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Bernard Vatant

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This is crazy and amazing. China is moving over to renewables as quickly as they can.

http://in.reuters.com/article/china-coal-idINKBN1511A2
China's energy regulator has ordered 11 provinces to stop more than 100 coal-fired power projects, with a combined installed capacity of more than 100 gigawatts, its latest dramatic step to curb the use of fossil fuels in the world's top energy market.
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Bernard Vatant

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While walking on familiar streets,
crossing your favorite bridges,
jumping the puddles after the rain
have you ever tried to refocus your eyes
and look into the shining surface?

You could see the tops
of the lamp posts,
the roofs and the sky
under your feet
as if
you are flying.

Have your ever tried
to say anything
right into headlights
of a train running into your face
and stop it?

Have you ever survived
betray
or defeat?
If not, that is okay.
It simply means
you have not lived.

IRiz January 2017

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Bernard Vatant

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Trees are nice writers.
And +Irene Riz reads trees very nicely.
But not only - she also reads (long) books. Discovered her through her comment on a lively +Mac Vogt post about 1Q84.
https://plus.google.com/u/0/+MacVogt/posts/4fNF6JwqeRf

#serendipity

 
My first tale


Humans had been around trees for long enough now that the trees decided they wanted to understand humans better.
At first glance they realized that humans do not have roots.
This shocking discovery made them shiver and filled their souls with compassion. They prayed to human God and ask for the roots for humans.

God laughed and said that it is a silly idea, because humans like to wander.
A few hundred years later trees noticed that humans suffer a lot from cold and heat and they prayed for human God to take away their pain.

God replied with a brief note saying that humans need to feel happiness that does not exist without pain.

The last thing they asked was to make humans to live as long as they were.
That exhausted god's patience because humans only move if they are pressed for time.
God did not answer anything so trees are still praying for us.

Do you see a praying figure on the right?

(C) IRiz 2016

Nature inspires to create. There are endless hints in the woods that inspired our predecessors to create myths and tales. Last year I started to collect the images of the dried branches and old trees that looked mysterious or reminded me of creatures or have some sort of a character.
I invite everyone to join me and help to continue my collection.
Let's try to think of a tale or a plot that involves the creature.
Tag your post #forestsculpture and I will re-share it here.

#forestsculpture
#woods
#hiking
#fungame
#imagination
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+Irene Riz You are welcome
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This piece does a great job of really driving home what it means that, according to our best scientific evidence, Neanderthals were very similar to modern humans. It helps envision a world where different human species lived side by side, and also explores the human tendency of othering and how that led us to misunderstand the evidence for so long.

I've always been bothered by the tendency to distance ourselves from our past when considering our evolutionary lineage. With apes and even other mammals we ignore the signs of intelligence, empathy, communication, and culture that are absolutely there. When we find evidence of extinct hominins, we tend to imagine them as very animal like, even when our own theories of evolution suggest they should be always trending towards humanness. We like to imagine there's some great gulf between us and the animals, right up until that last moment when suddenly modern humans rocked the world.

I agree that part of this is our sense of exceptionalism, but perhaps it also reflects our lack of intuition around exponential growth. I like to think of intelligence as something that grows exponentially, and I tend to think of all life on this planet as one ecosystem. I would argue the maximum complexity of life and other forms of information technology grow at an exponential rate. Yet, when we think of evolution, we seem to expect a linear or stepwise rate of change. Humans are an order of magnitude smarter than chimps, and there's not a lot of intermediate complexity around, so we say "obviously" there must have been some huge leap in ability. Similarly, we tend to think of the different classes of animals as fitting one "tier" of intelligence or another.

I think the reality is much more subtle. Complexity lies on a broad and continuous spectrum. It's advancing faster and faster, and innovations happen all over the tree of life, not just the privileged hominin branch. It's bursty, sure, but I expect the rate of change overall is smoother and more continuous than we think, on a geological time scale. Our view is very limited and patchy. We see the gaps in knowledge as leaps in evolution, mostly because we find it unintuitive to interpolate with an exponential curve.
New research shows they shared many behaviors that we long believed to be uniquely human. Why did science get them so wrong?
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Still struggling with my novel's characters who have kept driving me crazy, just ignoring the story signposts I thought I had made clear for them, changing their minds and moods without notice, not showing the slightest respect whatsoever for their creator.

I have no choice. Either they follow me, or I'm bound to follow them. We will need each other until I write "The End".

I feel less lonely reading that.
 
I still make coffee btw. Here, also, this bit on writing stuck with me. It's a good way to put it:

If you aren’t taken by surprise in the process of putting words on paper then you’re only writing about what you already know, you’re trucking in conclusions. I need a crisis, I’m courting failure, the possibility of silence, because it’s only at that moment that I actually need to find words, new words hopefully.

-- Charles D'Ambrosio.

I don't actually know who he is, but I like the quote. I think it would apply to any creative thing, don't you think? Don't you know the power of luck when, magically, what you are doing makes sense? Your subconscious naturally wants to pick out patterns, and that's where all your complexity and newness thrives, so you gotta trust you'll be able to survive in the forest, that you can find some ranging completeness.

Even though, a lot of times, you don't!

I want a tolerance for failure, even as I want the clarity that intolerance can bring.

It's a blind trust. I know it doesn't happen often, but I know it could, but even if I feel that potential for the new welling up in me, it translates about as well as thinking a scratch ticket is gonna win. The truth is my intuition is mostly hidden by a wall, and jumping in is blind, and the new just happens like a lightning strike. As soon as I think it's not like that, I'm sliding further from the truth and into preconceived, stale notions.

What has this to do with coffee? Not a lot. It's pretty though isn't it?
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+Irene Riz Nobody is perfect :)
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Moves to designate wood as a carbon-neutral fuel have alarmed environmentalists and divided scientists.
A push to promote wood as a source of renewable, low-carbon energy has set off a debate among scientists about the implications for the climate and forest ecosystems. Much of the discussion has revolved around forests in the southeastern United States, where a wood pellet industry is booming as the region supplies wood for European power plants, where the fuel has been deemed "carbon neutral." Other parts of the world are also starting to tap int...
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According to author Amy Arden, the success of worldbuilding is "in the details"! And when it comes to historical fiction, attention to detail is crucial to creating a story that feels real.

Read on for her go-to resources when it comes to digging through the past.
Novelist Amy Arden shares worldbuilding resources, to help authors of historical fiction create their own worlds within the existing context of the past.
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+Debra Roberts

Either this is a genuine page from a real book, having lost reference, title, author and any kind of metadata.
Or maybe it's an anonymous book, with only the page #189.

In either case, worth reading.

Inscrutability of reference
https://bvatant.blogspot.fr/2015/12/backtracking-signs.html
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lol, page 189 is definitely good one
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Ambient Intelligence

Our good ol' fridge, after almost 20 years of faithful service, has decided to expire overnight. A very timely decision, given the current cold wave. Its content has been safely moved to the garage, which is just at the right cool temperature. 
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+Bernard Vatant
so glad it is cold the garage kept your food in tact. They do expires as we do,, as all things do eventually Sorry for the inconvenience
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In the quoted article is a link to a 2013 report by the American Civil Liberties Union. The caption of the front cover is the following

"A life sentence in Louisiana means life without the possibility of parole. Because of harsh sentencing laws, about 95 percent of the 5,225 people imprisoned at the Louisiana State Penitentiary at Angola will die there. Louisiana is the state with the highest number of prisoners serving life without parole for nonviolent offenses in the United States, with 429 such prisoners, 91 percent of whom are Black according to the ACLU’s estimates."

https://www.aclu.org/files/assets/111813-lwop-complete-report.pdf
 
Wade was sentenced to life without parole before his twenty-first birthday for breaking into a previously stolen unoccupied vehicle. On the day of his arrest, o...
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That's an abomination but in those southern states such as Louisiana Georgia Alabama even the Carolinas and some areas of Florida there is no legal system. It is all bigotry and racism
It is the primary reason why I left the area and went back to New York City and Boston for my education then came out 2 Colorado
Pathetic system at times unfortunately
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Lettres ouvertes qui méritent de se poser un moment pour les lire.

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+Bernard Vatant merci!!!
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Wow ...
Someday Robot would be outsmart mankind because we have to sleep. 😂

Are we getting there yet?
It takes days to reprogram an industrial robot. With artificial intelligence, it could take only a few hours.
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