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Backing the Future: Exploring crowdfunding from a backer's perspective
Backing the Future focuses on crowdfunding from the backer's perspective.
Backing the Future focuses on crowdfunding from the backer's perspective.
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Backing the Future: Exploring crowdfunding from a backer's perspective's posts

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There are three main reasons why a project creator would opt to crowdfund instead of going to a bank or Wall Street for money for their business, namely that the project creator: is too small in size to access main-stream funding sources; doesn’t have to…

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Understand and then target the two drivers influencing backers when you design a #crowdfunding campaign.

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Great insight from Seth on understanding your audience:

"It turns out that activating people who already like you is far more productive and profitable than it is to spend time and money yelling at people who are ignoring you."

This is applicable to the crowdfunding industry because repeat backers give more money to project creators and platforms, in comparison to once-off backers.

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Nice series of crowdfunding basics from +Mike McGannon.
Crowdfunding 101: Part 1 Get Involved in Your Community

I think a number of Crowdfunding project creators are forgetting the most important step in their campaigns and that is getting involved in their respective communities and building a crowd. By community I don’t mean just their local community, but their community for the project category.
Using Kickstarter as example there are 13 categories and 36 subcategories and they are: Art, Comics, Dance, Design, Fashion, Film and Video, Food, Games, Music, Photography, Publishing, Technology and Theater.
For example, if you’re planning on launching a project for a new video game, then you need to be involved in that industry/community and that means talking to people who buy and play games as well as the industry side comprised of designers, publishers, manufacturers, distributors and retailers. It also includes the media supporting this community: magazine publishers, bloggers, podcasters, and those who promote the industry. People in the community can be found online, at local game stores and clubs and of course at conventions across the country.
It’s in this community where you are going to find the majority of supporters, sure you may have some support from your immediate family and circle of friends, but if you need 1000s of supporters to meet your target funding goal and complete your project, then you have to tap into your community.

The game community is certainly unique in that these groups overlap and that creates an opportunity for designers to connect with their potential customers at a level which is unheard of in most industries. Most consumer goods manufacturers spend millions of dollars each year on market research, focus groups, etc. to try and figure out what their customers want. The wealth of sites in the game community provides that same insight, without the need for a large marketing budget. The cost in this case is your active participation in the community.
Community building 101, don’t be a Spammer
Before you simply join any new forum website or group page, take some time, introduce yourself and participate in discussions, before you every mention anything about your project. Yes it takes time, but that’s part of being involved in your community. Take a moment, step back and introduce yourself, fill out your user profile, tell people your story, why you are interested in games, game design and then talk about your latest project.
If you want people to become interested in your Crowdfunding campaign, they need a reason. Anyone can simply go to the store or shop online and buy a game, but with Crowdfunding you have the opportunity to get people involved in your project, build a fan base and your own sub-community around the project.
This applies to any project category even if you don’t have a group in your local area; there are plenty of options to connect with people online all over the world that share your interests and more importantly maybe interested in supporting your project.

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A Kickstarter project creator I backed delayed shipping the rewards due to packaging. This decision made me wonder: how important is packaging for rewards in crowdfunded projects, and is it ever okay to delay shipment due to packing?

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Inside Cards Against Humanity: 48 hours with Max Temkin: https://www.kickstarter.com/stories/cah
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