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Brendan Tripp
Works at Metaphysical Consulting, Inc.
Attended Lawrence University
Lives in Chicago, IL
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Brendan Tripp

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My review of David Orenstein, Ph.D. & Linda Ford Blaikie, LC.S.W.'s "Godless Grace: How Nonbelievers Are Making the World Safer, Richer and Kinder" ... http://btripp-books.livejournal.com/172436.html
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My review of Diana Schneidman's "Real Skills, Real Income: A Proven Marketing System to Land Well-Paid Freelance and Consulting Work in 30 Days or Less" ... http://btripp-books.livejournal.com/171969.html
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My review of Jeremy Rifkin's "The Zero Marginal Cost Society" ... http://btripp-books.livejournal.com/171323.html
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My review of King Abdullah II of Jordan's "Our Last Best Chance" ... http://btripp-books.livejournal.com/171084.html
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My review of Benjamin Taylor's "Naples Declared: A Walk Around the Bay" ... http://btripp-books.livejournal.com/170906.html
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My review of Brendon Burchard's "The Motivation Manifesto" ... btripp_books: Claiming Your Personal Power ... http://btripp-books.livejournal.com/170268.html
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Brendan Tripp

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My review of Tali Sharot's "The Optimism Bias: A Tour of the Irrationally Positive Brain" ... http://btripp-books.livejournal.com/172064.html
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My review of Robert M. Schoch's "Forgotten Civilization: The Role of Solar Outbursts in Our Past and Future" ... http://btripp-books.livejournal.com/171713.html
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My review of Johnjoe McFadden and Jim Al-Khalili's "Life on the Edge: The Coming of Age of Quantum Biology" ... http://btripp-books.livejournal.com/170590.html
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People
In his circles
358 people
Have him in circles
434 people
Steph Milovic's profile photo
Ana Fernandez's profile photo
Henry Fraenkl's profile photo
mimmo mohamed's profile photo
Genie Desk's profile photo
Dan Furman's profile photo
Christopher Howard's profile photo
Jorge Rivas's profile photo
Tracy Samantha Schmidt's profile photo
Work
Employment
  • Metaphysical Consulting, Inc.
    Principal, 2012 - present
  • HeadsUp Communications, LLC
    CTO, 2012 - 2012
  • Freelance/Consulting
    Freelancer/Consultant, 2009 - 2013
  • Simuality, LLC / Liminati, Inc.
    Director of Communications, 2007 - 2009
  • ClubZ! In-Home Tutoring - Downtown Chicago
    Area Marketing Director, 2004 - 2007
  • Eschaton Productions, Inc.
    President, 1994 - 2004
  • Marian Tripp Communications, Inc.
    Vice President, 1979 - 1993
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Chicago, IL
Previously
New York, NY - Appleton, WI
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Tagline
I'm a "communications" guy!
Introduction
Brendan Tripp grew up in an Advertising/P.R. environment, so frequently describes himself as a “marketing brat”.  He triple-majored in a Liberal Arts program and did some post-grad work in Radio/TV/Film before joining his family's Public Relations firm, where he worked for the likes of Kraft, Uncle Ben's, Quaker, Pace, M&M/Mars and Pillsbury, among other clients.  Aside from regular consumer product publicity, he specialized in conference programs, attaining the sought-after CMP (Certified Meeting Professional) accreditation in the process.

In the '90s he left the agency and founded his own publishing company, and spent the next decade building up his small press to a significant niche player with much critical acclaim. Since then, he's been a Marketing Director for an educational services start-up, Director of Communications for a “metaverse developer” firm, and performed assorted Marketing Communications functions in consulting roles with several companies.

Aside from being a “marketing brat”, Brendan has been a “tech guy” from early on, and was a coin-flip away from going to college for computer science back in the punch-card and paper-tape days (and has since returned to school to study programming and web development). He bought his first computer in 1981 and has been hands-on in cyberspace as the early text-only Internet evolved into the Web and now into exciting new Virtual Worlds and the ever-growing arena of Social Media (where he can generally be found by his on-line moniker @BTRIPP).
Education
  • Lawrence University
    Religion/English/Art, 1976 - 1979
  • Northwestern Univeristy
    Radio/TV/Film, 1978 - 1979
  • The Chubb Institute
    Web Development & Business Programming, 2002 - 2003
  • The Latin School of Chicago
    High School, 1966 - 1975
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Other names
BTRIPP
The newsstand part of the place has been a Six Corners fixture for decades, but they've recently added the Cafe, expanding the appeal. The coffee is designed for maximum choice, as there are multiple beans available in light, medium, an dark roast, and multiple options on how you want to have that made up ... although the default appears to be a top-of-the-counter drip brew, with a filter in a ceramic drip cone. Admittedly, this is not the fastest means of getting one's coffee, but it's high-touch and provides a bit of a show. There are tables inside and a section in front of the store as well. Frankly, there's not much else going in the neighborhood, so they're likely to have a pretty good business going there ... although I can easily imagine it getting to be cutthroat competition for seating!
• • •
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
This is why I go to Chinatown. Sure, I like Dim Sum, and will on rare occasion end up at a "menu" place (although all of my old favorites have, sadly, closed), but the lure of the bakery items at Chiu Quon is always tempting me to hop the Red Line south to Cermak. I am particularly enamored of their BBQ Pork buns and the "sesame balls" with the red bean paste. These are favorites that I can barely stand to NOT buy if I'm in the neighborhood. I've had other "savory" buns as well (I have one Pork Sung bun waiting in the kitchen today for lunch - purchased because they were out of the BBQ when there the other evening), and they've all been at least "good" (if sometimes not quite to this round-eye's palate). The sweet buns (with the singular exception of the VERY addictive sesame balls) are not things that I've indulged much in over the past decade or so, but my kids tell me that they're great ... and the cookies are always a treat. I don't believe we've ever tried their "fancy" (birthday/wedding) cakes, but they have these available by the slice in a number of variations. Also, there's a whole cafe behind the bakery storefront, which is a bit off-putting if you're not Chinese (it's really not set up for ordering in English!), but we've eaten there at least once, and the experience was interesting and the food (I believe we had some sort of noodle soup) was tasty. However, for me, this is all about the pastries. I suppose it's a good thing that it takes a bit of planning/time/effort for me to get there, or I'd be bulking up on my favorite items many times a week, rather than every couple of months!
• • •
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Coming north on the Dan Ryan on the tail end of rush hour, and both the 90/94 side and the LSD side were way backed up, so we decided to swing into Chinatown for dinner instead of fighting through bumper-to-bumper traffic. Our regular Chinatown "go to" place was "closed for remodeling" (I hope that's actually the case), and the back-up we had in mind didn't validate parking (booo!), so we decided to hit Won Kow. We'd hoped they did all-day Dim Sum, but they don't, so we ordered off the menu. It's been YEARS since I'd been to Won Kow (I've got a bum knee and ankle, so those 3 flights of stairs are a challenge), and I don't know if I'd ever actually seen their menu - having only been there for Dim Sum previously. We weren't looking to spend a lot, so opted to go for the "Chef's menu" for 2 - which included wonton soup and appetizer combo (fried shrimp, egg roll, and BBQ rib). We probably wouldn't have ordered the two dishes that came with that, but they were OK. Frankly, what can you expect from a restaurant that still features Chop Suey and Chow Mein these days? The influences of that style of cooking were evident in both the Kung Bao Shrimp, and the combo dish (Won Kow Kow?). Neither were bad, per se, but both had dark sauces without much character. Heck, while there were evidently Chinese hot peppers in the Kung Bao, it had almost NO heat unless you hit one of them. Again, perhaps there are "gems" on their menu, but it may be years again before I end up back there. The meal wasn't bad, and it wasn't particularly expensive (we got out for $33 including tax and tip - just having water and tea), but there wasn't much there to recommend it, other than validating the parking for the main Chinatown lot.
• • •
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
While Buffet Castle is considerably "out of the way" for me, it at least is easily accessed by public transportation, either via the Blue Line Belmont stop, which is right across the street, or via the Belmont bus if one is connecting via the Red Line. I've been coming here for years, every few months when the opportunity presents itself. In this case, I was coming back into the city from The Land Beyond O'Hare on Sunday, and was wanting to avoid the bus transfer around the Blue Line construction at Western, so I got off the el at Belmont, and headed across the street to Buffet Castle. I was a bit miffed to find that on Sunday, they have their dinner prices all day, so this cost more than it usually does ... but that's still pretty cheap, coming in at $10.95 including tax for the all-you-can-eat buffet. There had been some significant changes since the last time I'd been there, including the addition of a dedicated maki station. However, this appears to have come with totally abandoning fish in the maki - they used to have surimi rolls of various types, but this time they had a half a dozen "fancy" rolls but all based on cream cheese and veggies. Not bad for what they were, but they're hardly "sushi" at this point! I have occasionally joked that they have a "Big Boy - you go NOW!" relationship with me there, as the main attraction for me is their peel-and-eat shrimp, with my usually starting out with a heaping plateful of shrimp, followed by maki, followed by whatever might grab my attention on the rest of the buffet. They have gone to head-on shrimp (with a nasty Nautilus-like spike on their head - see pic), which I'm guessing is to make having Vast Quantities more challenging ... but they're well worth the effort. The main part of the buffet features a dozen or so Chinese dishes, various Hispanic dishes (I'm found of the plantains), and assorted "American" dishes (pizza, onion rings, etc.). They have a soup station with four choices, and they have a very nice hot sour soup, that I usually make room for. Obviously, the thrust of a buffet is in variety, and they have a salad line with everything from plain lettuce to spicy octopus, an array of fruit dishes, puddings, pastries (hmmm ... I forgot to get a mini "elephant ear" cookie this time ... dang!), soft serve ice cream, and soda, coffee, and tea. There's no way to sample everything in one trip, but you can be pretty sure that everybody will find something they like there.
• • •
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
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I have to admit that I've never actually gone to Rockit for a meal, but I've been there many, many times for events. Co-owner Billy Dec is very active in the Social Media sphere (he just got an award at the Social Media Club's "Social Media Day" event there), and lots of stuff I end up at happens in their upstairs bar. Due to this, I don't think I've even ever had a chance to eyeball their menu ... so this review is more about Rockit as an event space than as a restaurant (or even as a bar - I'm an old married guy who doesn't drink, so my filters for judging "scenes" are based on contexts many decades old). Two key comments to make about Rockit as an event space ... One - it is less than ideal for staging a "business as usual" speaker/panel presentation. The area typically used for this is up by the windows in the front of the room (although I've seen speakers, such as Scott Stratten, hold forth effectively from the DJ booth on the west wall). There are no particularly good sightlines for that, with most of the crowd (assuming a well-attended event) being at least partially blocked by the centrally-located bar, and those in the back of the room having little chance of seeing the speakers. While this might not sound like a particular impediment, if the subject being discussed from the dais is not "gripping" the crowd, they will quickly lose the room. This happened at Monday's event when the second panel was pretty much drowned out by people chatting amongst themselves throughout the bar. This is something to consider when programming an event there. Two - they will FEED you. I have no idea what their catering/event menu costs, but nearly every event I've been to there has featured enough food to make a major meal out of and then some. At the SMC event they were passing these "hamburger eggroll" things they make (picture an eggroll, filled with ground beef, sliced diagonally, with ketchup topping), macaroni & cheese, big cheeseburger sliders, and what they call "Grapenuts", which are grapes coated in goat cheese and rolled in chopped pistachios on long pointy skewers. At most of the events I've been to, these have kept coming and coming and coming until everybody had more than their fill ... which, given the skimpy "passed hors d'oeuvres" that a lot of places offer, is quite notable. They also have deals on beer and wine, but since I no longer indulge in those, I've nothing to report on the subject except noting that it's at least an option for events (our ticket price at this recent function included two drink coupons for the featured items). Anyway, I've never had a bad time up at Rockit, so I'm guessing the restaurant/bar parts of it (operating outside the context of an event) are similarly enjoyable.
• • •
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
I have to admit, that it's their clam chowder that gets me in the door here. While my wife will order pizzas for pick-up there, I love dropping by at lunch on Fridays to get a bowl of their AWESOME clam chowder. Mind, you, their lunch special (a mini deep dish pizza with a side of soup or salad, and a soda) is a great deal ... but most of the time I'm just there for the soup! Of course, the main thing here is the deep-dish pizza, which is very good ... we usually get sausage ... but it is what it is, and I might prefer some other places' pies (not naming names). They also have some interesting appetizer options like a stuffed spinach bread, or a 3-cheese bread. Having lived in the neighborhood for nearly 40 years, I've seen this space change from a grocery store, to a McDonalds, to a clothing/accessories store, and now to a pizza place. While the decor plays it down, the main room is quite large, but the hanging lighting makes the space feel more like its on a human scale. There are also two open-air dining spaces on either side of the entrance, which are great for when the weather's cooperating.
• • •
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
The other night were were looking for a place to celebrate our younger daughter's graduation from middle school, and were considering going down to Francesca's on Taylor, when I saw they had one up in our neighborhood, and figured we'd go to Francesca's on Chestnut rather than spend $30-40 to cab it down to Little Italy and back! We had to wait nearly a half hour past our reservation to get seated, but I guess that's about par for the course for a popular place on Saturday night. I wish I could recall what other restaurants have been in that space at the Seneca Hotel, as I know I've been in there before. The room is fairly classic, with windows on two sides, and B&W photos from Italy as the main decorative element. I was somewhat surprised that all their locations have the same, fairly limited, menu ... we split some appetizers, the fried calamari (which was as good as we'd read), and the "Quattro Stagione" pizza. I liked this (which comes with prosciutto, artichoke, mushroom, olive, and egg) well enough, but my kids (14 and 18) were kind of grossed out about the egg ... it's one of those things that might have a good reason for being there in a "regional cuisine" sense, but there was no "story" with it to explain why it was there, so it was just odd. We each ordered pasta dishes, and I had the special, Orecchiette with ham and peas in a tomato cream sauce. This was good, but was oddly overpowered with a smoky flavor ... I don't know if this originated with the ham, or something in the sauce, but it was, while not unpleasant, like the egg on the pizza, notable without being expected/explained. Most notable in the "good surprise" column was the very aggressively seasoned olive oil that was served with the bread, having a nice balance of herbs with enough garlic to give it a pronounced edge. I wonder if they bottle that! Anyway, the meal was good, but not so good that we're dying for a return visit. It will definitely be on our radar when looking for "nice" places to eat in the neighborhood, however.
• • •
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago