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Big Blog Of Gardening
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How cool is this? These Aussies have come up with a way to extract the honey from the honeycomb without disturbing the bees. http://buff.ly/1zHC9nW
Two Aussie inventors have enticed investors like bees to a honeypot with their new hive creation.
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Are you following Big Blog Of Gardening on Pinterest? http://buff.ly/1zAh51m
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Birds have been a gardener’s best pest control since humans first planted crops. Sure, it can be frustrating to watch our avian friends steal the last blueberries, snap off a tulip bloom or eat the corn seed you just planted. But you should consider that a small price, wages for keeping the local insect population in check. http://buff.ly/1DayV0X
As we've moved away from our agrarian roots, we seem to have lost sight of the fact that birds are helpers, not pests, for gardeners.
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There is no doubt that weather patterns are changing. You can contribute to the scientific data by observing plants in your own backyard and reporting it to the USA National Phrenology Network. I report on my lilacs and a few other species. You can report on just one, or as many as you like. http://buff.ly/16adOi5
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I've been advocating cover crops for your garden for years. Now a small number of farmers in the midwest are adopting the practice, with astounding results. Cover cropping massive swaths of farmland will do more for reducing nitrate in waterways than using less fertilizer. http://buff.ly/1I0BcAn
Des Moines, Iowa, wants to control nitrate pollution — often called fertilizer runoff — in nearby rivers. But the best way to reduce it involves planting different crops, not using less fertilizer.
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With some careful planning you can easily incorporate a pond into your outdoor space, no matter how small or large your landscape. http://buff.ly/1z6TUvp
With some careful planning you can easily incorporate a pond into your outdoor space, no matter how small or large your landscape.
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Have them in circles
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What are your thoughts on drinking unpasteurized milk? http://buff.ly/1D1gcno
Selling unpasteurized milk across state lines is illegal because it poses a threat to public health. But raw milk sales are growing nonetheless. Legalization would let states regulate a risky market.
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Awesome. I must say I'm curious. By the way, this isn't a "Frankenplant" or GMO. Potatoes and tomatoes are both members of the nightshade family, so have similar genes. Once the plant breeder found a potato and a tomato that grew well together and fruited, well, Ketchup N Fires. I see this as being a potentially great way of introducing people to gardening, especially kids. http://buff.ly/1A3Kxkc
British horticulturists figured out how to graft a tomato plant onto a potato plant. The plant, called Ketchup 'n' Fries, has crossed the pond and will be available to U.S. gardeners this spring.
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The Washington Post recently reported that worldwide, 2014 was the warmest year on record. With this warming comes distinct affects on your garden. In 2013 a group of scientists proved that for every 1 degree celsius rise in average temperature, flowers bloomed 3 days earlier in the season. http://buff.ly/1DosxRI
A recent study showed that due to climate change, plants are producing flowers earlier than at any point in history. What that means for your garden
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Do you use coldframes in your gardening? http://buff.ly/1yMzfxM
How to Use a Coldframe
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2014 is officially the hottest year on record. Have you noticed changes in what plants survive winters in your area which aren't rated as winter hardy in your zone? I most definitely have: Cala lillies, morning glories, and a few others I planted aren't supposed to survive in zone 6 - yet they come up every year. http://buff.ly/1DoqwVv
NASA and NOAA have confirmed that 2014 was the warmest year in modern record-keeping.
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I can’t tell you how excited I am to start garden seeds indoors while there’s still a blanket of snow on the ground. Watching seeds germinate and seedlings grow while the weather is dreary, brings life to an otherwise gloomy winter. http://buff.ly/164mN5l
Starting seeds indoors is a great way to shake off the winter blues and to get a jump on the gardening season.
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+Deanna Lee Are you using grow lghts, Deanna?
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Have them in circles
1,632 people
dbmeyer Diane Lohmeyer's profile photo
ONEGardening's profile photo
mike barrett's profile photo
Japanese Knotweed Specialists's profile photo
tony brazier's profile photo
Nicole P. Gates's profile photo
Ani K's profile photo
Rx Green Solutions's profile photo
Bill Crouch Garden's profile photo
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Organic Gardening, Sustainability, Environmental Advocacy
Introduction
Sharing information on caring for your flower gardens, vegetable gardens and lawn using only organic methods. As industrial agriculture and traditional landscapers use increasingly toxic chemical fertilizers and pesticides, anyone who eats food or takes a stroll in a public park is exposed to an ever increasing soup of chemical residues which have proven negative impacts on our health.

I grow and write in the Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania, which is situated where the Lehigh and Delaware rivers meet. At my home I grow as much food as possible – organic vegetables, herbs and fruit – with a focus on sweet corn, beans, tomatoes, basil, sweet peppers, parsley, carrots, potatoes, spinach, thyme, cucumbers, mint, melons, raspberries, blackberries and pears. I also find myself continuously expanding my flower garden when not in my vegetable garden or climbing the pear tree. My wife claims I have “a plant problem” and I think she’s right.

I’m not formally schooled in horticulture or botany, but I started gardening when I was in primary school, working alongside my mother and grandmother. My Paternal Grandfather had been a farmer, as was my Uncle, so you might say I was born into this sort of thing.  As many gardeners have, I learned from experience and listening to the wisdom of previous generations. I add to my knowledge with an ever-expanding personal library devoted to all things plants.

P.S.: I’m always interested in guest blogging opportunities!