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Bill Nash
Works at Photography By Bill Nash
Lived in Phoenix, AZ
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Bill Nash

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Storm chasing across southern New Mexico, last night.

#lightning   #newmexico   #nightphotography
A collection of work showcasing the beauty of our great big world.
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Bill Nash

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A few of you have heard me tell this story over beers, but the photo really drives it home.   Filters seem like a frivolous purchase, sometimes. I picked up a 24mm 1.4L before one of my cross-country road trips, for the express purpose of shooting…
A few of you have heard me tell this story over beers, but the photo really drives it home. Filters seem like a frivolous purchase, sometimes. I picked up a 24mm 1.4L before one of my cross-count…
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Bill Nash

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#ingress: because you always wanted to be in West Side Story but can't sing, dance, or fight.
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I don’t think I’ve shared this photo before, it’s from my last trip to New York, seemed appropriate, since it’s Easter an all. I’ve also been super lax in posting work and updates, so I need to break the seal, right? I’ve actually been spending less time…
I don’t think I’ve shared this photo before, it’s from my last trip to New York, seemed appropriate, since it’s Easter an all. I’ve also been super lax in posting work…
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Wow, St. Patrick's sure cleaned up well. Last time was there was in 2000 before the restoration and the walls were yellow/beige, not white. The whole place looked much darker without the light reflecting off the walls and ceiling.
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And now, for something completely different.
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Spent the day amongst the teeming hordes at the Jacob Javitz Convention Center, attending the very well run New York Comic Con. Didn’t get into any of the big panels, but I did get to sit in Ivy Doomkitty’s panel on body image in cosplay, which is always…
Spent the day amongst the teeming hordes at the Jacob Javitz Convention Center, attending the very well run New York Comic Con. Didn't get into any of the big panels, but I did get to sit in Ivy Do...
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Bill Nash

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Whenever I’m teaching photography, or even just talking shop with new shooters, a question I get a lot is, ‘What lenses should I buy?’ The first and most important accessory you should get for your camera is a tripod. Full stop. Choose one that suits what…
Whenever I’m teaching photography, or even just talking shop with new shooters, a question I get a lot is, ‘What lenses should I buy?’ The first and most important accessory you s…
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Ran across this piece in my feed this morning: ‘FBI will not share iPhone unlocking mechanism, cites lack of ownership’ So a private firm has developed and is, effectively, selling access to a method for unlocking and optionally decrypting an iPhone.…
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It's amazing what you'll find, if you step off the beaten path.
Life as it happens. A collection of candid, as you find it photos of the man-made world.
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This morning's sunrise over Tempe, Arizona.

Don't ask why I was out of bed for a sunrise. It's not important.

#dslr   #tempe   #phoenix   #arizona   #sunrise   #stillabetterlovestorythanTwilight  
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IT'S NOT IMPORTANT.
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Hey +Astro Teller , what are your thoughts on open data, easy to audit, open source, real-time trackable voting systems?

I ran across this debacle while reading various news (from June of last year): http://www.kansas.com/news/politics-government/article27951310.html

Closed source voting systems, where statisticians see anomalies, that can't be audited? This strikes me as the kind of thing that your brainiacs can do some solid work with.

There are two issues that technology can solve, today, and they both circle around the need for verifiable identity management, and the need for a verifiable anonymous voting apparatus.

The first scenario is Congress, including every state legislature. With crypto and a variety of authentication schemes, we already have the tools to verify that any particular piece of information comes from the person we think it comes from. Government, intelligence, and military groups have a pretty solid handle on this. So why do Congressional reps miss votes at all? Why do they need to be present to vote on bills and measures?

More to the point, with the advent of tech like Hangouts plus the OnAir functions, why can't the elected reps stay in their districts and leverage telepresence for EVERY FUNCTION of parliamentary debate? Objections, call for time, yielding time, motions, cloture, whatever. Where is the rich content management that allows citizens to see the text of a bill, amendments, revision history, authors, their business relationships, in real time, next to live video of whoever is debating it?

Why can't we bring elected representatives home, where their constituents have an easier time of accessing them, instead of making it easier for the lobbyists? Better yet, how can we leverage identity management for citizens, so THEY can proxy vote on bills and amendments, giving our elected reps insight as to the will of their electorate? Because accountability is important, right?

The second scenario is anonymous voting records that can be verified by the voters, combined with the ability to vote from the comfort of our homes. I want to be able to sit on my couch, armed with Google and my ipad, take my sweet time voting, either on the day of the election, or even a week in advance. I want to be able to do research, fact checks, donor checks, and make an informed decision instead of trying to pack it all in standing at a voting booth.

I already register to vote at the DMV, so why can't the state send me a sample ballot like they already do, emblazoned with a QR code that represents my vote record? I want to be able to pull out my phone or tablet, tag that code, and vote on a touch screen that doesn't suffer from calibration issues, that puts my anonymized vote into a public data base that pundits, statisticians, and math nerds can snapshot over the course of the election to verify that no records have been changed. I want to be able to print out my vote when I'm done and go back later and compare it to the vote in the database during the tally to make sure that it's accurate.

The banks have infrastructure and mechanisms to tracking dollars and cents to perfect accuracy across billions of daily transactions.
Why can't we have elections we can trust?

This strikes me as the kind of thing that's right up your alley.
A mathematician at Wichita State University who wanted to check the accuracy of some Kansas voting machines after finding odd patterns in election returns said she is finding out how difficult it can be to get government officials to turn over public documents.
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Bill Nash

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The world is full of singular cities, those sprawling metropolises that have no equal in the world. London. Tokyo. San Francisco. Currently, I'm in New York for a few months, and it's a difficult p...
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Have him in circles
8,121 people
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Photographer, Perl Monkey, Technologist, Crazy Uncle
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photography, network management, snmp, sql, elasticsearch, service-now, data center, asset management, tcpip, perl, rabbitmq, troubleshooting, data wareshousing, mysql
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  • Photography By Bill Nash
    Monkey with a Camera, present
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Never question another man's muse. She doesn't speak to you for a reason.
Introduction
Just a permanant kid and his camera. Bill is a headshot, portfolio, architecture, and adventure photographer, living and working in sunny Phoenix, AZ.
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Phoenix, AZ
TL;DR: Salt Lake Comic Con does not honor copyrights of artists and photographers. A comic-con is a celebration of creativity. Of artists, of writers, of our most prized commodity, as a culture: our storytellers. The comic book is a cherished American tradition that has shaped our society and culture, told stories that would otherwise have gone untold, shown sides of our own humanity that we'd never be able to relate to, left to our own devices. We all celebrate at comic-con in different ways. Some of us collect comics, some of us cosplay, and some of us take photos. This brings me to the concept of copyright. It's the glue that holds this entire industry together. From the mighty empire Stan Lee has built atop Marvel Comics, with his legendary heroes and universe spanning conflicts, down to guys like me: Photographers. I shoot comic-cons. Cosplayers, panels, events, you name it. I'm never happiest than when I have a camera in my hand. But even though I'm just one guy, not some big corporation with armies of lawyers, I enjoy the same basic privilege that all artists do: Copyright. The right to determine what my work is used for, and more importantly, the right to earn money on my work. When a corporation uses my work for profit, without my permission, that's theft. Full stop. As a matter of course, Salt Lake Comic-Con regularly posts images on their Twitter and Facebook page that are the property of others. They upload those images instead of sharing them, and then use those images to source viral social-media sharing in conjunction with ticket sales to their annual event. Not only do they not credit the creators, but they simultaneously rob them of the value that would be gained by sharing them from the source. They do this without the permission of the copyright holders, and when called to account for it, shrug it off, take the image down, and then move on to the next piece of valuable imagery that they can find to entice fans of the genre. They've done it to me, and in the weeks since informing SLCC that they did not have permission to use my work for commercial purposes, they've done it to others. It's wrong, and if we've learned anything from the music and movie industry, we know that copyright violations are also a crime. At the very least, it displays both a disregard and even an outright contempt for the very tenets that protect the writers and artists that make this industry thrive.
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Public - 12 months ago
reviewed 12 months ago
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