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Brandon Golway
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I'm Awesome.
I'm Awesome.

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Neat but kinda pricey: "The idea seems neat, but offloading your gameplay to the cloud isn't cheap: NVIDIA says GeForce Now will charge $25 for 20 hours of play, and that doesn't include the cost of the games. If you only played two hours a day, you'd spend $912 for a year of NVIDIA GeForce Now gaming." That's still cheaper than building a gaming rig, which can cost $1,500-$2,000. The video card I just got (GTX 1070) is $450 so depending on what GPUs they use in their servers it could be great for people with no space or lack hundreds or thousands to upgrade their PC and would rather spend less than $50 for a multi-hour gaming session.
NVIDIA brings GeForce Now cloud gaming to PCs Mac and low-end PC users can now play high end games over the cloud. Ever wanted to be a PC gamer, but didn't want to buy a gaming PC? NVIDIA's Jen-Hsun Haung wants your number. Taking the stage at CES today, NVIDIA's CEO announced GeForce Now for PC and Mac -- an offshoot of its cloud gaming service aimed at prospective PC gamers. Despite sharing the same name as the streaming service it offers to NVIDIA Shield users, GeForce Now for PC isn't a gaming subscription service. It's a server /rental/ program. Users of GeForce Now for PC won't load up a streaming app and pick through a list of games -- they'll load up Steam, Origin, UPlay or other PC game providers and purchase games directly from the distributor. Then they'll run that game on NVIDIA's GRID servers through GeForce Now for an hourly fee. The result is a setup that, in the stage demo, looks remarkably like running games on a local machine. The idea seems neat, but offloading your gameplay to the cloud isn't cheap: NVIDIA says GeForce Now will charge $25 for 20 hours of play, and that doesn't include the cost of the games. If you only played two hours a day, you'd spend $912 for a year of NVIDIA GeForce Now gaming. Still, if you really don't want to buy a gaming machine with that cash, GeForce Now for PC and Mac will start rolling out in March.
NVIDIA brings GeForce Now cloud gaming to PCs Mac and low-end PC users can now play high end games over the cloud.  Ever wanted to be a PC gamer, but didn't want to buy a gaming PC? NVIDIA's Jen-Hsun Haung wants your number. Taking the stage at CES today, NVIDIA's CEO announced GeForce Now for PC and Mac -- an offshoot of its cloud gaming service aimed at prospective PC gamers. Despite sharing the same name as the streaming service it offers to NVIDIA Shield users, GeForce Now for PC isn't a gaming subscription service. It's a server /rental/ program.   Users of GeForce Now for PC won't load up a streaming app and pick through a list of games -- they'll load up Steam, Origin, UPlay or other PC game providers and purchase games directly from the distributor. Then they'll run that game on NVIDIA's GRID servers through GeForce Now for an hourly fee. The result is a setup that, in the stage demo, looks remarkably like running games on a local machine.   The idea seems neat, but offloading your gameplay to the cloud isn't cheap: NVIDIA says GeForce Now will charge $25 for 20 hours of play, and that doesn't include the cost of the games. If you only played two hours a day, you'd spend $912 for a year of NVIDIA GeForce Now gaming. Still, if you really don't want to buy a gaming machine with that cash, GeForce Now for PC and Mac will start rolling out in March.
engadget.com

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Solstice seasoning for your sole
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"How dare you help us fix security issues in our software?!? We'll sue the hell out of you rather than fix our horrible security problems and continue to let people hack our systems!"

WTF is wrong with these companies?! They seriously must be run by a bunch of old idiots who don't know a damn thing about technology nor give a damn about it. This is analogous to someone saying "hey you left your door unlocked" and you threatening to arrest them for it.

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My experience using both over the past decade and my search to finally integrate both of them.

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There you have it people, religion is a Pavlovian response, no different than drugs or gambling.

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I've been using an Arch VM on my windows 10 PC to do programming and various other things, and decided to fully give the whole "Ubuntu in Windows" thing a spin since I had it installed before but never really used it. All I needed was VIM, Python 2.7 and git. They were already installed and I got to using them. I felt mostly at home, except for the fact that I couldn't have multiple tabs in my terminal (command window). After about an hour of using it I ran into Python's famous whitespace error: everything was perfectly indented and I went to create a new line and it told me that there was an unexpected indent. Even though the whole thing was written in Linux and I was using the Linux subsystem, it was apparently still using Windows newlines. Shortly after that I booted up my Linux VM and got back to work.
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