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BiologicVET
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Dog and Cat health Supplements to Support and Maintain Health and Wellness
Dog and Cat health Supplements to Support and Maintain Health and Wellness

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Did you know the foundation of each BiologicVET powder formula is a prebiotic, lignan-rich blend of GMO-free certified organic defatted flax, sunflower and sesame seed meal, which supports healthy immune and metabolic function.

Lignans are both antioxidants and phytoestrogens. Antioxidants are compounds that work to keep oxygen from reacting with and damaging proteins, fats, and other compounds in our tissues. Phytoestrogens are compounds found in plants that can have estrogen activity in animals and humans.

The main lignan in flax is called SDG and is converted by the bacteria in the dog’s gut to the lignans found in the animal — enterodiol and enterlactone. Lignans protect against cancer by blocking certain enzymes involved in hormone metabolism and interfering with the growth and spread (metastasis) of tumour cells. In addition to having anticancer effects, lignans have been shown to improve cognitive function, urinary incontinence and slow the progress of and help the pain and symptoms of Canine Cushing’s Disease, Atypical Cushing’s Disease and Diabetes in Canines. Also vets are recommending Flax lignans for canine Alopecia X.

Veterinarians are recommending 1 mg of SDG lignan per lb of animal weight. Flax Hulls will supply 18-30 mg of SDG lignan per gram of powder. Defatted seed meal will supply 9-30 mg of SDG lignan per gram of powder. SDG levels within flaxseed vary depending on growing conditions.

Defatted meal contains several phytochemicals in addition to lignans— phenolic acids, cinnamic acids, flavonoids and lignins, not to be confused with lignans. These compounds are antioxidants and affect cell growth and viability.

BiologicVET’s source of certified organic GMO-free defatted flax uses only the highest quality crops available. Poor crops are rejected and not used. 1 scoop of any BiologicVET powdered formula will provide at minimum, 20 mg of SDG lignans, enough for a 20 lb animal.
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Adding Vitamin and fatty acids supplements to your dogs food.
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Molly had a great day at the beach, romping in the salt water. She decided salt water was for drinking, and less than an hour Molly vomitted up frothy water and just to show how rapidly salt water can pass through the gut, Molly had watery diarrhoea shortly after that.

A romp in the sand can potentially lead to gut problems. Sand impaction is not a lot of a fun and is occasionally seen in dogs after playing at the beach. The other common issue seen, in terms of what dogs like to ingest at the beach, is salt water ingestion, which can potentially lead to salt toxicity.

Watch your dog closely and provide fresh water often so they are not tempted to do not drink the salt water. Be careful with sandy balls and sticks, the sand compacts and will sit in the intestine, prevent normal gut movement and cause the pet to feel nauseous.
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Gastric Acidity, Digesting Bones, Gut Transit Time and Salmonella
Dr Bruce Syme BVSc(Hons)

http://www.vetsallnatural.com.au/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=107&Itemid=113

There has been much debate about the “potential” dangers of feeding bones to dogs, and also of the potential risks of food poisoning and salmonella infection that the feeding of raw meat to dogs and cats may carry. So it may be of interest to note that much of this information, or mis-information, relates back to the very nature of the gastric environment of the dog and cat, which in turn, is directly related to diet.

The gastric acidity (gastric PH) of the stomach of a dog or cat eating a diet predominantly made up of raw meat is very low (very acidic), with a PH of 2 or lower (relative to the level of meat protein). This highly acidic environment favours the breakdown of raw meats, and raw bones, into soft digestible material. The low PH also is highly effective at killing bacteria, particularly potentially pathogenic bacteria like salmonella spp, clostridia, campylobacter and E Coli. So the natural ‘wild” diet of dogs an cats has evolved a gastric environment that favours the breakdown of raw meats, raw bones, and a PH that kills potentially harmful bacteria – consistent with the requirements of carnivores, and in particular, the scavenging nature of dogs.

Also matched to this highly carnivorous diet (raw meat diet) is a very effective digestive process, which occurs in a relatively short gastrointestinal tract. Dogs and cats have a significantly shorter GI tract compared to other non meat eating (herbivorous) animals, whereas man has an intermediate length. The relative length of the gut reflects that nature of the diet, and how efficiently or slowly the food is broken down and absorbed. Fresh raw meat is easily digested and absorbed compared to vegetable matter, and as such, carnivores have a short gut, and rapid gut transit time – fresh meat can be digested and processed in the carnivores body in as little as 8- 12 hrs, whereas plant and vegetable material in a herbivore’s gut can take 3-5 days to be processed.

What we see with the advent of processed pet foods, is a significant change in the general nature of ingredients in the diet. It is a simple commercial fact that meat protein is the most expensive component in any pet food, and as a result, there is always commercial pressure to keep meat protein levels to a minimum, thereby keeping costs down of the end product (and / or maximising profits). Modern processed pet foods have adapted to these financial constraints firstly by significantly increasing the carbohydrate component of dog and cat foods – corn, wheat, rice, potatoe and other forms of carbohydrate are often the first and most major ingredient in many pet foods. Secondly, processed pet foods have also begun to substitute meat (animal) proteins with plant based proteins that are much cheaper – ingredients like Soya bean and lupins are cheap sources of protein that will increase the overall protein % on the label, but without the associated increase in cost. The problem with this type of substitution is that it does directly impact on the digestive environment of the dog or cat.

In dogs and cats that eat these diets with high carbohydrate, high plant protein and lower meat protein, we find that the acidity level of the stomach begins to decrease (gastric acidity relates to meat protein), and the stomach becomes progressively more alkaline (PH 4 and above). In this less acidic environment, several key issues arise;

1. With the altered PH, gastric digestion and emptying slows down
2. With the altered PH, food bacteria and contaminants are not destroyed as effectively
3. With the altered PH, raw bones and bone material is not softened and broken down effectively (digestive enzymes loose function) and this can result in obstruction.

These problems become clinically apparent when a dog that is fed a highly processed diet is offered a raw bone, or a meal of raw meat. Because the stomach acidity is directly dictated by the meat protein content of the diet, these dogs all ready have a less acidic stomach, which is not able to soften and breakdown raw bone material, nor is the stomach PH able to cope with a load of bacteria. The result can be a sudden “rejection” of the bone or meat, in the form of vomiting, or it can take the form of a bout of acute gastroenteritis, from an overgrowth of bacteria, or it may result in a bone obstruction in the stomach. With the delayed gastric emptying effect, any bacteria that do survive are also able to grow up into much larger numbers, and this effect is continued in the large bowel, with further fermentation of the plant fibre, and a delay in overall gut transit time (up to 24 hrs cf 12 hrs) – this can also result in constipation from excessive water reabsorption, or in loose stools from the over production of short chain fatty acids in the colon.

The problem is that it takes from 7-10 days on a meat based diet for the gastric acidity levels to drop down to the natural (preferred) PH 2 level, so it is not possible for the body to quickly accommodate to such diet changes. What we learn from this are a few fundamental feeding tips :

1. If you intend to feed fresh meat or a raw food diet, you must make this change gradually over 7-10 days - a common complaint I hear is from people who feed bones or fresh meat on odd occasions to their dog that eats primarily dry food is that “he/she cant handle fresh meat or bones because she vomits” – as we see from above, these dogs can handle it if it is introduced gradually, and the gastric acidity is allowed to normalise.

2. If you intend to feed raw bones (which I strongly advise as an important part of every day pet health) then you must include some fresh meat every day as part of your overall diet plan to make sure the gastric PH remains low (acidic)

3. Feeding a raw food diet will actually protect your dog or cat from bacterial contamination and food poisoning, and greatly reduce the chance of an obstruction from eating raw bones. It is a fact that dogs that eat processed foods are even more likely to shed salmonella bacteria in their faeces than are dogs that eat raw food !!

In summary, most of the dietary upsets we see that involve raw meat and bones are actually directly related to the dog or cats general everyday diet, and not so much in relation to the meat or bones.

Given that cats and dogs have been eating raw meat and bones for over 40 million years, it just makes sense that this is what they will thrive on.

Dr Bruce Syme BVSc(Hons).
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There are only two true essential fatty acids (EFAs) "termed parents": linoleic acid (LA) and alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). It is important to understand that we and our pets need these parent omega-6 and parent omega-3 fatty acids to live. Neither can be manufactured in the body. Parent omega-3 fatty acids can be found in a variety of foods and both must come from food. For our pets this can be raw meat, raw eggs, flax oil, ground seeds, hemp oil and unrefined cold pressed oils.

Long-term use of fish oil on its own can lead to significant inflammation. A fish oil supplement supplies the body with large amounts of Omega-3 fats only and not with the critical parents LA and ALA. So when looking for a fatty acid supplement be sure to use one that combines cold pressed flaxseed oil that supplies the parent fatty acids LA and ALA with EPA and DHA from fish oil so an imbalance is not created even when feeding raw.

Using BioFATS along with BioJOINT or BioSKIN&COAT will greatly reduce inflammation in dogs or cats with joint issues or with allergies and skin conditions.
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Your dog's or cat's stomach is highly acidic, with a pH range of 1-2.5. Nothing much can survive that acidic environment – it exists to keep your pet safe from potentially contaminated raw meat and other consumables.

In addition to the acid, dogs and cats also naturally produce a tremendous amount of bile. Bile is both anti-parasitic and anti-pathogenic. So if something potentially harmful isn't entirely neutralized by stomach acid, the bile is a secondary defense. And your pet's powerful pancreatic enzymes also help break down and digest food.

By freezing meats three days before serving (a lot like how sushi is handled), and by removing the guts of prey species, you can successfully avoid exposing your raw fed pet to parasites.
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