Profile

Cover photo
Big Blog Of Gardening
1,670 followers|370,554 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideos

Stream

Big Blog Of Gardening

Shared publicly  - 
 
Many organic materials serve as both fertilizers and soil conditioners—they feed both soils and plants. This is one of the most important differences between a chemical approach and an organic approach toward soil care and fertilizing.
For organic gardeners, creating a living soil rich in humus and nutrients is the key to growing great fruits and vegetables, abundant flowers, and long-lived ornamental trees and shrubs. The overall fertility and viability of the soil, rather than the application of fertilizers as quick fixes, is at the very heart of organic gardening.
1
Add a comment...

Big Blog Of Gardening

Shared publicly  - 
 
Hundreds of peer-reviewed scientific papers – dating as far back as 1930 – have described the environmental damage caused by using chemicals to grow food and other plants, yet nitrogen and phosphorous-heavy fertilizers still persist in home gardens and farms.
1
Add a comment...

Big Blog Of Gardening

Shared publicly  - 
 
In my youth, I was allergic to this devil of a plant and would spend a few weeks every spring or summer in great misery. Fortunately I grew out of my sensitivity and have absolutely no reaction to the plant’s resin now, even if I pull it out with my bare hands.
1
Add a comment...

Big Blog Of Gardening

Shared publicly  - 
 
Maintaining an organic garden can be easy if you ally yourself with nature instead of chemically spraying down your plants.
To promote growth of healthy plants, getting rid of pest insects can be as simple as sending in your own army of beneficial insects.
1
Add a comment...

Big Blog Of Gardening

Shared publicly  - 
 
A report released by the Environmental Working Group details which canned food brands use bisphenol A (BPA) in the lining, and which don't. Personally, I make my own soup to avoid this whole mess (and it tastes a hell of a lot better).
1
Add a comment...

Big Blog Of Gardening

Shared publicly  - 
 
Great article which points out how most Americans have competely lost touch with what actually happens on a farm. http://buff.ly/1FtgaTU
Sustainable farmer Joshua Rockwood faces animal abuse charges, and fights back.
1
Add a comment...
Have them in circles
1,670 people
Johny Yianni Cartledge's profile photo
Gabby Smith's profile photo
A Girl and A Garden's profile photo
Muhammad Shayan Khan's profile photo
John's Gardening Services's profile photo
Michael O'Leary's profile photo
ian hutchinson's profile photo
Heirloom Solutions's profile photo
dbmeyer Diane Lohmeyer's profile photo

Big Blog Of Gardening

Shared publicly  - 
 
Every summer someone asks me, “should I prune my tomatoes”? The answer is, as it many times is in gardening, “that all depends…"
2
2
David Snyder's profile photoC&S Gardens's profile photo
Add a comment...

Big Blog Of Gardening

Shared publicly  - 
 
Your lawn and garden simply don’t need chemical fertilizers, herbicides and pesticides. In fact, these chemicals weaken your plants. What your plants need is properly managed soil, which is not as difficult or mysterious as it sounds.
If you’re still using chemicals on your garden and lawn, it’s time to stop. Your lawn and garden don’t need these chemicals, in fact they weaken plants.
1
Add a comment...

Big Blog Of Gardening

Shared publicly  - 
 
According to the Texas Mosquito Control Association a single bat is able to consume anywhere from 1000 to 6000 insects in a single night depending on the size of the bug.Now that's pest control!
A single bat is able to consume from 1000 to 6000 insects a night. Why not employ them to guard your garden and patio by installing a bat box?
1
1
Farmers Wife's profile photo
Add a comment...

Big Blog Of Gardening

Shared publicly  - 
 
Have you ever grown dahlias in your garden? They're quite an impressive flower. Here are tips on growing dahlias from University of Vermont horticulture professor Dr. Leonard Perry.
Tips on growing dahlias from Dr. Leonard Perry, University of Vermont.
1
Add a comment...

Big Blog Of Gardening

Shared publicly  - 
 
A new study from the University of California, Merced shows that as much as 90 percent of our diets could come from locally grown food — if we completely revolutionize our entire farm system. http://buff.ly/1Jo1Qn0
If we completely revolutionize our entire farm system, most of our diets could come from locally grown food, according to a new study.
1
Add a comment...

Big Blog Of Gardening

Shared publicly  - 
 
"Ultimately, the way in which we directly and indirectly manage our planet’s soil will be interwoven within our future success as a species." http://buff.ly/1F3lwIq
A new study of soil warns that we're pushing the limits of our planetary skin and in danger of pulling nutrients out of the earth too fast.
1
Add a comment...
People
Have them in circles
1,670 people
Johny Yianni Cartledge's profile photo
Gabby Smith's profile photo
A Girl and A Garden's profile photo
Muhammad Shayan Khan's profile photo
John's Gardening Services's profile photo
Michael O'Leary's profile photo
ian hutchinson's profile photo
Heirloom Solutions's profile photo
dbmeyer Diane Lohmeyer's profile photo
Contact Information
Contact info
Email
Story
Tagline
Organic Gardening, Sustainability, Environmental Advocacy
Introduction
Sharing information on caring for your flower gardens, vegetable gardens and lawn using only organic methods. As industrial agriculture and traditional landscapers use increasingly toxic chemical fertilizers and pesticides, anyone who eats food or takes a stroll in a public park is exposed to an ever increasing soup of chemical residues which have proven negative impacts on our health.

I grow and write in the Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania, which is situated where the Lehigh and Delaware rivers meet. At my home I grow as much food as possible – organic vegetables, herbs and fruit – with a focus on sweet corn, beans, tomatoes, basil, sweet peppers, parsley, carrots, potatoes, spinach, thyme, cucumbers, mint, melons, raspberries, blackberries and pears. I also find myself continuously expanding my flower garden when not in my vegetable garden or climbing the pear tree. My wife claims I have “a plant problem” and I think she’s right.

I’m not formally schooled in horticulture or botany, but I started gardening when I was in primary school, working alongside my mother and grandmother. My Paternal Grandfather had been a farmer, as was my Uncle, so you might say I was born into this sort of thing.  As many gardeners have, I learned from experience and listening to the wisdom of previous generations. I add to my knowledge with an ever-expanding personal library devoted to all things plants.

P.S.: I’m always interested in guest blogging opportunities!