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Bill French
619 followers -
Writer, consultant, iOS expert (sort'a), product designer, skier, traveler, skier, hard worker, skier.
Writer, consultant, iOS expert (sort'a), product designer, skier, traveler, skier, hard worker, skier.

619 followers
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Bill French commented on a post on Blogger.
Great article Michael!

As we have witnessed, Google Apps [specifically] provides a haven for business and IT automation. In the Apps architecture, HTML, CSS and Javascript conspire as ideal siblings for the development of useful and pleasing cloud-based business applications. Nearly every great web application is, at its core, a blend of these three open web standards.

And the GOOG has magically blended each of these SaaS attributes into a delicately woven scripting fabric that is unbeatable, and especially so if business users are best empowered by email, spreadsheets, documents, and presentations.
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Sentiment Analysis, A Pathway to Smart Automation

Imagine a ground transportation company that presents a simple customer feedback survey to their guests exactly 38 minutes after dropping them off at the airport.

Why 38 minutes?

TED lectures are exactly 18 minutes for a reason.

The timing requesting feedback is crucial; on average, 38 minutes from drop-off is approximately the amount of time the customer spends clearing TSA and checking in. At the 35-minute mark, the guest has settled into a chair with a nice latte waiting to board their flight and all while reflecting on a wonderful ski holiday at Breckenridge.

This science-based feedback timing has created an unexpected surprise; more feedback surveys to read. In fact, 85% more! So many more, the team is a bit overwhelmed. How will they deal with a high response rate for their survey which includes two free-form text fields?

Two Words: Sentiment Analysis

If an automated system could glean just two clues about a text field in the survey, responding to survey feedback could be partially automated.

Ideally, and from a triage perspective, you want to know if the feedback is positive or negative.

My client, Summit Express, uses sentiment analysis to determine if any surveys contain a negative sentiment expressed by the customer. Specifically, management needs to know when things went wrong far more than when they expectedly went right.

By using a simple sentiment check process we can determine which surveys need attention, and we can do it all automatically. In fact, we can also send an apology message (instantly) to the customer from the CEO. And we can alert the management team about service missteps in near-real-time.

And all through a script in Google Apps. Here's a demo. (http://goo.gl/1ZtK0X)

Sentiment Analysis, A Pathway to Smart Automation

Imagine a ground transportation company that presents a simple customer feedback survey to their guests exactly 38 minutes after dropping them off at the airport.

Why 38 minutes?

TED lectures are exactly 18 minutes for a reason.

The timing requesting feedback is crucial; on average, 38 minutes from drop-off is approximately the amount of time the customer spends clearing TSA and checking in. At the 35-minute mark, the guest has settled into a chair with a nice latte waiting to board their flight and all while reflecting on a wonderful ski holiday at Breckenridge.

This science-based feedback timing has created an unexpected surprise; more feedback surveys to read. In fact, 85% more; so many more, the team is a bit overwhelmed with the data. How will they deal with a high response rate for their survey which includes two free-form text fields?

Two Words: Sentiment Analysis

If an automated system could glean three clues about a text field, responding to survey feedback could be partially automated.

My client, Summit Express, uses sentiment analysis to determine if any surveys contain a negative sentiment expressed by the customer. Specifically, management needs to know when things went wrong far more than when they expectedly went right.

By using a simple sentiment check process we can determine which surveys need attention, and we can do it all automatically. In fact, we can also send an apology message (instantly) to the customer from the CEO. And we can alert the management team about service missteps in near real-time.

And all through a script in Google Apps. Here's a demo. (http://goo.gl/1ZtK0X)

Sentiment Analysis, A Pathway to Smart Automation

Imagine a ground transportation company that presents a simple customer feedback survey to their guests exactly 38 minutes after dropping them off at the airport.

Why 38 minutes?

TED lectures are exactly 18 minutes for a reason.

The timing requesting feedback is crucial; on average, 38 minutes from drop-off is approximately the amount of time the customer spends clearing TSA and checking in. At the 35-minute mark, the guest has settled into a chair with a nice latte waiting to board their flight and all while reflecting on a wonderful ski holiday at Breckenridge.

This science-based feedback timing has created an unexpected surprise; more feedback surveys to read. In fact, 85% more! So many more, the team is a bit overwhelmed. How will they deal with a high response rate for their survey which includes two free-form text fields?

Two Words: Sentiment Analysis

If an automated system could glean three clues about a text field, responding to survey feedback could be partially automated.

My client, Summit Express, uses sentiment analysis to determine if any surveys contain a negative sentiment expressed by the customer. Specifically, management needs to know when things went wrong far more than when they expectedly went right.

By using a simple sentiment check process we can determine which surveys need attention, and we can do it all automatically. In fact, we can also send an apology message (instantly) to the customer from the CEO. And we can alert the management team about service missteps in near real-time.

And all through a script in Google Apps. Here's a demo. (http://goo.gl/1ZtK0X)

Sentiment Analysis, A Pathway to Smart Automation

Imagine a ground transportation company that presents a simple customer feedback survey to their guests exactly 38 minutes after dropping them off at the airport.

Why 38 minutes?

TED lectures are exactly 18 minutes for a reason.

The timing requesting feedback is crucial; on average, 38 minutes from drop-off is approximately the amount of time the customer spends clearing TSA and checking in. At the 35-minute mark, the guest has settled into a chair with a nice latte waiting to board their flight and all while reflecting on a wonderful ski holiday at Breckenridge.

This science-based feedback timing has created an unexpected tsunami; more feedback surveys to read. In fact, 85% more! So many more, the team is a bit overwhelmed. How will they deal with a high response rate for their survey which includes two free-form text fields?

Two Words: Sentiment Analysis

If an automated system could glean three clues about a text field, responding to survey feedback could be partially automated.

My client, Summit Express, uses sentiment analysis to determine if any surveys contain a negative sentiment expressed by the customer. Specifically, management needs to know when things went wrong far more than when they expectedly went right.

By using a simple sentiment check process we can determine which surveys need attention, and we can do it all automatically. In fact, we can also send an apology message (instantly) to the customer from the CEO. And we can alert the management team about service missteps in near real-time.

And all through a script in Google Apps. Here's a demo. (http://goo.gl/1ZtK0X)

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Database Not Required

A client recently asked -

"What database are we using and what ties the data relationships together?"

My answer:

"Your application is built without bias to any database technology; it relies on no database in particular and seamlessly interfaces with every database. At its core, it is a cloud-based association of documents, communiques, and data tables that are integrated through lightweight scripts."

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Database Not Required

A client recently asked -

"What database are we using and what ties the data relationships together?"

My answer:

"Your application is built without bias to any database technology; it relies on no database in particular and seamlessly interfaces with every database. At its core, it is a cloud-based association of documents, communiques, and data tables that are integrated through lightweight scripts."

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Database Not Required

Someday perhaps a useful quote - this is about a unique type of Google Apps information management application.

"Your application is built without bias to any database technology; it relies on no database in particular and seamlessly interfaces with every database. At its core, it is a cloud-based association of documents, communiques, and data tables that are integrated through lightweight scripts."
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Big Data, Small Insights: All Possible in Google Apps

If you're building your business on Google Apps, you've chosen the right platform.
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