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Barney Doan
Attends Liberty University
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Looks like Motorola went with improving the internals. The externals don't look too far removed from the old 360 + SteelConnect adapters. I don't mind the flat tire with the ambient light sensor. I liked that feature. And if I'm correct, it's still the only watch that has wireless charging. Huge win in my opinion.

And... it will work with the iPhone (so will the old 360 though)...
 
Two sizes, three models, and lots of customization are Motorola's game this year. 
Last year, Motorola released the first smartwatch that truly turned heads, the Moto 360. A round watch in a sea of squares, the 360 looked great and became the poster child for Android Wear. But it...
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Thanks Auctmarts for the Repsol Replica fairings. The fitment wasn't great and there were chipped and cracked paint.  But for the price, it can't be beat! 
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A little late to the game, but picked up a SteelConnect for the 360, along with a black, alligator leather band with deployment clasp. Looks more like a watch now!

+Steel Connect​
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I put my name on the backorder list they are out of stock with expected availability in 2-5 weeks
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First Drive: 2014 WRX STI

Ever since I could remember, I have been a Honda guy. Hondas are good cars. My dad, who's a certified Honda mechanic, properly engrained that notion long before I even sniffed a driver's license. So, when it was time for my first car, I picked up a 1987 Honda Civic. It had no A/C, no defroster and made 87 hp at the crank. Every morning, on the way to school, I would tear through the neighborhood streets, wringing the life out of that car for every bit of speed it had. Trust me, it didn't have much, and it wasn't terribly fun to drive. That Honda was followed by a string of other Hondas: a '99 Honda Civic Coupe (right at the height of the tuner craze), an '03 Honda CBR600RR (a lead pig of 600cc motorcycles), an '06 Honda Element (I actually liked this car a lot, but it was out of character) and finally, an '11 Honda Pilot (this is now the wife's car). Here's the thing with Hondas: they're not particularly great at any one thing; they're just good across all things. Reliable -- yes. Easy to work on -- absolutely. Fun? Not in the least.

So, when we were looking for a new car, we happened to have rented a VW Golf (MKV body style). Wow! What a revelation. Were cars supposed to be this great to drive? Here’s an economy car along the lines of a Civic, but it was actually a hoot to drive around. It was so good, it left a lasting impression that eventually parlayed us into the world of German automotives. Soon thereafter, we picked up an '09 VW GTI, much to the dismay (and caution) of my father (remember, he’s a mechanic). But with a 200 bhp, turbocharged 2.0L motor, mated to a snickety-snick fast DSG paddle-style gear box (basically, a Golf amplified) in a hot little hatch, it was too tempting to pass up. It was so easy to drive fast and it handled so beautifully. And for the first 50,000 miles, it was pure love. 

But then, it happened... German engineering at its worst. After its 50K mile birthday, the problems began rolling in. There were so many problems that I kept a running list of no less than 20 separate and distinct issues with the car; each of these issues required diagnosis, repair and/or replacement. When the ABS control module, front door module and water pump all failed in the span of three days, we finally called it quits. We were losing out on opportunity costs – missed days at work, money for labor and repairs, etc. It was bittersweet because, oh, GTI, you were so fun to drive, but ownership was so absolutely burdensome. Remember, this is particularly so in the context of having owned a litany of Hondas.

So, why drag you, the reader, through all this history? Context. Tired of the VW's issues, I was looking for something that would remind me of some of that Japanese reliability, but provide the "fun to drive" quotient of the GTI's turbo and race-bred heritage. 

Enter the Subaru WRX STI.

I picked up a 2014 used STI from a dealer. The car only had roughly 8,000 miles and was still well within its factory warranty. It was the Limited version with all the options loaded into it. The only option it didn’t carry was a cargo tray and cargo net. There were many compelling reasons to pick up this car, not in the least that this particular dealer was willing to give me a great price on the GTI as a trade in. SOLD! “Anything to get that car off my hands,” I thought. With a CarFax report showing over 20 visits for repairs, the VW was also involved in one accident (not my fault), so, when they offered a good price on the STI and the GTI trade in, it was a no-brainer decision. 

The STI packs 305 bhp, mated to a short 6 speed manual transmission. For those who don't know, the STI is born of Subaru's rally race history. The car is equipped with a state-of-the-art AWD system that's way too complicated for me to explain here. Needless to say, this car has the kind of pedigree that should net pure enjoyment. And while it's no VW (in terms of reliability), it is to be expected that it's no Honda either. I am not under any kind of pretense that the Subaru pictured here has anywhere near the kind of reliability that a Honda might have. Yet, with crossed fingers, I hope it's better than the VW. So, what's it like to drive? 

If you can’t tell, this is the sedan version of the STI, which is much more attainable than its hatchback sibling. Being the sedan variant, it does have the ridiculous rally wing in the back. It literally looks like it rolled off the rally race course and into my driveway. It’s not subtle, in the least. When asked about the car, I have gotten used to saying that it's a bit "sore thumb-ish." It sticks out. It's clear what this car was intended to do and be. What it is not is a sleeper. And yet, here's the thing:

With all the stuff that's going on under the hood, between the wheels and on the inside of the car (seats, gauges, steering wheel)... it's not that fun to drive. The steering, while direct and darty, feels completely disconnected from what's going on on the road. I turn the wheel and the car steers (quickly), but there's no communication telling me anything other than the car has changed direction. Then there’s the size. The car not only looks and is bigger than the GTI, most importantly, it feels bigger. The car feels like it's pitching a lot, from side to side, when you throw it into a turn. Yet, I know, from what I see out the front window, it's planted and sure footed. Speaking of pitching, I’m not sure why it pitches so much, given the turn-in is so soft. I almost want to get beefier front sway bars and revised bushings just to tighten up that turn-in. The car rotates differently about its axis as well. I can't tell if that's a different thing or a good thing.

Don't get me wrong. The car is scary powerful, but there's a good amount of turbo lag that delays the onset of that rush. I could easily convince myself that this is a good thing, what with my lead foot and all. And while those 300+ horses are there to play when the turbo is on full spool, I feel like that delay is part of the reason I answer, "Eh," and shrug my shoulders, when asked, “Is it fun?” The boosted steering, the lagging turbo, the soft turn-in, they all serve to reinforce this disconnected feeling in the car. I know the ECU is doing stuff to keep the car nice and tidy, but where's the joy in that? It’s like when I got stuck in the snow with the GTI and the traction control was working overtime to keep from spinning the wheels. Just let me modulate the throttle so I can get us out of here!

On paper and from just walking around the car, there's so much to love and like about this car. I won't lie and say I don't get a bit excited, in the morning, to jump in and drive it. I won't lie and say I don't get a little giddy like a young school boy when I fire up the motor and hear that boxer engine rumble. But then, I put it in first gear and give it a little gas and all that excitement fades away. In a way, while aiming for some of that Japanese reliability I got from a Honda and the “fun to drive” quotient I got from a VW, I ended up picking up a car that lands squarely on a whole other page of its own. It's not a Honda, in terms of reliability. It's definitely not German in terms of the “ultimate driving machine.” I feel like I’m beginning to understand the Subaru culture and what other Subaru owners have been saying about their second, third, and fourth owned Subaru. It’s not any of those other car makes. No…

It's a Subaru.
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+Eric Shen When my dad saw my STI, he actually sighed relief. When I told him about VW's plastic water pump, he said that it's historically known that VW water pumps have high failure rates. He said as terrible as American cars are, their metal constructed water pumps last virtually forever. Someone appropriately called it "planned obsolescence." As I learn how to drive the STI more effectively, it's getting to be a bit better. The reason I didn't get another GTI is, in part, because there are ZERO GTIs being sold in my area with a VIN starting with W. All of the GTIs in my area have VINs starting with 3 (i.e. Mexico), which means up to 16% of the materials and parts used are made in Mexico. Sorry, but no thanks. The W was bad enough. 3 is worse. You'll be hard-pressed to find one made in Germany. Reliability on the MK7 is not any better. My buddy's MK7 had a front strut failure the first week of his ownership.
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Barney Doan

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Ministry or Disciple-Making?

So how do you know if you are making disciples instead of just doing ministry? Here are a few questions to ask yourself:

1.Who in your church is making disciples? What are their names? If you can’t name the people who are making disciples, it’s probably not happening.

2. Do those you have named as disciple makers know that they are making disciples? If they don’t know they are making disciples, it’s probably not happening.

3. What are the names of the people who are being discipled by those disciple makers? If the disciple makers can’t name the people they are discipling, then discipleship is probably not happening.

4. Do the people who are being discipled by those disciple makers know they are being discipled by them? If not, then discipleship is probably not happening. The 12 disciples knew they were being discipled by Jesus.

5. How do you know when the one who is making disciples has actually made a disciple? If you don’t know how to answer this question, then discipleship is likely not happening. Jesus said in John 17 that he had finished the work the Father had given him to do. He knew when his work with the 12 was completed.

If you don’t know how to answer these questions, then you are likely not making disciples the way that Jesus made disciples.

http://thev3movement.org/2015/03/ministry-at-the-cost-of-discipleship/
As I talk with various church leaders, I am discovering a common misunderstanding about the difference between ministry and disciple making.
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Get an Accessport for Your WRX/STI Right Now

For a long time, I've watched and admired the cars that made rally racing popular. Certainly, along the lines the American muscle car rivalry of Mustang v. Camaro, the WRX STI v EVO has been a longstanding one. When the Lancer Evolution VIII debuted in America in 2003, Mitsubishi brought the rivalry stateside, going toe-to-toe with the "blob-eye" WRX/STI. Since then, I've secretly coveted one of these machines, although always favoring the EVO for its sharper handling, despite its rather pedestrian (rental car) interior quality. 

So, when the opportunity to pick up an STI popped up (and a very strong desire to rid myself of the VW GTI curse), only a few things had to align in order for me to be convinced to get one. After some negotiating, I picked up a 2014 Subaru STI. However, what I didn't realize (because I didn't do enough research or forum stalking) is that my "dream car" was a ticking time bomb, as a result of compliance with federal emissions and fuel mileage regulations.

Doing what most enthusiasts do, I joined the forums (in this case, NASIOC) and began reading up on my car. Immediately, the horror stories came front and center (as they usually do; people tend to talk more about what's going wrong than what's going right). As I understand it, Subaru did two major things that crippled the car:

1) The changed the recommendations with regards to kind of oil to be used in the motor. Not only did they remove the language that would allow the use of more viscous motor oils (typical of high performance, force induced motors), but they recommended a resource conserving oil. The Subaru factory recommendation is for the use of RC 5W-30 synthetic oil in the EJ motor. Problem is, even the recommended factory oil, by way of oil analysis, can be sheared down to a 20 weight oil. This "thinness" is completely unacceptable for the lubrication of rod bearings in this potent motor. As a result, many owners have gone on to use a Euro-spec 5W-30 to stay within warranty guidelines or have bucked the warranty risk and gone with a heavier 5W-40. The popular oil is a tractor oil -- Shell's Rotella T6.

2) The second crippling thing that Subaru did was ship these high performance machines with terrible stock ECU tunes. The most troubling aspect of this tune is how critically close Subaru runs the air:fuel ratio (AFR) at peak torque and boost. As you can imagine, running a lean mixture at that point can lead to catastrophic results. The potential for premature detonation, made known by the tell-tale "knock," is high.

Just as owners can take matters into their own hands by running a more viscous oil, the reasonable solution for resolving the terrible stock ECU tune is this:

Buy a #CobbTuning Accessport

Certainly, you can (and probably should) get a professional tune for the uniqueness of your car, especially if you've gone about making modifications to your car. However, if you are looking for a cost-effective solution, Cobb's Accessport (AP) is the best option out there. I want to stress that if you plan on driving your car anywhere near what these cars were built to do, you should get an AP. However, anecdotally, even if you're driving like a grandma in your 300+-hp STI, it doesn't preclude you from having issues; although, I will say that having an AP doesn't preclude you either, but the potential is reduced.

So, even if you're stock (like me), an AP provides great benefit. First, it shortens the delay period between closed loop and open loop fueling. Second, it improves the AFR at full torque and full boost to a safer value -- roughly around 11-12. Third, it improves drivability of the car. Everyone who has an STI knows about the little burble around 2,500 rpms. With an AP, it's gone. Throttle response lag is gone, but isn't abrupt like it is in S# mode. Overall, an AP Stage 1 (for a stock intake, stock exhaust) makes the car feel and drive like it should have from the factory. 

Recommendation: If you own a WRX/STI and are debating whether or not you should pick up an AP, don't think about it anymore. Buy one today! It's one of the best things that you can do to safely operate your vehicle in the manner that it was intended and built for.

(5 stars)
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Lots of fun until your motor explodes. I suppose the fun (money permitting) would be in the rebuild process and getting things done wrong, done the right way. We'll see. Hoping for it to be stable for a few years.
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Is there a watch face that utilizes the compass feature to alter the shadows on the watch face?
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Cool I'll be on the lookout for it.
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"Tell me. Do you bleed?... You will."

That's Batman, speaking to Superman, in this leaked trailer.

https://vid.me/NlzG
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This is the coolest thing EVAR!
Google Handwriting Input allows you to handwrite text on your phone or tabl...
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Heard this on a commercial recently: "Though the causes are unknown, some chemicals in the brain may be involved." 

How much confidence would you have with any statement following that preface?
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+Google Chrome​ needs a material design makeover. I shouldn't have to reach the top right corner on these huge phones to start a new tab or other stuff. #makeithappen
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As much as I dislike Samsung, mostly because of software, I would DEFINITELY be interested in picking up a Samsung Galaxy S6 GPe (Google Play edition). Wouldn't you?

Seriously +Samsung Mobile USA  make this GPe happen!

+Google Play 
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Indeed, my Nexus 5 is running well.
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In his circles
296 people
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    Seminary, present
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I don't know how to put this but I'm kind of a big deal.
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Husband. Father. Seminary Student. Praise Leader. Youth Minister. Motorcycle Track Enthusiast.
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Went here for a simple oil and filter change. Came away with more knowledge about my car than when I came in. These guys are helpful, nice and knowledgeable. Looking forward to continued relationship with these guys. Major thanks to Riyaad and Joe who helped me out!
Public - a month ago
reviewed a month ago
Dr. Hope performed a microdiscectomy on my L5-S1. He was absolutely wonderful. Would highly recommend this highly rated physician. If you're going to have this kind of surgery, it's best to get it done by an neurosurgeon rather than an orthopedist.
Public - 5 months ago
reviewed 5 months ago
Always good here. Love Ledo's.
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
Most authentic Vietnamese restaurant in the area. The closest stuff to my mom's cooking. Cha gio is very good. They also do banh mi as well as bun dishes.
Food: ExcellentDecor: ExcellentService: Excellent
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
6 reviews
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I want to personally thank and appreciate the folks in the Pre-Owned Sales department; in particular, Tommy Dorsey and Jennifer Carrel. Having sold cars, I can tell you that these two are two of the best sales people I've ever been around. They truly understand the value of customer service by actually serving the customer, rather than treating them like a number (or an "up" to be converted). I purchased a 2014 Subaru from them and needed to trade in my 2009 VW. Tommy and Jennifer worked tirelessly, through the late night, to hammer out a reasonable deal for me. All wasn't perfect with the car though. When I drove the car off the lot, I had noticed some tire noise that hadn't dissipated after a week of driving. Tommy and Jennifer arranged for the car to be looked at under the TB4L program -- extended not to just new cars, but their pre-owned cars as well. Upon determining that there was indeed an issue with the tires, Tommy and Jennifer went above and beyond AGAIN, by reimbursing me the purchase for replacement tires! Who does that? I also have to make special commendation of the Service Department, in particular, Dino Muller. When I brought the car in to inspect the issue, his well-mannered, polite and knowledgeable disposition made the entire process a pleasure. How many places can you say that about? Ted Britt Chevrolet in Chantilly has an extremely warm, cooperative and servicing staff. I would HIGHLY recommend going there for you next car purchase, finance and service! Thank you, Ted Britt Chevrolet for making my first pre-owned car purchase a pleasant experience! May more business come your way!
• • •
Public - 5 months ago
reviewed 5 months ago
Had the spicy coconut noodle soup and it was decent. Light on the meat. Wife had the Wagamama ramen and she said it was decent. Kids had the grilled noodle with chicken and the chicken was terribly dry. Overall it was above average.
Food: Very GoodDecor: ExcellentService: Good
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago