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BBSRC

Basic Biology  - 
 
The Oscars for biologists!

From extending DNA chemistry to programming T-cells that destroy cancer cells... here's a 2-min video of shortlisted finalists for the BBSRC Innovator of the Year award.

Find out about the winners here: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/news/people-skills-training/2016/160519-n-bioscience-impact-innovation-competition-winners-announced/

The award was given at the gala Fostering Innovation award ceremony in London on May 18th 2016, and also included the Excellence with Impact award: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/innovation/maximising-impact/fostering-innovation/

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BBSRC

❖ Science [ general ]  - 
 
The winners of BBSRC’s two innovation and impact competitions were announced at the Fostering Innovation ceremony 18 May.

Innovator of the Year celebrates individuals and small teams who have harnessed the potential of their excellent research to help address real world challenges. BBSRC Excellence with Impact recognises institutions that have developed and delivered a vision for maximising impact alongside institution wide culture change.

BBSRC Innovator of the Year 2016 is Professor Tom Brown, from the University of Oxford for his for high impact serial entrepreneurship in DNA chemistry and outstanding commitment to innovation. BBSRC Excellence with Impact competition was won by the John Innes Centre. University of Glasgow were runners-up.

Winners of both competitions were selected by independent judging panels. Read more about the winners and runners-up here: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/news/people-skills-training/2016/160519-n-bioscience-impact-innovation-competition-winners-announced/


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BBSRC

Cool stuff  - 
 
Video review: from extending DNA chemistry to programming T-cells that destroy cancer cells... who will win UK science funder BBSRC's Innovator of the Year 2016 award?

Here's a 2-minute video digest of the shortlisted finalists, with the presentation due at the Fostering Innovation gala award ceremony in London on May 18 2016.

See more on the finalists here: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/news/people-skills-training/2016/160406-n-innovator-of-the-year-finalists-announced/

And on the Fostering Innovation 2016 event here: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/innovation/maximising-impact/fostering-innovation/

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BBSRC

Life  - 
 
Research has linked bacteria with the development of type I diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is prevalent in children and young adults, and is not connected with diet. At the moment there is no cure, and patients require life-long treatment.

Researchers at Cardiff University found that bacteria could be triggering the immune system to destroy the cells that produce insulin. The new discovery, made using super powerful X-rays, could lead to new ways to diagnose, prevent, and possibly halt type 1 diabetes.

See full press release here: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/news/health/2016/160516-pr-germs-the-cause-of-type-1-diabetes/

Link to paper: Hotspot autoimmune T cell receptor binding underlies pathogen and insulin peptide cross-reactivity
http://dx.doi.org/10.1172/JCI85679



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BBSRC

Medicine  - 
 
For the first time, researchers have devised a method to selectively deliver drugs to a pregnant woman’s placenta without harming the foetus.

University of Manchester scientists, funded by BBSRC and writing in the journal Science Advances, have demonstrated that two peptides originally used to target tumours selectively, will perform the same function on a placenta, delivering drugs which improve placental function and benefit the growing baby without causing it harm.

See the full press release here: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/news/health/2016/160506-pr-first-safe-way-to-deliver-drugs-to-the-placenta/

And the paper here: Tumour homing peptides as tools for targeted delivery of payloads to the placenta, King et al, Scientific Advances, 6 May 2016: Vol. 2, no. 5, e1600349 http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/2/5/e1600349
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BBSRC

Life  - 
 
Bees research shows not all neonicotinoids are the same

A new study has found that one of the neonicotinoid insecticides – clothianidin – did not show the same detrimental effects on bee colonies as its close chemical relatives imidacloprid and thiamethoxam. All three neonicotinoids have been subject to an EU-wide moratorium on their use.

The research was undertaken at the University of Dundee and the University of St Andrews, and funded under the Insect Pollinators Initiative: http://ht.ly/4nexEK

Read more in the full press release:
http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/news/food-security/2016/160429-pr-bees-research-shows-not-neonicotinoids-the-same/

And the paper: Neonicotinoids target distinct nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and neurons, leading to differential risks to bumblebees www.nature.com/articles/srep24764
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4 comments
 
+BBSRC What I mean is that pro & anti nicotinoids share partial results supporting their side.
Obviously, we want to save pollinators.
Meanwhile farmers are getting mad, not being able to have a secured production, because alternatives are worse, or don't exist...
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BBSRC

Life  - 
 
Got a good nose for science? Genes that drive the shape of human noses have been identified by a study at University College London, funded by BBSRC.

The four genes mainly affect the width and ‘pointiness’ of noses that vary greatly between different populations. The new information may help contribute to forensic DNA technologies that build visual profiles based on an individual’s genetic makeup.

The study, published in Nature Communications, analysed a population of over 6,000 people with varied ancestry across Latin America to study the differences in normal facial features and identify the genes which control the shape of the nose and chin.

Paper ref: A genome-wide association scan implicates DCHS2, RUNX2, GLI3, PAX1 and EDAR in human facial variation
http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2016/160519/ncomms11616/full/ncomms11616.html

Full press release: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/news/fundamental-bioscience/2016/160519-pr-genes-for-nose-shape-found/


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BBSRC

Discussion  - 
 
Grants totalling £9.5M have been announced by the Medical Research Council (MRC) as part of a cross-Council initiative to tackle antimicrobial resistance (AMR).

The awards together mark one of the biggest investments into AMR since the initiative launched and will use new technology to exploit natural compounds, develop a tool to offer better and faster diagnostics, and explore how the body’s own immune system can be boosted to fight infection.

The latest round of awards has been funded by the MRC, BBSRC, EPSRC and ESRC through the AMR cross-Council initiative, established in 2014. 
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BBSRC

Biology (General)  - 
 
From extending DNA chemistry to programming T-cells that destroy cancer cells... who will win BBSRC's Innovator of the Year 2016 award?

Here's a 2-minute video digest of the shortlisted finalists, with the presentation due at the gala Fostering Innovation award ceremony in London on May 18th 2016.

See more on the finalists here: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/news/people-skills-training/2016/160406-n-innovator-of-the-year-finalists-announced/

And on the Fostering Innovation 2016 event here: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/innovation/maximising-impact/fostering-innovation/

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BBSRC

Popular Science  - 
 
How can you tell if an animal is 'happy' or 'sad'? This new video feature from BBSRC takes a look at how new technologies are being used in animal welfare research.

The 3min video shows footage from real experiments where the viewer has to guess which is the 'happy' and which is the 'sad' animal (yes, it's acknowledged that these are simplistic concepts). It's designed to be fun and engaging, and to spark interest in a topic than many people don't think about too much.

The research is funded by BBSRC, and the feature goes onto explain with links and further references how new technologies, from minature sensors to heat-sensitive cameras, could help animal welfare research. Work at the universities of Liverpool, Glasgow, Lincoln, as well as Writtle college and Scotland's Rural College is featured.

Video link: https://youtu.be/4pg0PvarQhA

Output paper: Skin temperature reveals the intensity of acute stress, Physiology & Behavior, Volume 152, Part A, 1 December 2015, Pages 225–230
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.physbeh.2015.09.032

Full feature on BBSRC website: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/news/food-security/2016/160510-f-how-can-you-tell-if-an-animal-is-happy-or-sad/

Further links on work ongoing and completed by BBSRC in this area can be found at the bottom of the feature.

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BBSRC

❖ Science [ general ]  - 
 
Scientists: want to help decide what science gets funded?

Serving on a Committee provides useful insight into the grant funding process, offers an opportunity to be involved in the support of cutting edge research, and will be beneficial in the preparation of future grant proposals for those who serve.

Find out more, including with video testimonials, here: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/about/structures/committees/committee-pool-membership/
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BBSRC

MASTER RESEARCHS  - 
 
Scientists at have pioneered a new gene-detecting technology which could lead to the creation of a new elite variety of wheat with durable resistance to disease.

The new technology, called ‘MutRenSeq’, accurately pinpoints the location of disease resistance genes in large plant genomes. It has reduced the time it takes to clone these genes in wheat from 5-10 years down to just two.

Effective use of these resistance genes in wheat could increase global yields and vastly reduce the need for agro-chemical applications.

See press release for more details: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/news/food-security/2016/160427-pr-gene-detecting-tech-brings-resilient-superwheat-closer/


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We are the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC). Our aim is to further scientific knowledge, to promote economic growth, wealth and job creation and to improve quality of life in the UK and beyond.
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