Profile

Cover photo
Verified name
Barry Schwartz
Works at Search Engine Roundtable
Attended Baruch College
Lives in New York
77,403 followers|4,343,680 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideos

Stream

 
yes I did #throughglass
20
1
Chaim Cohen's profile photoJake Steinerman's profile photoRafael Jason Hecht's profile photoדוד נסטל's profile photo
3 comments
 
Yup
Add a comment...
 
Jewish people starting "counting the omer" after Passover started.  We are on day three now and Jewish Guide For Glass (aka JewGlass) sends reminders at night fall and a follow up at around 9am local time.  This is just one thing our +Google Glass Glassware does.  More details at http://www.rustybrick.com/glass-jew.php
1
Add a comment...
 
So I set up a test to confirm AdWords ads no longer pass keyword data via referrer.  I went from Google SSL to an SSL page to confirm it and it passed, no referrer data being passed around the keyword.
21
3
William Rock's profile photoMarco Obregon's profile photoKen Hirooka's profile photoBill Hartzer's profile photo
 
Amazing!
As long as I've heard, the changes in April 9th was about query, not keyword.
Does this test mean there's another change on Adwords?
Add a comment...

Barry Schwartz

Shared publicly  - 
 
+Google AdSense upgrades the Ad Review Center
Google announced they have made major improvements to the Ad Review Center within Google AdSense.The ad review center lets publishers monitor and approve/reject ads from advertisers. The new features
7
2
Ahmad Rifai El-lahib's profile photoJean Bernard Breu's profile photo
Add a comment...

Barry Schwartz

Shared publicly  - 
 
Wouldn't it be nice if +Google AdSense communicated better and was more transparent? 
We all know that Google AdWords used quality score as a major factor with ranking ads and with that, they have added features over the years to communicate to advertisers how they can improve their qu
1
1
Robert O'Haver's profile photomark hare's profile photo
 
I've always had 8/10 or higher by making sure the ads, landing page (if there is one), and destination page all have consistent terminology and clearly explain the purpose at each level without resorting to trying to slip in a CTA at the ad level or cross sell at the page or landing page level.
But I've seen guys pulling their hair out over this too. So maybe I've just been lucky or something. 
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
77,403 people

Barry Schwartz

Shared publicly  - 
3
Barry Schwartz's profile photoChris M Cloutier's profile photomark hare's profile photo
3 comments
 
Still 404
Add a comment...

Barry Schwartz

Shared publicly  - 
14
7
Bobby Islam's profile photoErkan Bey's profile photoPeter Mead's profile photoDeepak Rajput's profile photo
 
This spring, NASA will be paying cautious attention to a comet that could put on a barnstorming show at Mars on Oct. 19, 2014.
On that date, comet C/2013 A1 Siding Spring will buzz Mars about 10 times closer than any identified comet has ever flown past Earth.
Spacecraft at Mars might get a good look at the nucleus of comet Siding Spring as it heads toward the closest approach, roughly 86,000 miles (138,000 kilometers) from the planet, give or take a few percent. On the other hand, dust particles that the comet nucleus sheds this spring could threaten orbiting spacecraft at Mars in October.
The level of risk won't be known for months, but NASA is already evaluating possible precautionary measures as it prepares for studying the comet.
"Our plans for using spacecraft at Mars to observe comet Siding Spring will be coordinated with plans for how the orbiters will duck and cover, if we need to do that," said Rich Zurek, Mars Exploration Program chief scientist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
Comet Siding Spring, formally named C/2013 A1, was discovered on Jan. 3, 2013, from Australia's Siding Spring Observatory. At the time, it was farther from the sun than Jupiter is. Subsequent observations enabled scientists at JPL and elsewhere to calculate the trajectory the comet will follow as it swings past Mars. Observations in 2014 will continue to refine knowledge of the comet's path, but in approximate terms, Siding Spring's nucleus will come about as close to Mars as one-third of the distance between Earth and the moon.
Comet Ready for Its Close-up
Observations of comet Siding Spring are planned using resources on Earth, orbiting Earth, on Mars and orbiting Mars, and some are already underway. NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and the NEOWISE mission have observed the comet this month both to characterize this first-time visitor from the Oort cloud and to study dust particle sizes and amounts produced by the comet for understanding potential risks to the Mars orbiters. Infrared imaging by NEOWISE reveals a comet that is active and dusty, even though still nearly three-fourths as far from the sun as Jupiter is. Ground-based observatories such as the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility are also expected to join in as the comet becomes favorably positioned for viewing.
As the comet nears Mars, NASA assets there will be used to study this visitor from distant reaches of the solar system.
"We could learn about the nucleus -- its shape, its rotation, whether some areas on its surface are darker than others," Zurek said.
Researchers using spacecraft at Mars gained experience at trying to observe a different comet in 2013, as comet ISON (formally C/2012 S1) approached Mars. That comet's Mars-flyby distance was about 80 times farther than Siding Spring's will be. Another difference is that ISON continued inward past Mars for nearly two months, briefly becoming visible to some unaided-eye skywatchers on Earth before flying very close to the sun and disintegrating. Siding Spring will reach its closest approach to the sun just six days after its Mars flyby. It won't put on a show for Earth, and it won't return to the inner solar system for about a million years.
At comet Siding Spring's flyby distance, the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter could provide imagery with resolution of dozens of pixels across the diameter of the nucleus. When HiRISE observed comet ISON, the nucleus was less than one pixel across. ISON did not get bright enough to make itself visible to other cameras at Mars that made attempted observations, but Siding Spring could provide a better observation opportunity.
Cameras on the Mars rovers Curiosity and Opportunity might watch for meteors in the sky that would be an indication of the abundance of particles in the comet's tail, though the geometry of the flyby would put most of the meteors in daytime sky instead of dark sky.
"A third aspect for investigation could be what effect the infalling particles have on the upper atmosphere of Mars," Zurek said. "They might heat it and expand it, not unlike the effect of a global dust storm." Infrared-sensing instruments on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and Odyssey might be used to watch for that effect.
Assessing Possible Hazards to Mars Orbiters
One trait Siding Spring shares with ISON is unpredictability about how much it will brighten in the months before passing Mars. The degree to which Siding Spring brightens this spring will be an indicator of how much hazard it will present to spacecraft at Mars.
"It's way too early for us to know how much of a threat Siding Spring will be to our orbiters," JPL's Soren Madsen, Mars Exploration Program chief engineer, said last week. "It could go either way. It could be a huge deal or it could be nothing -- or anything in between."
The path the nucleus will take is now known fairly well. The important unknowns are how much dust will come off the nucleus, when it will come off, and the geometry of the resulting coma and tail of the comet.
During April and May, the comet will cross the range of distances from the sun at which water ice on a comet's surface typically becomes active -- vaporizing and letting dust particles loose. Dust ejected then could get far enough from the nucleus by October to swarm around Mars.
"How active will Siding Spring be in April and May? We'll be watching that," Madsen said. "But if the red alarm starts sounding in May, it would be too late to start planning how to respond. That's why we're doing what we're doing right now."
Two key strategies to lessen risk are to get orbiters behind Mars during the minutes of highest risk and to orient orbiters so that the most vulnerable parts are not in the line of fire.
The Martian atmosphere, thin as it is, is dense enough to prevent dust from the comet from becoming a hazard to NASA's two Mars rovers active on the surface. Three orbiters are currently active at Mars: NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) and Mars Odyssey, and the European Space Agency's Mars Express. Two more departed Earth in late 2013 and are due to enter orbit around Mars about three weeks before the comet Siding Spring flyby: NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) and India's Mars Orbiter Mission.
Orbiters are designed with the risk of space-dust collisions in mind. Most such collisions do not damage a mission. Design factors such as blanketing and protected placement of vulnerable components help. Over a five-year span for a Mars orbiter, NASA figures on a few percent chance of significant damage to a spacecraft from the background level of impacts from such particles, called meteoroids. Whether the Siding Spring level will pack that much hazard -- or perhaps greater than 10 times more -- into a few hours will depend on how active it becomes.
This comet is orbiting the sun in almost the opposite direction as Mars and the other planets. The nucleus and the dust particles it sheds will be travelling at about 35 miles (56 kilometers) per second, relative to the Mars orbiters. That's about 50 times faster than a bullet from a high-powered rifle and double or triple the velocity of background meteoroid impacts.
Cautionary Preparations
If managers choose to position orbiters behind Mars during the peak risk, the further in advance any orbit-adjustment maneuvers can be made, the less fuel will be consumed. Advance work is also crucial for the other main option: reorienting a spacecraft to keep its least-vulnerable side facing the oncoming stream of comet particles. The safest orientation in terms of comet dust may be a poor one for maintaining power or communications.
"These changes would require a huge amount of testing," Madsen said. "There's a lot of preparation we need to do now, to prepare ourselves in case we learn in May that the flyby will be hazardous."
JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, manages the NASA's Mars Exploration Program for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. For more information about the flyby of Mars by comet Siding Spring
Add a comment...

Barry Schwartz

Shared publicly  - 
 
+Danny Sullivan has been writing about search for 18+ years now.  Wow.
I've been writing about search for over 10 years now but Danny Sullivan yesterday celebrated his 18th year anniversary of covering search. Danny posted the accomplishment on Google+ saying,
21
2
William Rock's profile photoRuchi Pardal's profile photo
 
Big Achievement... Congrats +Danny Sullivan 
Add a comment...

Barry Schwartz

Shared publicly  - 
 
Google is showing a decline in the number of clicks on ads for the first time in...
6
2
Robert O'Haver's profile photoJeff Neilson's profile photoSEO Reseller's profile photo
 
Interesting I wonder if the quality of the clicks increased?
Add a comment...

Barry Schwartz

Shared publicly  - 
 
Google seems to have +Android cleaning robots roaming around the office in darkness. 
I am sure you all heard of the Roomba, well, it looks like Google, at least in the Dublin office, has an Android looking version of the roomba. Android cleaning robots seem to roam the hallways at Go
15
4
Robert O'Haver's profile photoChris Vukin's profile photoPete Meyers's profile photoBoris Krumov's profile photo
2 comments
 
Two words: Chopping Mall.
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
77,403 people
Work
Occupation
CEO & Search Blogger
Employment
  • Search Engine Roundtable
    Executive Editor, 2003 - present
  • Search Engine Land
    News Editor, 2009 - present
  • RustyBrick
    CEO, 1994 - present
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
New York
Previously
Jerusalem
Story
Tagline
Search Geek & CEO of RustyBrick
Introduction

Barry Schwartz is Search Engine Land's News Editor and has covered search news for over five years. Barry also maintains the Search Engine Roundtable, his own search blog that tracks discussions at the most active search engine forums. As the host of Search Marketing Expo Israel and a speaker at many search marketing conferences, Barry is always on top of the most important topics in search. He also was the former News Editor at Search Engine Watch, hosts a weekly video cast named Search Buzz Recap and is a moderator at several popular search marketing forums.

Barry is often quoted in publications such as Forbes, Reuters, Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Bloomberg, News.com, Publish and more. With five years of writing about search marketing tips and how search engines work, Barry has been called the hardest working blogger in search. Barry maintains a personal blog named Cartoon Barry and can be followed on Twitter here.

Mr. Schwartz is the CEO of RustyBrick, a New York Web service firm specializing in customized online technology that helps companies decrease costs and increase sales. RustyBrick sells custom web software including advanced e-commerce, custom content management systems, social networking sites, CRM applications, custom web-based business software, iPhone applications and much more.

Education
  • Baruch College
    Marketing Research, 1999 - 2002
Basic Information
Gender
Male