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Big Blog Of Gardening
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Big Blog Of Gardening

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Is this year going to be the year for your first vegetable garden? Dr. Leonard Perry shares which vegetables are the easiest to grow. http://buff.ly/1FA7GyU
Dr. Leonard Perry from the University of Vermont describes the easiest vegetables to grow for beginning or time-challenged gardeners.
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Compost Tea is not the stuff that drains from the bottom of your compost bin. In fact, that liquid in most cases should never be applied to your garden, as it may contain salts and microbes which may be detrimental to your plants. Learn how to make real compost tea. http://buff.ly/1GINoC8
Compost tea is a perfect lawn and garden feed for those who want a liquid supplement for their plants and soil. Includes easy to make recipe.
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Do you practice crop rotation in your vegetable garden? It's the best way to eliminate or reduce diseases and pests. http://buff.ly/1zgp9eq
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My guidelines for achieving gardening success responsibly. http://buff.ly/1IrvK88
Steps to become a better gardener and create a safer environment for your food, family, pets, wildlife, and the biological community in your soil.
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No self-respecting gardener should ever be without his/her trusty machete. From chopping yard debris for compost to hacking down sunflower stalks, it is one of the most useful garden tools. http://buff.ly/1Q2AyD9
Nothing is better for relieving tension after a long, difficult day than an hour with a machete. You might do spinning classes, pedal a bike 10 miles, or r
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Proper pruning is the key to having good yields from blackberries and raspberries. Without pruning, your berry patch will fill with old canes and both plant vigor and yields will go down.  With proper pruning, you should get good harvests from your bushes for 10 to 30 years. http://buff.ly/1GIQEgL
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Sweet Corn, like tomatoes, tastes far better fresh harvested than purchasing at a market. If you have the room, you won't regret growing corn. http://buff.ly/1IryG4G
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Are you familiar with Keyhole Gardens? This is the way to build a garden bed if you live in a very arid, drought-prone climate (hello, California!). http://buff.ly/1GyVOtl
Keyhole gardening, a sustainable gardening technique used in areas as dry as sub-sahara Africa, can be used to grow food year round.
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No one gets away from weeding – there’s always some rogue, unwanted plants in flower beds, vegetable beds or lawns. Here are some ways I keep weeds under control. http://buff.ly/1FA6hZp
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No room / desire for a food garden? No problem. You can grow many fruits and vegetables in containers on a patio or balcony. http://buff.ly/1JUzZr5
No space for a garden? You can enjoy fresh tomatoes and other veggies by growing them in containers on your patio, apartment balcony, porch, deck, or even in containers placed around your yard.
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Container gardening! A great idea for someone without a lot of space or for beginner gardeners!
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Crop rotation in your garden is key for keeping pests and diseases at bay. http://buff.ly/1GIQYMp
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The dreaded Thistle. Most gardeners in North America are all too familiar with this weed and struggle with it annually. There definitely are ways to deal with it organically. http://buff.ly/1I0KL1B
I have a lot of experience ridding Thistle from gardens, and it's not impossible if you're willing to do a little work when it first appears.
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Have them in circles
1,660 people
Michael O'Leary's profile photo
Wiltshire Turf's profile photo
Nicole Aicher's profile photo
IDeal Garden Markers's profile photo
Lawn Connections's profile photo
John's Gardening Services's profile photo
Harry Perkins's profile photo
Danielle McDuffie's profile photo
alanna rossi's profile photo
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Organic Gardening, Sustainability, Environmental Advocacy
Introduction
Sharing information on caring for your flower gardens, vegetable gardens and lawn using only organic methods. As industrial agriculture and traditional landscapers use increasingly toxic chemical fertilizers and pesticides, anyone who eats food or takes a stroll in a public park is exposed to an ever increasing soup of chemical residues which have proven negative impacts on our health.

I grow and write in the Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania, which is situated where the Lehigh and Delaware rivers meet. At my home I grow as much food as possible – organic vegetables, herbs and fruit – with a focus on sweet corn, beans, tomatoes, basil, sweet peppers, parsley, carrots, potatoes, spinach, thyme, cucumbers, mint, melons, raspberries, blackberries and pears. I also find myself continuously expanding my flower garden when not in my vegetable garden or climbing the pear tree. My wife claims I have “a plant problem” and I think she’s right.

I’m not formally schooled in horticulture or botany, but I started gardening when I was in primary school, working alongside my mother and grandmother. My Paternal Grandfather had been a farmer, as was my Uncle, so you might say I was born into this sort of thing.  As many gardeners have, I learned from experience and listening to the wisdom of previous generations. I add to my knowledge with an ever-expanding personal library devoted to all things plants.

P.S.: I’m always interested in guest blogging opportunities!