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Bob Flisser
Software trainer, web and multimedia developer, published author, science geek.
Software trainer, web and multimedia developer, published author, science geek.
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A new #Windows10 update fixes a zero-day vulnerability to a massive, global ransomware attack that uses leaked NSA code.

http://www.cnbc.com/2017/05/12/microsoft-responds-to-global-hacking-cyberattack.html #security

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If you haven’t used Excel’s People Graph add-in yet, you’ll like it if you need to show a quantity of people or a handful of other objects for any reason. It’s part of a recent update of #Excel 2016 for both Windows and Mac. Here’s an example:

Let’s say we have a list of the populations of northeastern US states. Click anywhere in the list. On the ribbon bar, go to the Insert tab, then in the Add-ins group, click People Graph. (If your Excel screen is narrow, Add-ins may be a drop-down you have to click, first.)

This puts a sample graph on the worksheet. Click it or roll your mouse over the upper-right corner, and you’ll see a couple of buttons. Click the grid-like button. In the pop-up screen, type a title for the chart, then click Select Your Data. In this example, we’ll select the whole range, from A1 through B10, including the column headers.

Click the green Create button, and you’re done! You may see a message telling you to stretch out the chart so you can see all the data. If necessary, you can zoom out on the page.

If you click the gear button in the upper-right corner, you’ll see options that let you choose the overall format of the chart, how the figure will look, and what shape you get – a person figure, cat, dolphin, diamond, and a few more. Unfortunately, there isn’t an option to use a custom shape.

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+Apple announced it's buying +SpaceX for $20 billion. Tim Cook says Elon Musk will be the Vice President of iSpace operations and Teslas will have built-in iPhones. #space #Tesla
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LOL, I know how he feels.

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#Google CEO Sundar Pichai said the company recalled "at least" 187 overseas employees back to the US in response to #Trump's immigration executive order.

http://on.wsj.com/2keeOxm

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Use #Excel to Run an Office Pool

This time of year, some people's thoughts turn to major sporting events..... and wagering on them. Because of trademark restrictions, I won't name any specific one, but some people race owls, so I'll use a hypothetical "Superb Owl" competition, which gets played in 4 quarters.

This brings us to Microsoft Excel and the worksheet you can download for free at http://bit.ly/2kkEclh. Feel free to edit the sheet to insert the teams of your choice. Let's say the two teams are the Barred Owls from the National Flying Conference, and the Snowy Owls, from the American Flying Conference. As your coworkers place their wagers (you enter the cost of a wager in P8), enter their names into the grid of 100 squares, with each box indicating a possible score. So F10 would be a score of 7-3, with the Nationals leading. If the score is in the double digits, we use just the second digit.

Down columns O and P, enter the score at the end of each quarter. Using a horrific, mind-bending formula that mashes up the INDEX, MATCH, VALUE, IF, LEN and RIGHT functions, column R determines who won at the end of each quarter. Since people can buy more than one square, you can add up their wins and losses down column Q.

Of course this is just for fun and not to encourage gambling. Check your local laws for what is or isn't permissible. And may the best owls win!

To get up to speed quickly in Excel, check out Excel 2016 Formulas and Functions in 90 Minutes at https://www.udemy.com/excel90min/.
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If you round numbers in #Excel using the Increase Decimal or Decrease Decimal buttons on the Home tab of the ribbon bar, Excel still does its calculations on the full number. Those two buttons are only formatting, and the full number can rear its head elsewhere on the sheet. If you want to really round numbers, use the ROUND function. Its syntax is:
=ROUND(number to be rounded, number of decimal points)

You can also force a number to be rounded up or rounded down regardless of its natural value using the ROUNDUP and ROUNDDOWN functions, which use the same syntax. And if you place a minus sign before the second argument, Excel will round to the nearest 10 value. Below are some examples, rounding the formula of =97/13.

To learn more formulas and functions in Excel 2016, check out my course:
www.udemy.com/excel90min

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How to use #Excel to calculate when #Thanksgiving falls on any year: it falls on the 4th Thursday in November, so we find what day of the week November 1st is, then add enough days. We do this by nesting the Date, Weekday and Choose functions. This year, November 1st was a Tuesday, so Thanksgiving is the 24th.

Put the year (2016) in A2, then enter this formula in any cell:

=DATE(A2,11,CHOOSE(WEEKDAY(DATE(A2,11,1)),26,25,24,23,22,28,27))

We can even create a table. Enter some years down a column, then in an adjacent column, AutoFill this formula down the column.
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LMAO

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Take pictures that have a depth of field using your #iPhone 7 Plus with iOS 10.

http://flisser.com/take-pictures-with-depth-of-field-in-ios-10/
#photography #iOS10
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