey to task on stage about the smallest things.  I've done it twice myself.  If the leaders of the company purposely violated our users' trust, there would be open revolt and the founders would be lucky to not find themselves strung up by their toes.

Everything Google does is done for our users.  Your happiness is always the first priority, even above Ads.  (I've seen this in both policy and various practical implementations.)  You are not product; you are our customers!  That's simply the way we view it and it permeates the company from bottom to top.  Everything is done to make a better service for you.

Even Ads is viewed as a service to our users.  Random ads are garbage.  Useful ads are a benefit.  Yes, it's also a benefit to our publishers and yes, it's also a benefit to our shareholders.  Since when did win-win-win arrangements become a bad thing?

I won't claim that Google always gets it exactly right or that we haven't made mistakes.  We don't and we have.  And we admit it.  And it will happen again.  Sorry.  But everything is done with the right intent even if it doesn't always work out as hoped.  Hindsight is perfect.

Google is the most moral company in which I have ever worked.  But guarding our users' privacy doesn't just make moral sense, it makes business sense.  If we purposefully violated our users' privacy, we wouldn't have a business at all before very long.
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Google SF office does have an amazing view.
(Today with +Breno de Medeiros )
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Smartlock is a collection of Google tools that make it more convenient for everyone to do the right-thing security-wise w/ locking your devices and passwords.

http://get.google.com/smartlock/
Why Smart Lock? Doing all the “right” things to stay safe online has become too much work. Getting past your phone or computer's lockscreen dozens of times each day is painfully interruptive. And even if you manage to remember unique passwords for all your accounts, hackers still might get into ...
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Your login button got too complicated for yourself and your users? GitKit is the easy button for sign-in.

On October 7th you'll have a chance to ask all that you ever wanted to know about GitKit.  Please RSVP if planning to attend:

https://plus.google.com/events/ckao6nl3hgjflasmgk7i87t0mss
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Don't freak out. Purported security flaws in OAuth 2.0 and OpenID are NOT the new Heartbleed.
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I hadn't even heard of this.
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Usability and Security intersect in interesting ways.
 
Over the last year, with +Angelika Moscicki   we set out on a journey to design a new captcha for Google.  

During this journey, we uncovered many unexpected effects and behavior that we summarized into a research paper that Angelika will present next week at CHI. 

One of the strangest effect we encountered, which is the subject of my blog post, is how the meaning of the captcha, deeply influence people perception of its difficulty. Thanks to the insights we garnered, we moved away from letters in favor of digits to ensure people feel the captcha is easy. To know more, read my post or our paper.

Overall I spent 5 years, starting at Stanford, researching captchas security and usability. It feels great to see all of it coming together and making the life of millions of people a little easier.

A big thanks to all the people who did research with us on captcha usability: +Dan Jurafsky +John Mitchell +Steven Bethard +Celine Bursztein 
This is the story of how — and why — Google switched to numeric captchas.
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Have him in circles
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Martin English's profile photo
Howl at the Moon Louisville's profile photo
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Work
Occupation
Software Engineer
Employment
  • Google
    present
  • Google, Inc.
    Software Engineer, present
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Currently
Sunnyvale, CA
Previously
Baltimore, MD - Recife, Brazil - Tallahassee, FL
Story
Introduction
I work with Internet Identity, authentication and authorization protocols and identity infrastructure, from many angles: Design, development, deployment, and security aspects. I enjoy biking, hiking, reading, and watching movies.
Education
  • Johns Hopkins University
    Computer Science
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Male
Kids enjoy watching the bakery operation. Good sandwiches.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
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