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Bren Lynne
Works at Vancouver Film School
Lives in Vancouver
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Bren Lynne

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Terrific tutorial for maze generation in Unity, with lots of features.
 
I have written a C# tutorial about random maze generation.
In this tutorial we'll generate a maze with multiple distinct areas and navigate through it.
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Next time!
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books.google.ca - "Side Stories" is an anthology of short stories by game developers.Authors come from both digital and analog game development, computer games to paper games...
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I've read that the prop Electronic Turtle, which the film crew nicknamed "Bruce" after Spielberg's lawyer, failed to function properly on shooting days, which is why it remains off screen.
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“Side Stories: Short Fiction by Game Developers” is an anthology of short stories by game developers.

Authors come from both digital and analog game development, computer games to paper games. Contributors include Greg Costikyan (veteran game designer of Paranoia and Star Wars: The Role-Playing Game), Christopher Mitchell (WGA award for game writing, Deathspank, Simpsons Hit and Run), and Rees Savidis (writer and award winning filmmaker, SSX, Driver: San Francisco), and many others.

A share of proceeds will be donated to the Child’s Play charity.
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Galactic Pyrotechnics on Display: NGC 4258 (M106) | NASA Chandra
A galaxy about 23 million light years away is the site of impressive, ongoing, fireworks. Rather than paper, powder, and fire, this galactic light show involves a giant black hole, shock waves, and vast reservoirs of gas.

This galactic fireworks display is taking place in NGC 4258 (also known as M106), a spiral galaxy like the Milky Way. This galaxy is famous, however, for something that our Galaxy doesn't have - two extra spiral arms that glow in X-ray, optical, and radio light. These features, or anomalous arms, are not aligned with the plane of the galaxy, but instead intersect with it.

The anomalous arms are seen in this new composite image of NGC 4258, where X-rays from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory are blue, radio data from the NSF's Karl Jansky Very Large Array are purple, optical data from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope are yellow and blue, and infrared data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope are red.

A new study of these anomalous arms made with Spitzer shows that shock waves, similar to sonic booms from supersonic planes, are heating large amounts of gas - equivalent to about 10 million Suns. What is generating these shock waves? Radio data shows that the supermassive black hole at the center of NGC 4258 is producing powerful jets of high-energy particles. Researchers think that these jets strike the disk of the galaxy and generate shock waves. These shock waves, in turn, heat some of the gas - composed mainly of hydrogen molecules - to thousands of degrees. As shown in our additional, composite image, part of the evidence for this heating process comes from the similarity in location between the hydrogen and X-ray emission, both thought to be caused by shocks, and the radio jets.

The Chandra X-ray image reveals huge bubbles of hot gas above and below the plane of the galaxy. These bubbles indicate that much of the gas that was originally in the disk of the galaxy has been heated to millions of degrees and ejected into the outer regions by the jets from the black hole.

The ejection of gas from the disk by the jets has important implications for the fate of this galaxy. Researchers estimate that all of the remaining gas will be ejected within the next 300 million years - very soon on cosmic time scales - unless it is somehow replenished. Because most of the gas in the disk has already been ejected, less gas is available for new stars to form. Indeed, the researchers used Spitzer data to estimate that stars are forming in the central regions of NGC 4258, at a rate which is about ten times less than in the Milky Way Galaxy.

The European Space Agency's Herschel Space Observatory was used to confirm the estimate from Spitzer data of the low star formation rate in the central regions of NGC 4258. Herschel was also used to make an independent estimate of how much gas remains in the center of the galaxy. After allowing for the large boost in infrared emission caused by the shocks, the researchers found that the gas mass is ten times smaller than had been previously estimated.

Because NGC 4258 is relatively close to Earth, astronomers can study how this black hole is affecting its galaxy in great detail. The supermassive black hole at the center of NGC 4258 is about ten times larger than the one in the Milky Way, and is also consuming material at a faster rate, potentially increasing its impact on the evolution of its host galaxy.

These results were published in the June 20th, 2014 issue of The Astrophysical Journal Letters and are available online. The authors are Patrick Ogle, Lauranne Lanz and Philip Appleton from the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, CA.

NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Mass., controls Chandra's science and flight operations.

Image Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/Caltech/P.Ogle et al;
Optical: NASA/STScI; IR: NASA/JPL-Caltech; Radio: NSF/NRAO/VLA

+NASA's Marshall Center 
+NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory 
+NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory 
+Spitzer Space Telescope 
+National Science Foundation 
+European Space Agency, ESA 

#NASA   #Space  #Astronomy #Galaxy #Spiral #BlackHole #Chandra #NGC4258   #M106  #Xray #Radio #Optical #Observatory #Spitzer
#Telescope #Astrophysics #Science #Cosmos #Universe #Art
#Photography #ESA #Herschel
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Car stunt goes horribly wrong. The driver walks away.

GoPro cameras, plus what looks to me like an iPhone mounted to the dash, capture a super gnarly car crash that happened when a record-breaking jump ends with a bad landing. 
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Hey sound guy, your boom is in the shot.
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Have him in circles
193 people
joon hasen's profile photo
Guido Augusto Faria Pereira's profile photo
Judy Rivers's profile photo
sparrow ma's profile photo
Carlo Sunseri's profile photo
Julio Sousa's profile photo
Lea Hayes's profile photo
Bryan Post's profile photo
Michael Seamark's profile photo
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    Game Design Instructor, 2010 - present
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