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Brandon “Innomen” Sergent
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Last month, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention admitted that it had “significantly inflated” the number of deaths linked to prescription opioids in 2016.

Rather than the 32,445 overdose deaths attributed to prescription opioids in 2016, they concluded that it was 17,087. The error resulted from prescription opioid-involved deaths being tallied with deaths resulting from illegally manufactured fentanyl.

The CDC is now taking a more conservative approach, the researchers said in a paper published in the American Journal of Public Health. That new approach will “better differentiate deaths involving prescription (pharmaceutically manufactured) opioids from deaths involving illicit opioids (heroin and illegally manufactured fentanyl).”

What the death panel’s report highlights the complicated lives that most overdose victims have led. Eighty per cent were regular users of illicit drugs and 81 per cent were men. Two-thirds had spent time in jail. Most had more than one drug in their systems when they died. Most died alone at home. More than half had recently spent time in emergency. Many have tried and failed to kick their habit, which only made them more vulnerable to overdosing on opiates when they relapsed.

This is all valuable information on which to base public policy decisions about how best to deal with the ongoing crisis.
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"As we’ve reported before, it is bullshit and illegal under federal law for electronics manufacturers to put “Warranty Void if Removed” stickers on their gadgets, and it’s also illegal for companies to void your warranty if you fix your device yourself or via a third party.

The Federal Trade Commission put six companies on notice today, telling them in a warning letter [ https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/press-releases/2018/04/ftc-staff-warns-companies-it-illegal-condition-warranty-coverage ] that their warranty practices violate federal law. If you buy a car with a warranty, take it a repair shop to fix it, then have to return the car to the manufacturer, the car company isn’t legally allowed to deny the return because you took your car to another shop. The same is true of any consumer device that costs more than $15, though many manufacturers want you to think otherwise.
[...]
"The letters warn that FTC staff has concerns about the companies’ statements that consumers must use specified parts or service providers to keep their warranties intact," the FTC wrote in a press release. "Unless warrantors provide the parts or services for free or receive a waiver from the FTC, such statements generally are prohibited by the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act, a law that governs consumer product warranties. Similarly, such statements may be deceptive under the FTC Act."

The FTC hasn’t said which six companies it sent letters to, just that they “market and sell automobiles, cellular devices, and video gaming systems in the United States.” When we originally wrote about the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act, which prohibits the “tying” of a consumer good to a certain type of replacement part, several people suggested that maybe consumer electronics companies weren’t covered under the law. With Tuesday’s action, the FTC has made clear that all consumer electronics that cost more than $15 are covered."
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"At this point, Western accusers don’t seem to care how blatantly unfounded, if not ludicrous, an accusation is. The presumption of Russian guilt, along with the shaming of anyone who questions it, has become an unquestionable standard of Western/American political and media discourse."

h/t +Adrianna Wanderer

I'm so tired of gplus not having something like retweet. It rewards speed (or theft) over content quality. First to share/steal wins. It punishes quality and fair play. This is why gplus is basically a dead social network.
This one from Jim Kavanagh is long, but well worth a read, be prepared to ask yourselves some real serious questions! You need to be comfortable with your answers!
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One of the many reasons we need to completely rethink the entire concept of "intellectual property." Vendor locking should be illegal. Number portability is already law. We need a social media Internet online equivalent.

I gave up facebook and basically lost access to 90% of the people from my past. Though luckily for me that's no great loss. Still, boycotting one platform doesn't ensure the next will be any better. These places should be public and handled as such.

We're eventually going to have to choose, profit or people.
"But I can’t help but wonder if only privileged people can afford to take a position of social media puritanism. For many, particularly people from marginalised groups, social media is a lifeline – a bridge to a new community, a route to employment, a way to tackle isolation."
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This is actually quite revealing. The core difference between the two factions of humanity is either an axiomatic rejection or embrace of pain and death.

If you axiomatically reject pain and death you'll end up here logically:

http://underlore.com/the-apex/

However, if you axiomatically (as in dogmatically, or from a faith based premise) conclude that death and pain are acceptable, even defensible for any reason, then yes the day he was tortured to death was literally good.

These two factions can never agree. There will be a war of some sort eventually. The illusion of peace right now is largely maintained by the lead the death side was born into.

Right now everyone has no choice but to suffer and die. The only oppositions possible right now are gambles and reductions. We can't yet solve the technical problems of pain and death, but once we do the death worshipers will finally have to make a choice. And some will choose on axiomatic grounds to defend death and pain violently. This choice will be simultaneously, honest, elegant, and ironic.

Sidenote: This is why Crusades and ISIS are not aberrations, but rather pure expressions. Even the most peaceful of religions (Jainism, versions of Buddhism, etc) will have to deal with a technical cure for suffering and the real deletion of a default human expiration date.
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"Freedom" is a meaningless empty concept when we all have to wrap our entire lives around pleasing a corporation sufficiently that they provide all our needs via wage.

Slavery never ended, they just realized it was already everywhere in the form of de facto compulsory employment.

Like Bill Hicks said: "If you think you're free, try going somewhere without money."
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“SSA’s legacy IT systems are increasingly difficult and expensive to maintain… SSA reported re-hiring retired employees to maintain its systems that include many programs written in Common Business Oriented Language (COBOL). We highlighted a group of systems for determining retirement benefits eligibility and amounts which were over 30 years old, with some written in COBOL… a programming language developed in the late 1950s and early 1960s.”
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Part of the investigation will focus on the role played by the opioid guidelines released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2016, which discourage doctors from prescribing opioids for chronic pain. Although voluntary and intended only for family practice physicians, the CDC guidelines have been widely adopted as mandatory rules by other federal agencies, states and insurers.

The impact of the guidelines was sudden and powerful. Within a year of their release, a PNN survey of over 3,100 pain patients found that 71 percent had their opioid medication stopped or reduced. Nearly 85% said their pain and quality of life were worse.

“The CDC clearly knows what's going on and they haven’t taken any real action to say, ‘That is not appropriate, involuntarily forcing people off their medications. That’s not what we recommended,'" Lohman said. “When a government puts in place regulations that make it almost impossible for a physician to prescribe an essential medication, or for a pharmacist to stock the medication, or for a patient to fill their prescriptions, that becomes a human rights issue.”

https://www.painnewsnetwork.org/stories/2018/3/15/human-rights-watch-investigating-treatment-of-pain-patients

The article comments are insightful, as well.
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