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Bernard Vatant
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Bernard Vatant

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The fact that the star next door has (at least) one planet is just a confirmation that having planets for a star is the general rule. No wonder. You can't make a cake without letting a few crumbs around.
 
Found: Our Nearest Exoplanet Neighbor

The long-sought and long-imagined planet is larger than Earth, but small enough to be rocky as opposed to a gas or ice giant. Making things even more exciting, the planet was detected inside the habitable zone of Proxima, suggesting that the planet could potentially have temperatures that allow for pooling liquid water.

Innumerable questions remain to be answered before we know if it actually is habitable (as opposed to residing in a habitable zone), and far more before we know if it might actually be inhabited.

But the very exciting news is that an exoplanet has almost definitively been found only 4 light-years from our solar system. There’s every reason to believe it will become the focus of intense and sustained scientific scrutiny.

Read more: http://buff.ly/2bhc5k4
An artist impression of the surface of the candidate planet Proxima b orbiting the red dwarf star Proxima Centauri, the closest star to the Solar System. The double star Alpha Centauri AB also appears in the image. Proxima b is a little more massive than the Earth and orbits in the habitable ...
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Soyons modestes. Nous avons les moyens techniques de conserver vivante pour longtemps la mémoire de ceux qui furent à travers des supports de plus en plus variés. Aussi, à nos transhumanistes je conseillerais volontiers de simplement faire de leur vie quelque chose qui mérite qu'on s'en souvienne. C'est une recette éprouvée pour la seule forme d'immortalité qui semble en valoir la peine, la mémoire des autres.
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L'immortalité est à la mode. A en croire certains soi-disant "transhumanistes", c'est ce que nous promet l'intelligence artificielle à plus ou moins brève échéance, en tout cas dans le courant de ce siècle. Au train où vont l...
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This year we'll use the resources of 1.6 Earths.
By 8 August, we had already used up all the Earth's resources for the year.
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Depuis plusieurs jours, impossible de transférer de l'argent depuis des comptes épargne de la BNP Paribas, même via le réseau interne depuis les guichets des agences! Discrétion totale dans les médias. Qui va payer les agios et autres frais occasionnés? #bnpparibas   #fail  
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Problème sur le site BNP Paribas, impossible de se connecter. Il y a-t-il une maintenance en cours?
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Luca, the Last Universal Common Ancestor, is estimated to have lived some four billion years ago, when Earth was a mere 560 million years old.  For a long time the three great domains of life bacteria, the archaea and the eukaryotes, seemed to have no common point of origin. But now scientists have zeroed in on 355 genes that probably originated in Luca, the joint ancestor of bacteria and archaea… and thus they stumbled onto strong indications of conditions for the origin of all Earthly life.  Because those 355 genes point very strongly at deep sea volcanic vents – “the gassy, metal-laden, intensely hot plumes caused by seawater interacting with magma erupting through the ocean floor.”
 
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/26/science/last-universal-ancestor.html?_r=0
 
The 355 genes ascribable to Luca include some that metabolize hydrogen as a source of energy as well as a gene for an enzyme called reverse gyrase, found only in microbes that live at extremely high temperatures.  This much is spectacular!  It means that astronomers are not the only ones using amazing inferences to peer beyond all previous limitations toward early origins.
 
From my perspective as a planetary scientist and science fiction author, I have to say that the implications are huge for life elsewhere.  For volcanic vents are exactly the sort of thing one expects to find at the bottoms of the “roofed oceans” that we now figure exist on at least ten small worlds in just this solar system, starting with Europa and Enceledus.
 
Moreover, the LUCA lead researcher has taken this a step further, in an inference that is weaker but just as startling!  The inferred, 355 gene LUCA seems to be missing so many genes necessary for life that it must still have been relying on chemical components from its environment. In other words: it still relied on a surrounding “soup” of chemicals created abiotically, presumably by the basal “Miller-Urey-Orgel” processes.  Hence it was only “half alive,” Dr. William F. Martin of Heinrich Heine University in Düsseldorf writes.
 
The latter supposition is viewed skeptically by those who think the Soup got all used up millions of years earlier, before the Late Bombardment. Still… this is a terrific article.  Wow.  What times we live in.  And what a loss for those waging War on Science. You folks are missing out, exactly as we are learning so much about Creation.
A single-cell, bacterium-like organism clinging to volcanic sea vents may have been the forebear of every animal, plant and microbe on earth.
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The missing piece to make this really great is an artificial intelligence layer. I imagine all FarmBot installations feeding a data base of farming experiences, and machine learning running on this to optimize the future installations. Intelligent Farm Grid.
+The FarmBot Project 
 
The maker movement and the grow your own movement: better together.
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I'd be surprised if they didn't do something like that, Bernard, but if they don't, they should, good idea.
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That's no game any more. Or the worst of them all.
 
Artificial intelligence (AI) developed by a University of Cincinnati doctoral graduate was recently assessed by subject-matter expert and retired United States Air Force Colonel Gene Lee — who holds extensive aerial combat experience as an instructor and… #science  
Artificial intelligence recently won out during simulated aerial combat against U.S. expert tacticians. Importantly, it did so using no more than ...
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The methodology is presented at length in the paper published in the Journal of Defense Management and referenced in the deepstuff.org article. Is it a good idea to expose all those details in a public paper? Should not that be classified material?
http://dx.doi.org/10.4172/2167-0374.1000144
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Bernard Vatant

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Immortality is a weird idea. Let's assume for a moment we really achieve it ...
Immortality is trendy. According to some so-called "transhumanists", it is the promise of artificial intelligence at short or medium term, at the very least before the end of the 21st century. Considering the current advances...
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If you sketch what you see in a museum you will remember much more than if you took photos. Though, if you study details of what you are taking a photo of you will remember quite well, also.

http://www.npr.org/2016/04/17/474525392/attention-students-put-your-laptops-away?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=npr&utm_term=nprnews&utm_content=20160826
Researchers Pam Mueller and Daniel M. Oppenheimer found that students remember more via taking notes longhand rather than on a laptop. It has to do with what happens when you're forced to slow down.
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Haha I love this part, "When testing how well the [guinea pigs] remembered information, the researchers found a key point of divergence in the type of question. For questions that asked students to simply remember facts, like dates, both groups did equally well. But for "conceptual-application" questions, such as, "How do Japan and Sweden differ in their approaches to equality within their societies?" the laptop users did "significantly worse."

:)
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I don't understand why this is a question, the answer being so obviously YES, OF COURSE !!!
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In the wake of yet another terrorist attack, this time in Nice, France during Bastille Day celebrations, the finger-pointing and mischaracterizations are running pretty thick in some political circles. Of course, any chance some people have, they will blame President Obama for every problem nearly anywhere.

In actuality, there’s not much that can be done to stop someone that gets behind the wheel of a vehicle that is determined to plow through a crowd of innocents in order to kill them. 

Then, they move on to what we must call the people that are responsible for this violence, as if labels actually would magically alter Sun Tzu’s principles of The Art of War.

Labeling works well when living with someone with dementia to let them know where things are. It doesn't actually accomplish anything to stop violence predicated and supported by an extremist ideology. There are no amount of bombs or invasions that could ever destroy an idea that has its home in hearts and minds. 

Some people might not want to understand why these violent extremists do what they do, but why would making the attempt to figure that out be so quickly demonized? 

Labels don't win wars. Defeating the enemy does. This enemy isn't a nation-state. It's an ideology. Certainly, robbing that ideology of safe harbors is crucial, but understanding how and why it festers and robbing it of the fuels that contributes to its spread and its appeal that give it new lifeblood is even more critical.

Certainly, as we are the targets of its attacks, being divided and squabbling amongst ourselves makes us less safe as we're not focused on the real enemy.

Let's come together, because we're stronger together. 
In the wake of yet another terrorist attack, this time in Nice, France during Bastille Day celebrations, the finger-pointing and mischaracterizations are running pretty thick in some political circles. Of course, any chance s...
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Pour tous les jardiniers qui comme moi ont grogné contre l'abondance de gastéropodes en ce printemps pourri. Histoire de se réconcilier avec tous ces charmants gastéropodes.
http://permaforet.blogspot.fr/2014/07/cultiver-avec-les-limaces-et-les.html
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Les limaces sont-elles nuisibles? Du recyclage de la matière, à la cohésion du sol jusqu'au repas favori d'animaux compagnons, les gastéropodes jouent un rôle pionnier dans l'écologie des milieux, jardin potager y compris. To...
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