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Bill DeWitt
Attends University of Kentucky
Lives in Kentucky
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Bill DeWitt

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I just got this as a kindle book, which is kinda crazy because if I really need it my kindle account will be gone too...
 
It's not exactly literature (see my earlier post on Remembrance of Love and Literature), but here's the book I ordered today as a gift for my beloved, +Robert Potter.   

I can't imagine anyone I'd rather rebuild civilization with, should it all come tumbling down around our ears. 
Lewis Dartnell is an astrobiologist in England who wants to help you save the world after civilization collapses. To that end, he's written a book called The Knowledge: How to Rebuild Our World from Scratch. It's the one post-apocalyptic guide you'll ever need. We've got an excerpt.
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To me, the most important part of this is the decentralization. Each area can hire people to build, install, and maintain them, and every section put in pays for itself, and pays for increased area and improvements. Terrorism, natural disasters, etc won't disrupt the whole system, small defects can be routed around.

But we have to drive this forward as a private industry - if the government buys it out we will never see it become a reality.

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/solar-roadways#home
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I don't think the phrase "moving, twisting, shrinking, expanding and unending" matches the modular nature of the project. But they are doing something, at least, and have a demo up with a working stretch soon to follow. My personal hope is that they can set a standard that others can match in competition, so that your hex or my hex can be used to improve the whole system as it goes.

But of course the main advantage is that it uses ground that is already taken over and sitting out in the sun. That covers a multitude of sins.
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I've been waiting for this. Bad timing for me financially, but good to see them getting funded.

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/solar-roadways
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Can't share the fragrance.
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Nope. That's the Engineering building and the Journalism building seen behind the Toyota Cherry garden.
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Instead of backing that guy who wants to make a new video game...
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+Bill DeWitt We launch in about 15 hours
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Bill DeWitt

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I work hard to rebuild my ecosystem. I just wish I still had my appendix.
 
Did you know that your gut bacteria represents a second brain? They even can make us depressed, anxious, obsessive-compulsive, and even autistic. Check out these and 5 more things you likely had no idea gut bacteria could do: http://ow.ly/w50jp
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Neat!
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LOL - "Obama shouldn't have changed our health care until he had a better plan" - the internet.
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Happy Einhorn Day!
 
By Remy Melina
" Ira Einhorn was on stage hosting the first Earth Day event at the Fairmount Park in Philadelphia on April 22, 1970. Seven years later, police raided his closet and found the "composted" body of his ex-girlfriend inside a trunk.

A self-proclaimed environmental activist, Einhorn made a name for himself among ecological groups during the 1960s and '70s by taking on the role of a tie-dye-wearing ecological guru and Philadelphia’s head hippie. With his long beard and gap-toothed smile, Einhorn — who nicknamed himself "Unicorn" because his German-Jewish last name translates to "one horn"  —advocated flower power, peace and free love to his fellow students at the University of Pennsylvania. He also claimed to have helped found Earth Day.

But the charismatic spokesman who helped bring awareness to environmental issues and preached against the Vietnam War — and any violence — had a secret dark side. When his girlfriend of five years, Helen "Holly" Maddux, moved to New York and broke up with him, Einhorn threatened that he would throw her left-behind personal belongings onto the street if she didn't come back to pick them up.

And so on Sept. 9, 1977, Maddux went back to the apartment that she and Einhorn had shared in Philadelphia to collect her things, and was never seen again. When Philadelphia police questioned Einhorn about her mysterious disappearance several weeks later, he claimed that she had gone out to the neighborhood co-op to buy some tofu and sprouts and never returned.

It wasn't until 18 months later that investigators searched Einhorn's apartment after one of his neighbors complained that a reddish-brown, foul-smelling liquid was leaking from the ceiling directly below Einhorn's bedroom closet. Inside the closet, police found Maddux's beaten and partially mummified body stuffed into a trunk that had also been packed with Styrofoam, air fresheners and newspapers.

After his arrest, Einhorn jumped bail and spent decades evading authorities by hiding out in Ireland, Sweden, the United Kingdom and France. After 23 years, he was finally extradited to the United States from France and put on trial. Taking the stand in his own defense, Einhorn claimed that his ex-girlfriend had been killed by CIA agents who framed him for the crime because he knew too much about the agency's paranormal military research. He was convicted of murdering Maddux and is currently serving a life sentence.

Although Einhorn was only the master of ceremonies at the first Earth Day event, he maintains that Earth Day was his idea and that he's responsible for launching it. Understandably, Earth Day's organizers have distanced themselves from his name, citing Gaylord Nelson, an environmental activist and former Wisconsin governor and U.S. senator who died in 2005, as Earth Day's official founder and organizer.

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Sen. Gaylord Nelson created Earth Day in the spring of 1970 as a way to bring national awareness to the fact that, at the time, there were no legal or regulatory mechanisms in place to protect the environment. About 20 million participants at various Earth Day events across the U.S. made Earth Day a success, and in December of 1970, Congress authorized the creation of a new federal agency to tackle environmental issues — the EPA. "
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Now I know what my problem is.
 
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Sigh... Getting tired of saying I told you so...

via +Rachel Palmer 
 
Biofuels made from the leftovers of harvested corn plants are worse than gasoline for global warming in the short term, a study shows, challenging the Obama administration's conclusions that they are a much cleaner oil alternative and will help combat climate change.

Awesome.

So not only did we pollute more by this method than by drilling...we also in the process drove up food costs.  

#winning  
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Nuclear via LFTR and solar via something like http://www.solarroadways.com/  can be worth the investment, but using a years worth of crops to make a month's worth of fuel was never going to be sustainable.
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People
Have him in circles
4,053 people
Work
Occupation
Low Carb, Ukulele playing, Science nerd
Employment
  • Professional Student, present
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Kentucky
Previously
Florida - Vermont
Story
Tagline
We see what we look for.
Introduction
I circle back people who interact through posting in a considerate and reasonable way. Thank you for circling me and please join the conversation.

I'm retired from being a homeschooling SAHD and now have empty nest syndrome. I've gone back to college to get a degree in Biology. I'm an obsessive science-fiction reader, a compulsive inventor, and I have a disordered apartment in a college town. I play the Ukulele in a style borrowed from John King, may he rest in peace. I'm on the spectrum and I feel good about that. I can just about program my way out of a wet paper bag, I've been working with Artificial Intelligence for 10 years, I've recently invented a new method of ceramic construction, a new type of flute, a new knot (salamander hitch), and I make my own bacon fat mayonnaise. I've been working on my own constructed language for 30 years, but I don't have anyone to speak it with. I'm finally learning Japanese. I believe that we have an immaterial part which science is not yet able to measure, but that when, some day, we are able to, it still won't remove the spiritual aspect of it.
Bragging rights
I have solved a Rubik's cube in less than two minutes with ~60 year old fingers.
Education
  • University of Kentucky
    BioChemistry, present
  • Kentucky Community and Technical College System
    BioChemistry, 2011
  • Titusville High School
  • Brevard Community College
  • University of Central Florida
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Other names
Looweewoo, Baerdric, Ukulele Villian
Don't let the slightly dilapidated greenhouses put you off. This is a hidden treasure.
Quality: ExcellentAppeal: Very goodService: Excellent
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
This is just a coffee house, a really good one, but nothing trendy and fabulous. That's what I like about it. There are separate rooms, quiet tables, and good coffee. Perfect for students or conversation with friends. No, they don't have professional performing Baristas's , but they have friendly servers. If you want something fancy, go somewhere else. But if you like coffee and quiet times with friends, it's a great place for that. Plus!... occasional amateur music.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
A great old fashioned movie house with interesting architectural details, large screens, live stages, art gallery and an eclectic snack bar with OBC root beer and local wines. A great place to see independent or special interest movies you won't see at the franchise multiplex cinema.
Appeal: ExcellentFacilities: ExcellentService: Excellent
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
5 reviews
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I had coffee there while waiting for something else. And while everything looked good, I didn't get a chance to try anything. The coffee, however, was great.
Food: Very goodDecor: GoodService: Very good
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago