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Ben Kennedy
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Bastion of calling himself a bastion.
Bastion of calling himself a bastion.

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The Chef's Knife
I know, I know. Last time I was rambling a bit about the difference between a chef and a cook. You don't have to be a chef to use a chef's knife. Some call this knife a kitchen knife, which would be a more egalitarian name, but I think it's also kind of amb...

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The contents of this blog post should really be common sense, but it's a good read and a gorgeous webpage regardless. #RWU students and students in general should bookmark.
Have you ever gotten an email from a student asking you for a favor and thought to yourself, "This is not how you ask me for something"? My latest blog post gives students some advice about asking their professors for something. 
http://robertjacobson.herokuapp.com/blog/2014/04/12/how-to-ask-your-professor-for-something/
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Anne Wheaton is totally hilarious. What a great project.
My wife makes me laugh, and impresses me with her creativity. She spent most of last night building little figures out of supplies she got at the craft store, so she could pose them and take selfies of them.

Of course, because it's an elf having a night on the town with his friends, she called them #elfies, because there is nothing in the world Anne loves more than puns.

Anyway, hope this thing she made amuses you as much as it amused me.

Happy Christmas Eve.

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My inner writing nerd is happy this morning.
Draw a Line — Dashes and the Subtleties of Elegant Writing
A guide for the oblivious and unaware

http://blog.opoloo.com/articles/draw-a-line-dashes-and-the-subtleties-of-elegant-writing

"The dash introduces versatility to writing and takes it to another level — the level of consciousness, of elegance. It allows for variation in style, it changes the tone and voice of your writing. It's a very powerful tool if it's applied according to function."

An article by +Nino Rapin on +Opoloo's Squirrel Park.

#useofdash  
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Pretty certain I recall a book (possibly For The Win by Doctorow) where this was actually a paying job. People actually played some kind of gamified version of airport security with NPCs somehow correlating to people walking through checkpoints in real-time. This is eerily similar.

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Read this whole thing.
Guest post by Elise Matthesen: How to Report Sexual Harassment

(A friend of mine wrote this, and I and a few other people in the community are posting her narrative to raise awareness. —Brandon)

How to Report Sexual Harassment

by Elise Mattheson

We're geeks. We learn things and share, right? Well, this year at WisCon I learned firsthand how to report sexual harassment. In case you ever need or want to know, here's what I learned and how it went.

Two editors I knew were throwing a book release party on Friday night at the convention. I was there, standing around with a drink talking about Babylon 5, the work of China Mieville, and Marxist theories of labor (like you do) when an editor from a different house joined the conversation briefly and decided to do the thing that I reported. A minute or two after he left, one of the hosts came over to check on me. I was lucky: my host was alert and aware. On hearing what had happened, he gave me the name of a mandated reporter at the company the harasser was representing at the convention.

The mandated reporter was respectful and professional. Even though I knew them, reporting this stuff is scary, especially about someone who's been with a company for a long time, so I was really glad to be listened to. Since the incident happened during Memorial Day weekend, I was told Human Resources would follow up with me on Tuesday.

There was most of a convention between then and Tuesday, and I didn't like the thought of more of this nonsense (there's a polite word for it!) happening, so I went and found a convention Safety staffer. He asked me right away whether I was okay and whether I wanted someone with me while we talked or would rather speak privately. A friend was nearby, a previous Guest of Honor at the convention, and I asked her to stay for the conversation. The Safety person asked whether I'd like to make a formal report. I told him, "I'd just like to tell you what happened informally, I guess, while I figure out what I want to do."

It may seem odd to hesitate to make a formal report to a convention when one has just called somebody's employer and begun the process of formally reporting there, but that's how it was. I think I was a little bit in shock. (I kept shaking my head and thinking, "Dude, seriously??") So the Safety person closed his notebook and listened attentively. Partway through my account, I said, "Okay, open your notebook, because yeah, this should be official." Thus began the formal report to the convention. We listed what had happened, when and where, the names of other people who were there when it happened, and so forth. The Safety person told me he would be taking the report up to the next level, checked again to see whether I was okay, and then went.

I had been nervous about doing it, even though the Safety person and the friend sitting with us were people I have known for years. Sitting there, I tried to imagine how nervous I would have been if I were twenty-some years old and at my first convention. What if I were just starting out and had been hoping to show a manuscript to that editor? Would I have thought this kind of behavior was business as usual? What if I were afraid that person would blacklist me if I didn't make nice and go along with it? If I had been less experienced, less surrounded by people I could call on for strength and encouragement, would I have been able to report it at all?

Well, I actually know the answer to that one: I wouldn't have. I know this because I did not report it when it happened to me in my twenties. I didn't report it when it happened to me in my forties either. There are lots of reasons people might not report things, and I'm not going to tell someone they're wrong for choosing not to report. What I intend to do by writing this is to give some kind of road map to someone who is considering reporting. We're geeks, right? Learning something and sharing is what we do.

So I reported it to the convention. Somewhere in there they asked, "Shall we use your name?" I thought for a millisecond and said, "Oh, hell yes."

This is an important thing. A formal report has a name attached. More about this later.

The Safety team kept checking in with me. The coordinators of the convention were promptly involved. Someone told me that since it was the first report, the editor would not be asked to leave the convention. I was surprised it was the first report, but hey, if it was and if that's the process, follow the process. They told me they had instructed him to keep away from me for the rest of the convention. I thanked them.

Starting on Tuesday, the HR department of his company got in touch with me. They too were respectful and took the incident very seriously. Again I described what, where and when, and who had been present for the incident and aftermath. They asked me if I was making a formal report and wanted my name used. Again I said, "Hell, yes."

Both HR and Legal were in touch with me over the following weeks. HR called and emailed enough times that my husband started calling them "your good friends at HR." They also followed through on checking with the other people, and did so with a promptness that was good to see.

Although their behavior was professional and respectful, I was stunned when I found out that mine was the first formal report filed there as well. From various discussions in person and online, I knew for certain that I was not the only one to have reported inappropriate behavior by this person to his employer. It turned out that the previous reports had been made confidentially and not through HR and Legal. Therefore my report was the first one, because it was the first one that had ever been formally recorded.

Corporations (and conventions with formal procedures) live and die by the written word. "Records, or it didn't happen" is how it works, at least as far as doing anything official about it. So here I was, and here we all were, with a situation where this had definitely happened before, but which we had to treat as if it were the first time—because for formal purposes, it was.

I asked whether people who had originally made confidential reports could go ahead and file formal ones now. There was a bit of confusion around an erroneous answer by someone in another department, but then the person at Legal clearly said that "the past is past" is not an accurate summation of company policy, and that she (and all the other people listed in the company's publically-available code of conduct) would definitely accept formal reports regardless of whether the behavior took place last week or last year.

If you choose to report, I hope this writing is useful to you. If you're new to the genre, please be assured that sexual harassment is NOT acceptable business-as-usual. I have had numerous editors tell me that reporting harassment will NOT get you blacklisted, that they WANT the bad apples reported and dealt with, and that this is very important to them, because this kind of thing is bad for everyone and is not okay. The thing is, though, that I'm fifty-two years old, familiar with the field and the world of conventions, moderately well known to many professionals in the field, and relatively well-liked. I've got a lot of social credit. And yet even I was nervous and a little in shock when faced with deciding whether or not to report what happened. Even I was thinking, "Oh, God, do I have to? What if this gets really ugly?"

But every time I got that scared feeling in my guts and the sensation of having a target between my shoulder blades, I thought, "How much worse would this be if I were inexperienced, if I were new to the field, if I were a lot younger?" A thousand times worse. So I took a deep breath and squared my shoulders and said, "Hell, yes, use my name." And while it's scary to write this now, and while various people are worried that parts of the Internet may fall on my head, I'm going to share the knowledge—because I'm a geek, and that's what we do.

So if you need to report this stuff, the following things may make it easier to do so. Not easy, because I don't think it's gotten anywhere near easy, but they'll probably help.

NOTES: As soon as you can, make notes on the following:
• what happened
• when it happened and where
• who else was present (if anyone)
• any other possibly useful information

And take notes as you go through the process of reporting: write down who you talk with in the organization to which you are reporting, and when.

ALLIES: Line up your support team. When you report an incident of sexual harassment to a convention, it is fine to take a friend with you. A friend can keep you company while you make a report to a company by phone or in email. Some allies can help by hanging out with you at convention programming or parties or events, ready to be a buffer in case of unfortunate events—or by just reminding you to eat, if you're too stressed to remember. If you're in shock, please try to tell your allies this, and ask for help if you can.

NAVIGATION: If there are procedures in place, what are they? Where do you start to make a report and how? (Finding out might be a job to outsource to allies.) Some companies have current codes of conduct posted on line with contact information for people to report harassment to. Jim Hines posted a list of contacts at various companies a while ago. Conventions should have a safety team listed in the program book. Know the difference between formal reports and informal reports. Ask what happens next with your report, and whether there will be a formal record of it, or whether it will result in a supervisor telling the person "Don't do that," but will be confidential and will not be counted formally.

REPORTING FORMALLY: This is a particularly important point. Serial harassers can get any number of little talking-to's and still have a clear record, which means HR and Legal can't make any disciplinary action stick when formal reports do finally get made. This is the sort of thing that can get companies really bad reputations, and the ongoing behavior hurts everybody in the field. It is particularly poisonous if the inappropriate behavior is consistently directed toward people over whom the harasser has some kind of real or perceived power: an aspiring writer may hesitate to report an editor, for instance, due to fear of economic harm or reprisal.

STAY SAFE: You get to choose what to do, because you're the only one who knows your situation and what risks you will and won't take. If not reporting is what you need to do, that's what you get to do, and if anybody gives you trouble about making that choice to stay safe, you can sic me on them. Me, I've had a bunch of conversations with my husband, and I've had a bunch of conversations with other people, and I hate the fact that I'm scared that there might be legal wrangling (from the person I'd name, not the convention or his employer) if I name names. But after all those conversations, I'm not going to. Instead, I'm writing the most important part, about how to report this, and make it work, which is so much bigger than one person's distasteful experience.

During the incident, the person I reported said, "Gosh, you're lovely when you're angry." You know what? I've been getting prettier and prettier.

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Up-and-coming #cloud storage service with big referral bonuses and a nice, frequently updated app. #Linux support too. Definitely a competitor for #DropBox. Check it out.

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Great post. I don't know what these two dudes wanted, but if their goal was to prove Benjamin Franklin's old "trade freedom for security and you don't deserve (or won't receive) either one" [paraphrased] quote to be relevant over 250 years later, they succeeded.

+Mark Kennedy I think you'd like this, it resonates with your facebook post from earlier today.
Undeclared martial law, dancing to terrorists' tune, ... and we applauded
I think I'm one of the few people disturbed and unhappy by how the manhunt was run in Boston and by how few people even questioned if any of this was legal.  Or what precedent we just set.

The media, who should have been loudest in questioning these actions, used the polite term "lockdown" to describe what was an undeclared martial law.  When you shut down all transportation, close businesses, tell citizens they must remain inside their homes, and bring in the armored vehicles - that's martial law.  When you search people's bags and demand their ID because they are walking on the street - that's martial law.  When you "ask" people for "consent" to search their homes by sticking your foot in the door and using intimidation and fear - that's martial law.  Taking a US citizen into custody and not reading him his rights and interrogating him without right to council AND planning to use what he says in court - is far past martial law.  

A pair of terrorists do a heinous act and we oblige them with wall to wall 24 hour coverage.  We magnify the effects of the act by forcing a major US city to completely shut down.  We further do the terrorists job for them by spitting on the 4th and 5th, (and possibly 6th) amendments in the name of public safety.  Hell, we didn't just dance to the terrorists' tune, we added an orchestra.

I have no problem with the police, FBI, SWAT officers.  They, for the most part, were trying to be as polite and focused as possible.  They put their lives on the line and one of them didn't make it.  If there was a manhunt for a very violent criminal taking place in my area and the police showed up and politely asked if they could search my home for the suspect, I'd most likely let them.  If authorities asked me to stay off the streets so they could more easily locate a dangerous criminal, I'd most likely comply.  What I object to is how the city officials pretended to ask for voluntary actions on the part of citizens, but their actions made it plain it was anything but voluntary.  I object to doing the terrorists' job for them by shutting down an entire city, causing more disruption and fear than the original act caused.  I object to the passive way we now accept voiding our rights, as in Boston or at any airport or our online data (CISPA passed the House, did you know that?), because the government tells us that's what we must do to be safe.  The Patriot Act, Kill Lists by our President, Drone attacks, suspension of Due Process ... and now martial law in our cities?  Is this another step along the path of The New Normal? 

Every citizen is protected under the constitution, no matter what they have done or what person the authorities are searching for, or we are no longer the United States of America.  The terrorists won this round (again) and we helped them and then applauded.

And want to know the sad kicker to this string of events?  The 19 year old suspect wasn't found through these illegal actions.  He was found by a homeowner who went out to check his property after the undeclared martial law was lifted.  

More photos here, tell me this is what we really want? :  https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&site=imghp&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1366&bih=600&q=boston%2C+searching+homes&oq=boston%2C+searching+homes&gs_l=img.3...1510.10557.0.11148.25.17.1.7.3.0.99.1223.17.17.0...0.0...1ac.1.9.img.tOue-7cTe40#imgrc=_

EDITED TO ADD: Just a note - this post hit "What's Hot" which should be relabeled as "Here come trolls".  If you troll or flame your post gets removed.
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Good overview of a greatly helpful app for students and anyone who doesn't like to have to deal with managing physical paperwork!
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