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Branimir Dolički
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Attended University of Zagreb
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Branimir Dolički

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Damals wurde niemand verhaftet, heute auch nicht.
Nicht nur die Justiz scheint auf dem rechten Auge blind, auch die Exekutive und Legislative.
Oder sie nehmen es billigend in Kauf.
Weiß nicht, was schlimmer ist.

Lesenswerter Artikel über Heidenau:
http://www.tagesspiegel.de/politik/heidenau-randale-gegen-fluechtlinge-polizei-greift-durch-auch-gegen-die-antifa/12222388.html
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"Wenn man also nicht der Meinung ist, dass alle Flüchtlinge Schmarotzer sind, die verjagt, verbrannt oder vergast werden sollten, dann sollte man das ganz deutlich kund tun. Dagegen halten. Mund aufmachen. Haltung zeigen."

Hätte ja nicht gedacht, dass ich mal einen dieser meist langweiligen und sehr staatstragenden Kommentare in der Tagesschau teilen und ihm applaudieren würde. Aber Anja Reschke trifft den Punkt - und verfällt nicht in den allzu gern genommenen Ausweg, nach Sperren und schärferen Gesetzen gegen "das Internet" zu rufen.

http://www.tagesschau.de/inland/kommentar-fluechtlinge-101.html
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Terror in Deutschland. Nazi-Terror.
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Die Zahl der Angriffe auf Asylunterkünfte steigt enorm an. Politiker und Journalisten sind mitverantwortlich für die Eskalation der Gewalt: Sie haben Ressentiments gegen Flüchtlinge allzu oft befeuert. Ein Kommentar von Maximilian Popp.
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Die Zahl der Angriffe auf Asylunterkünfte steigt enorm an. Politiker und Journalisten sind mitverantwortlich für die Eskalation der Gewalt: Sie haben Ressentiments gegen Flüchtlinge allzu oft befeuert.
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Wow. Can't wait for higher resolutions and HD movies.
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Kinesin is a protein that moves things around the cell. That filament is a protein strand that gives the cell structure. That vesicle is a big blob full of cellular product that the cell wants to transport somewhere else. It is driven by ATP hydrolysis.

#Biology   #GIFs   #ScienceEveryday  

via: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y-uuk4Pr2i8
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You do realize that the fossil record does show the wheel being reinvented many, many times. You are right about me though.
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With blackjack and hookers?
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That sums it up very nicely.
 
Irresponsible or unavoidable borrowing?

Growing up in Europe, I didn't pay much attention to the construction of the Euro, and whatever little I remember has nothing to do with the economics of it. Now, older, having lived in the US for a while, with a Greek wife, I'm looking at the way the Euro is unraveling and I've been using the opportunity to try to figure out how it works (or, rather, why it doesn't).

The core mechanism that allows multiple states to share the same currency is pretty simple: since the weaker states can't devalue their currency to compensate for their trade deficit with the stronger ones, money has to flow from the stronger economies to the weaker ones in order to maintain the balance.

We see that in the US: as measured in GDP per capita, there's about a 2:1 ratio between the strongest states and the weakest ones. To compensate for that, a lot of money flows between states, through the federal government. Most taxes in the US are federal taxes, i.e. about 75%, and the federal government doesn't necessarily spend the money it collects in the exact states where it collects them. As an example, every year about 130 billion dollars paid by California in federal taxes don't make it back into California. Texas and New York are the two other states that have a negative balance of more than 100 billion each. For those 3 states, that outflow on money represents 5.7%, 7.2% and 7.4% of their respective GDPs. California is literally sending money to other states so that those states can buy California stuff. The same is true for Texas, New York, and about 20 of the 50 states that are sending money to the other 30.

Looking back in history, the Marshall Plan followed a somewhat similar logic: the US sent aid to Europe, to allow Europeans to buy US goods, which was both a stabilizing mechanism for European currencies that otherwise were in a devaluation spiral, and an outlet for the huge US industrial production. For reference, the Marshall Plan amounted to 120 billion dollars (in today's dollars) over 4 years, which is tiny compared to the amount of money that the federal government now redistributes across state lines.

We can compare that to the situation in the Eurozone/EU, where the GDP per capita varies by a factor of about 2.3:1. Germany's balance in the EU budget is negative by less than 9 billion Euros. France's and Italy's follow at approximately 6.5 billion and 6 billion. Germany's 9 billion Euros is tiny compared to California's 130 billion dollars, especially since Germany's GDP is 60% larger than that of California. Since the US and EU economies have approximately the same size, that's a reasonably apples-to-apples comparison. The biggest negative balance that a Eurozone country has with the EU is about 0.41% of its GDP. The biggest positive balance is 1.3%. Within the US, only 4 states out of 50 fall within that range.

That's the problem right there: Germany is not flowing enough money out to other Eurozone countries to compensate for its own very strong economy. That's true of other rich European countries as well, e.g. Netherlands, Austria, France.

From the Greek point of view, the only way to get that money to flow in order to maintain balance had been for the government to borrow. That wasn't irresponsible borrowing. That was mechanical, predictable. Greece's poor historical discipline around government finances only accelerated an unavoidable process, but it's not a root cause.

In fact, predictably, pushing Greece into austerity made things worse, much worse: with the root cause being Greece's relatively weak economy compared to the rest of the Eurozone, an austerity approach can only put Greece in a position where it needs even more money to flow in in order to maintain balance.

Even if we assume that all of Greece's debts get somehow forgiven with no further constraints and that Greece manages to run a balanced government budget, it would still be in an unsustainable position in the current Eurozone as its weaker economy would force additional money to flow in. Unless the Eurozone very significantly increases the amount of money that it redistributes across borders, Greece should get out of the Euro at the first opportunity, i.e. literally Monday morning, July 6.

Worse, with Greece out, it's only a matter of time for another weak country to find itself in the same position: that might be Portugal, Spain, Italy, or if Bulgaria, Romania or even Hungary join quickly enough that might go through that same death spiral quickly enough to see the Eurozone as a revolving door, with barely enough time to come in before being back out.

Once that first batch of weak countries is out, there'll always be more that'll be at the bottom of the scale and will find themselves in the same position. France is comfortably in the middle of the pack within Europe today, but attrition will eventually push it toward the bottom, and France having to leave the Euro is a true nightmare scenario for everyone.

In order for the Eurozone to survive, its rich members will need to send a lot more money to the poorer ones: the rich ones literally can't continue reaping benefits from a currency based on the European average without sharing those benefits with the poorer ones that bring that European average down. Otherwise, the Euro will consume country after country until it hits a country that is literally too big to fail.
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Hey +Martin Probst - I researched a bit and found this article: http://mainlymacro.blogspot.de/2015/02/greece-simple-macroeconomic-guide.html

Apparently, there is a significant difference between the two ways of doing the adjustment, and it has to do with how quickly it can be done. In both cases you get a slump in GDP but if you have to do it within a monetary union you get a collapse instead of mere temporary slump. This is exactly what we saw happen in Greece since 2010 (they DID in fact massively reduce spending and salaries since then, that exactly is the problem).

Now, when you have a true political union (like the US) you can prevent the disaster by outright cash transfer (like in Texas in 1987 http://krugman.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/06/17/what-a-real-external-bank-bailout-looks-like/ ). Eurozone is the worst of both worlds.
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Okay, show of hands, will Greece still be in Eurozone one year from now?
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60%
No
40%
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Additionally, if eurozone countries can't count on their eurozone allies, then why would they consider trusting them when they drop down to a weaker from of alliance?
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Nice week, America! Keep the momentum!
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Did you forget equal pay for more expensive workers and taking away states' rights?

Most of your agenda is agreeable, but a few ask for too much compromise.
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Warum kann Griechenland nicht einfach seinen Schuldenschnitt bekommen? Jeder Privatmann und jede Firma kann heute Insolvenz beantragen, aber Griechenland wird dieser Schritt verwehrt? 

Es ist doch sonnenklar, dass sich hier einige Leute einfach nur immens verzockt haben. Dazu kommt, dass ein großer Teil der griechischen Schulden einzig und allein deshalb existieren, weil damals unbedingt die "systemkritischen" Banken gerettet werden mussten. Der einfache Bürger in Griechenland soll jetzt also die Suppe auslöffeln, die ihm die sogenannte Elite eingebrockt hat? Mir platzt bei sowas echt beinahe der Kragen.

Den Status quo um jeden Preis erhalten, das scheint die politische Maxime in der EU zu sein heut zu Tage. Aber: Das Geld ist so oder so weg, egal ob Griechenland in der Eurozone bleibt oder nicht. Die Frage ist, wieviel schlimmer kommt es dort noch für den "normalen" Bürger? Die, die etwas größeres in Sicherheit zu bringen hatten haben das nämlich vermutlich längst getan...

#greece     #eurocrisis  
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Griechenlands Gläubiger bieten eine Verlängerung des Hilfsprogramms an. Doch Athen sagt Nein.
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Branimir Dolicki
Popcorn das man gar nicht essen kann weil vermutlich 2 Tage alt. Für 5.50 Euro.
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Best Falafel in town.
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Lovely sunny room. Friendly personnel. Fabulous food. Good value.
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Extremely fresh and tasty vegetables, falafel, and other food. Super friendly staff. Both thumbs up!
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Excellent real American cocktail bar
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