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Boris Borcic
Attends and plants delegated
Lives in voting to animals
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Boris Borcic

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17. Morality works partly like grammar. Both evolved for social survival. We’re born into both unchosen. In both we instinctively, unconsciously, feel what’s “right” (System 1 + “moral dumbfounding”).

18. Morality’s behavioral rules and language’s grammar rules are in a sense unchoosable. They’re tacit and collective, hence change slowly, and communally, not individually, often intergenerationally.
Words don't work like we were taught. That old neat nouns and verbs type tale hides the weird truth. Language is a mix of flux and fixed but flexible elements that relies on "unknown knowns."
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Ngô Bảo Châu: “The Riemann zeta function and its generalizations”
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Heisuke Hironaka: “Resolution of Singularities in Algebraic Geometry”
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One of the coolest science stories of the year.

via +Andres Soolo
Scientists have come up with a solution that will reduce the number of lions being shot by farmers in Africa - painting eyes on the butts of cows.
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How the Brain Decodes Sentences

our computer model could predict the brain patterns for a new sentence that it had not been trained on, as long as it had been trained on enough of the words in that sentence in different contexts. For example, our model could predict the brain pattern for "The family played at the beach," using the patterns that it had been trained on for other sentences sharing some of the same words, such as "The young girl played soccer" and "The beach was empty.”
New research advances neuroscientists' understanding of the complexities of language processing
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You may certainly "say so". Boris.
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Was it not Aleppo soap that Pontius Pilate used to wash his hands?
UN chief Ban Ki-moon is "appalled by the chilling military escalation" in the war-torn Syrian city of Aleppo, with the UN Security Council due to meet.
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Michael Atiyah: “The Soluble and the Insoluble”
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Artificial sweeteners hit sour note with sketchy science

University of Sydney researchers have confirmed widespread bias in industry-funded research into artificial sweeteners, which is potentially misleading millions by overstating their health benefits. In the same week that the sugar industry came under fire for influencing the integrity of scientific research, this new comprehensive review of artificial sweetener studies reveals that reviews funded by artificial sweetener companies were nearly 17 times more likely to have favourable results. The review, published in the latest edition of PLOS ONE journal, analysed 31 studies into artificial sweeteners between 1978 and 2014. The reviews considered both the potentially beneficial effects of artificial sweeteners, such as weight loss, as well as harmful effects like diabetes. "It's alarming to see how much power the artificial sweetener industry has over the results of its funded research, with not only the data but also the conclusions of these studies emphasising artificial sweeteners' positive effects while neglecting mention of any drawbacks," said co-author Professor Lisa Bero, head of the Charles Perkins Centre's bias node.
University of Sydney researchers have confirmed widespread bias in industry-funded research into artificial sweeteners, which is potentially misleading millions by overstating their health benefits.
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Money left free to pilot values where it would does this; elects a select few to experience disproportionate satisfaction of an appetite for it that it obtains of most by starving them in favor of the few it finds most deserving.

"In God we Trust" on dollar bills is either an atheistic slogan, or blasphemous if it means what's illustrated in practice, that money is to be trusted like it was God to spontaneously drive things for the better.
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I do think +Cong Ma was sarcastic.
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Here, Giuseppe Penone has flensed away the yearly growth layers - what come out as tree rings when you cut through the whole bole, revealing the tree that was. The Rijksmuseum grounds are rife with his stuff, which is not all like this!
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I go to the Rijksmuseum to see the Rembrandts. What a snob, I am!
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voting to animals
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Geneva
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in the beginning, animals voted
Introduction
Born a twin and somewhat later, first distracted of girls by computers with ram capacity in the kilobytes range; that is, truly parsimonious computers.

Former Taglines

Dark energy is relic pollution from warp drives! Solve two cosmic mysteries - the Fermi Paradox and Dark Energy - by each other. Transpose the AGW issue to the Universe, to defuse the illusion we can turn our back on the problem by moving to exoplanets. Make fun of Dark Energy etc having inspired the possibility of warp drives, by assuming cosmic history has already articulated both together, but in reverse order.

Does God Sexist? - The misogyny of many religious texts and traditions, entangles the matter of affirming God with that of affirming misogyny.

Ambiguities are like microbes: the pathogens steal attention! - most people will equate microbes with the tiny fraction of pathogens, and will ignore in particular the helpful microbes without which we wouldn't even survive. I claim a similar situation applies to ambiguities, even more remote from awareness.
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