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BBSRC

Life  - 
 
Current concepts on how stress hormones act on the brain may need to be reassessed, according to new research.

It is thought that disturbances in the action of stress hormones play a key role in causing mental disorders, like major depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Learning to cope with stressful events is known to require changes in the expression of genes in the hippocampus, a limbic brain region involved in learning and memory. Such changes in gene expression are brought about by stress-induced glucocorticoid hormones acting via receptors that can directly bind to genes and alter their expression.

Read more in the full press release:
http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/news/health/2016/160926-pr-stress-hormone-effects-on-brain/

And the full paper: Acute stress enhances heterodimerization and binding of corticosteroid receptors at glucocorticoid target genes in the hippocampus
http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2016/09/20/1605246113.full
Investing in world-class bioscience research and training on behalf of the UK public.
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BBSRC

Life  - 
 
Scientists use new techniques to uncover hidden secrets of plant stem development.

The limitations of current live-imaging techniques mean typically only easily accessible parts of plants can be accurately visualised.

Researchers from the John Innes Centre, which receives strategic funding from BBSRC, have pioneered innovative new cell imaging techniques to shed light on cells hidden deep inside the meristem. This new development has made it possible to explore further below the outer surface of plants and has uncovered how a key gene controls stem growth.

Read more in the press release: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/news/fundamental-bioscience/2016/160922-pr-new-techniques-uncover-hidden-secrets-plant-stem-development/

And in the paper: Control of oriented tissue growth through repression of organ boundary genes promotes stem morphogenesis
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1534580716305883

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BBSRC

Popular Science  - 
 
Machine learning can predict strains of bacteria likely to cause food poisoning outbreaks.

Researchers at The University of Edinburgh’s The Roslin Institute used software that compares genetic information from bacterial samples isolated from both animals and people.The software learns the DNA signatures that are associated with E. coli samples that have caused outbreaks of infection in people. It can then pick out the animal strains that have these signatures, which are therefore likely to be a threat to human health.

Read the full press release here: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/news/health/2016/160920-pr-computers-learn-spot-deadly-food-poisoning-bacteria/

The Roslin Institute receives strategic funding from BBSRC.
Investing in world-class bioscience research and training on behalf of the UK public.
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BBSRC

Water  - 
 
Ever seen a mussel farm before? Who new they were so pretty? Check out this new 1min video trailer about the ShellEye project, which is using satellite data to help Shellfish farmers combat the twin threats posed by natural algal blooms and E.coli outbreaks.
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BBSRC

Discussion  - 
 
Hello Nutrition and Health community! We've just launched a new Insight on Overconsumption and Diet, and the video below introduces the topic.

You can find our more on the associated blog post on the Global Food Security (GFS) programme website: http://www.foodsecurity.ac.uk/blog/2016/08/eyeing-up-intake-an-insight-on-overconsumption-and-diet/

The GFS programme is administered by UK bioscience funders BBSRC.
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BBSRC

Aquaculture News  - 
 
Check out this new 1min video trailer about the ShellEye project, which is using satellite data to help Shellfish farmers combat the twin threats posed by natural algal blooms and E.coli outbreaks. A longer video and in-depth feature will appear on the BBSRC website and YouTube channel soon.
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BBSRC

Space Videos - Only post 1 a day  - 
 
Did you know that satellites can see and track potentially harmful algal blooms from space?

The BBSRC and NERC-funded ShellEye project seeks to help shellfish farmers manage threats from harmful algal blooms and E. coli bacteria. The multi-partner project brings together industry, government and scientists and aims to develop a satellite-based forecasting system to help fishermen and the aquaculture industry.

This could help avoid the worst effects of algal blooms and manage E.coli bacteria, protecting public health, reducing food waste and contributing to the resilience of food systems and the bioeconomy.

Read more here: https://medium.com/@BBSRC/what-can-satellite-data-do-for-aquaculture-48645b89210e#.pl0t2gcb4
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BBSRC

Life  - 
 
What can satellite data do for agriculture?

This short video explains the ShellEye project, which aims to use satellite data to help the aquaculture industry tackle the toxins from algal blooms that can make people ill and cause huge aunts of food waste. In the video we see a shellfish farmer describe his losses, as well as the principle scientists explaining the rationale and details behind the research.

The research is based at Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK, and is funded by BBSRC and NERC. Read more in this feature: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/news/food-security/2016/160921-f-what-can-satellite-data-do-for-aquaculture/

A similar approach by the same team was undertaken in bathing waters and then used in the Scottish salmon farming industry, and a paper on their results is here: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0098300415000114
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BBSRC

Biology (General)  - 
 
Blackouts and water shortages can severely harm a nation’s food security.

Resource allocation tools can help policy makers improve energy access while minimising hunger, says the Stockholm Environment Institute’s Louise Karlberg on the Global Food Security blog. 
Last July, Zambia found itself in the midst of a crippling energy crisis caused by low water levels in the reservoirs for hydropower generation. Load shedding (cutting off supply to parts of the power grid) became the norm, sending politicians into a frenzy because electricity is the lifeblood ...
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BBSRC

Discussion  - 
 
If you like nutrition and food facts, there are plenty to be found in the new Insight: Overconsumption and Diet, and the video below introduces the topic.

Find our more on the associated blog post on the Global Food Security (GFS) programme website: http://www.foodsecurity.ac.uk/blog/2016/08/eyeing-up-intake-an-insight-on-overconsumption-and-diet/

The GFS programme is administered by UK bioscience funders BBSRC.
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BBSRC

Biology (General)  - 
 
Check out this new 1min video trailer about the ShellEye project, which is using satellite data to help shellfish farmers combat the twin threats posed by natural algal blooms and E.coli outbreaks.

A longer video and in-depth feature will appear on the BBSRC website and YouTube channel soon. The project is funded by BBSRC and NERC: www.shelleye.org
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BBSRC

Biology (General)  - 
 
How can we help people make better dietary choices for their health and the planet?

Administered by BBSRC, the Global Food Security (GFS) programme’s Sian Williams introduces a new report.

Read more in the GFS blog here: http://www.foodsecurity.ac.uk/blog/2016/08/eyeing-up-intake-an-insight-on-overconsumption-and-diet/


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your video sucks balls




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We invest in world-class bioscience research and training on behalf of the UK public.
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We are the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC). Our aim is to further scientific knowledge, to promote economic growth, wealth and job creation and to improve quality of life in the UK and beyond.