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Aung Thiha
Works at University of Malaya
Attended University of Malaya
Lives in Kuala Lumpur
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Aung Thiha

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Anyone wish Asimo was open source?
I'm looking for contributors for an open source robotics project.
https://github.com/gunthercox/salvius

I would like to get a few more involved with this project even if it just means code review. If your not familiar with GitHub then this might be a good chance to get acquainted.

Please check it out and let me know your thoughts. I think this project offers a significant opportunity to teach robotics and programming.
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The first selfy? 
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In the previous post (http://goo.gl/xy4fvI), regarding a Google patent for a tiny contact lens camera, one commenter asked how could this be powered. It could easily be powered wirelessly via #energyharvesting or via a tiny battery. I have collated some relevant information on this topic:

Hybrid energy harvesters (solar and vibrations) in 2013 were very small: "The entire harvester has a height of just a few hundred nanometers, with the bulk of the height coming from the 300-nm-tall nanopillars in the solar cell." http://phys.org/news/2013-04-hybrid-energy-harvester-electricity-vibrations.html

Ambient power, July 2013:  "Researchers at the University of Washington have created a new method of wireless networking that allows devices to communicate with each other without batteries or their own source of power." http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/160634-ambient-backscatter-free-energy-harvesting-from-tv-signals-to-power-a-ubiquitous-internet-of-things

Developmental biobatteries for ears were small in 2012; they will become smaller in the future: "They tested the device in guinea pigs, which possess hearing hardware similar in shape and range of function to humans. Electrodes on either side of a natural membrane in the biological battery picked up a fluctuating voltage, and rectified it with power conversion circuitry that was part of an on-board chip. The chip also had a transmitter which relayed a frequency-modulated signal back out to the researchers which gave accurate indication of the inner ear potential." http://www.extremetech.com/electronics/139875-mit-devises-biobattery-that-could-allow-the-human-ear-to-power-its-own-hearing-aid

The Atlantic wrote in 2010: "Our bodies give off a lot of heat. Fujitsu Laboratories has developed a small device that will, when worn on your person, convert that heat into energy. It then stores that energy like a battery for later use. The hybrid device goes a step further, though, by also harvesting energy from sunlight as we walk around outside." http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2010/12/picture-of-the-day-human-energy-harvesting-device/68135/ http://www.fujitsu.com/global/news/pr/archives/month/2010/20101209-01.html

January 2014, Extreme Tech wrote, regarding a sugar powered bio-battery: "The Virginia Tech biobattery uses 13 enzymes, plus air (it’s an air-breathing biobattery), to produce nearly 24 electrons from a single glucose unit. This equates to a power output of 0.8 mW/cm, current density of 6 mA/cm, and energy storage density of 596 Ah/kg. This last figure is impressive, at roughly 10 times the energy density of the lithium-ion batteries in your mobile devices." http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/175137-sugar-powered-biobattery-has-10-times-the-energy-storage-of-lithium-your-smartphone-might-soon-run-on-enzymes

In 2009, ABC Australia described a salt-powered disposable bio-battery: "...scientists in Sweden have created a salt and paper battery that can hold up to one volt of electricity." http://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2009/10/19/2717673.htm

See also, Thin and flexible bio-batteries made of electrospun cellulose-based membranes (2011): http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21055915
(Phys.org) —Devices that harvest energy from the environment require specific environmental conditions; for instance, solar cells and piezoelectric generators require sunlight and mechanical vibration, respectively. Since these conditions don't exist all the time, most energy harvesters don't generate ...
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"On the surface, human babies appear to be miles behind the rest of the animal kingdom. After all, foals can get up and gallop in the first minute of life. Whale calves can instantly swim with their pod. But human babies can’t do much at the start of life.

One reason human infants are so behind the curve is that our gigantic brains have to make it out of our moms’ pelvises (which aren’t terribly large because we walk on two legs). In order for a baby human to come out with the brain development of a baby chimp, we’d have to gestate for 18-21 months, writes zoologist Adolf Portmann."
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What is computational creativity? This post explores the seeming oxymoron of combining computation and creativity, via the search for a definitive definition of computational creativity.
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Let's save the earth? 
The slogan should be "Let's save ourselves".
In the words of George Carlin, "The planet is fine. The people are fucked."
 The environment and life on earth are resilient enough to continue even after severe climate change and nuclear apocalypse. But humans and food sources we depend on are not. 
Saving our current environment is nothing remotely altruistic, it is just applying some long term thinking in our self-preservation instinct, instead of pursuing short term prosperity. 
Happy #earthday  
#substainability     #mybeautifulearth  
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Raspberry eye.
[Roman Rolinsky] wanted to try to do something interesting with his Raspberry Pi and a 2.8" LCD he had laying about... So he made a rather bulky version of Google Glass. We've seen a few examples o...
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Aung Thiha

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In the previous post (http://goo.gl/xy4fvI), regarding a Google patent for a tiny contact lens camera, one commenter asked how could this be powered. It could easily be powered wirelessly via #energyharvesting or via a tiny battery. I have collated some relevant information on this topic:

Hybrid energy harvesters (solar and vibrations) in 2013 were very small: "The entire harvester has a height of just a few hundred nanometers, with the bulk of the height coming from the 300-nm-tall nanopillars in the solar cell." http://phys.org/news/2013-04-hybrid-energy-harvester-electricity-vibrations.html

Ambient power, July 2013:  "Researchers at the University of Washington have created a new method of wireless networking that allows devices to communicate with each other without batteries or their own source of power." http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/160634-ambient-backscatter-free-energy-harvesting-from-tv-signals-to-power-a-ubiquitous-internet-of-things

Developmental biobatteries for ears were small in 2012; they will become smaller in the future: "They tested the device in guinea pigs, which possess hearing hardware similar in shape and range of function to humans. Electrodes on either side of a natural membrane in the biological battery picked up a fluctuating voltage, and rectified it with power conversion circuitry that was part of an on-board chip. The chip also had a transmitter which relayed a frequency-modulated signal back out to the researchers which gave accurate indication of the inner ear potential." http://www.extremetech.com/electronics/139875-mit-devises-biobattery-that-could-allow-the-human-ear-to-power-its-own-hearing-aid

The Atlantic wrote in 2010: "Our bodies give off a lot of heat. Fujitsu Laboratories has developed a small device that will, when worn on your person, convert that heat into energy. It then stores that energy like a battery for later use. The hybrid device goes a step further, though, by also harvesting energy from sunlight as we walk around outside." http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2010/12/picture-of-the-day-human-energy-harvesting-device/68135/ http://www.fujitsu.com/global/news/pr/archives/month/2010/20101209-01.html

January 2014, Extreme Tech wrote, regarding a sugar powered bio-battery: "The Virginia Tech biobattery uses 13 enzymes, plus air (it’s an air-breathing biobattery), to produce nearly 24 electrons from a single glucose unit. This equates to a power output of 0.8 mW/cm, current density of 6 mA/cm, and energy storage density of 596 Ah/kg. This last figure is impressive, at roughly 10 times the energy density of the lithium-ion batteries in your mobile devices." http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/175137-sugar-powered-biobattery-has-10-times-the-energy-storage-of-lithium-your-smartphone-might-soon-run-on-enzymes

In 2009, ABC Australia described a salt-powered disposable bio-battery: "...scientists in Sweden have created a salt and paper battery that can hold up to one volt of electricity." http://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2009/10/19/2717673.htm

See also, Thin and flexible bio-batteries made of electrospun cellulose-based membranes (2011): http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21055915
(Phys.org) —Devices that harvest energy from the environment require specific environmental conditions; for instance, solar cells and piezoelectric generators require sunlight and mechanical vibration, respectively. Since these conditions don't exist all the time, most energy harvesters don't generate ...
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Aung Thiha

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SciTech #ScienceSunday Digest, 16/14.
SCNT embryonic stem cells, universe from nothing, microrobots, nanowire photonics, biological glue, flexible wearables, programmable cells, gecko adhesives.

1. First Embryonic Stem Cells from Adult Human Cells.
Human embryonic stem cells have finally been created with the somatic cell nuclear transfer technique using adult human cells whose nucleus is inserted into an egg cell the nucleus of which has been removed https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2014/04/somatic-cell-nuclear-transfer-achieved-in-adult-human-cells.php. This is how Dolly the sheep was cloned in 1997, and should allow the creation of patient-specific stem cells for use in a range of therapeutic cell therapies. While this is a great advance there exist a number of different methods for achieving the same result such as cellular reprogramming to create induced pluripotent stem cells, and even last week we saw that just two factors were required to induce an adult stem cell to develop into an embryo. 

2. A Universe from Nothing: A Mathematical Foundation.
An interesting result from theoretical physics constitutes the first mathematical proof that the Big Bang could have occured spontaneously from nothing due to quantum fluctuations https://medium.com/the-physics-arxiv-blog/ed7ed0f304a3. The work is based on exploring new solutions to the Wheeler-DeWitt equation, which was originally proposed to combine quantum mechanics with relativity, and also building off Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle. The interesting twist here is (i) that the spontaneous and sustainable emergence of new Universes from nothing is dependent on the cosmological constant, which (ii) has to be replaced with a quantity known as the quantum potential, a quantity that (iii) comes from pilot wave theory (hidden variables interpretation developed by David Bohm), and (iv) implying that the Universe and quantum mechanics are at heart entirely deterministic. This result also reminds me of the “time emerges from entanglement” work https://medium.com/the-physics-arxiv-blog/d5d3dc850933

3. Salt Water Flowing Over Graphene Generates Electricity.
Electricity has been generated from graphene simply by dragging a droplet of salt water over it http://gizmodo.com/pouring-saltwater-over-graphene-generates-electricity-1563379860. When moving along the graphene the electrons in the salt water droplet desorb on one end of the graphene and absorb on the other, generating a tiny voltage that is proportional to the speed of the water; 30mV in the proof-of-concept. This is a tiny voltage and further work remains to be done, but what about powering low-power implanted devices with the flow of salty blood, or building large arrays of the devices for deployment in the ocean to harness wave and current power, or self-powered buoys, etc? 

4. Manufacturing with Microrobots.
An innovative new approach to manufacturing electronics and small structures involves the use of swarms of independently controlled microrobots comprised of magnetic platforms with different manipulator arms or tools on top http://www.technologyreview.com/news/526601/microrobots-working-together-build-with-metal-glass-and-electronics/. This video has a good overview Magnetically Actuated Micro-Robots for Advanced Manipulation Applications. The bots move over a surface with embedded electronic coils, the control of which coordinates the movement and placement of up to 1,000 microrobots to date; different microrobots with different arms/tools are combined together in order to build and assemble more complex structures. Lots of possibilities and it’ll be interesting to see where they take this platform in future - even an automatic Lego builder would be a great demonstration. Work is progressing on controlled movement of nanomachines over surfaces too http://www.nanowerk.com/spotlight/spotid=35196.php

5. Detecting and Emitting Light with a Single Nanowire.
By straining gallium arsenide nanowires IBM can tune the devices to both absorb and emit light, efficiently functioning as single light emitting diodes or photodetectors http://spectrum.ieee.org/nanoclast/semiconductors/optoelectronics/ibm-combines-light-emission-and-detection-in-single-nanowire and opening the possibility to reduce the complexity of nanophotonic chips. Materials strain engineering is a fascinating space where applying different forces to materials alters the atomic bond lengths and spacing, changing symmetries, and opening up novel and sometimes unintuitive electronic and photonic phenomena and applications. 

6. The Benefits of Materials with Precisely Aligned Atoms.
We had a couple examples of such materials this week. First, the demonstration of compound semiconductor materials that comprised semimetal nanowires and nanoparticles made of erbium and antimony embedded into the semiconducting matrix of gallium antimonide http://spectrum.ieee.org/nanoclast/semiconductors/optoelectronics/nanostructures-could-bridge-gap-between-optics-and-electronics. This results in the formation of a perfect and uninterrupted crystal lattice due to the fact that the atoms in the semimetal nanostructures match the pattern of those in the semiconductor, and allows a range of novel optoelectronic phenomena to be harnessed. Second, a new chemical vapour deposition process creates precisely layered van der Waals solids comprised of atomically thin two dimensional materials such as graphene, molybdenum disulfide, boron nitride, and tungsten diselenide that can result in optical and electrical performance improvements two orders of magnitude greater than bulk or single layered materials http://phys.org/news/2014-04-chemical-vapor-deposition-atomic-layer.html

7. Biological Glue and Wound Healing.
Polymer adhesive solutions containing silica and iron oxide nanoparticles have been shown to be extremely effective as “biological glue” http://phys.org/news/2014-04-strategy.html. Proof-of-concept demonstrations included (i) quickly gluing deep wounds on skin within seconds to stop bleeding and create minimal scarring, (ii) repair living organs such as the liver that are difficult to suture, even after resection, and (iii) attach medical devices to living, beating hearts for quicker, more intimate, and less invasive monitoring and diagnosis. The nanoparticles can themselves be metabolised by the animal and these materials offer applications across a broad spectrum of clinical scenarios. 

8. Flexible Adhesive Wearable Devices.
A new wearable electronic patch is flexible, stretchable, adhesive to skin, and incorporates standard silicon chips, microcontrollers, microfluidics, flexible wire designs, and sensors http://singularityhub.com/2014/04/18/new-method-points-to-cheaper-more-flexible-wearable-computers/. The new design pursues a compartmentalised, or modular, design strategy in order to facilitate rapid development and compatibility with a broad range of off-the-shelf components and relevant standards. Stuck to the skin such devices can measure biometric data much more clearly than devices that merely sit (and can jostle) on top of the skin. The group hopes that future versions will be even more user-friendly and allow continuous health monitoring of a large range of different measurements. This could also be a very interesting biohacking platform. 

9. Gecko Skin Adhesives Getting Better.
An improved version of “Geckskin”, a reusable adhesive material that mimics gecko’s ability to stick to surfaces has been developed that can adhere even heavy loads onto vertical surface materials ranging from wood to glass http://phys.org/news/2014-04-versatile-version-geckskin-gecko-like-adhesives.html. A video demonstration can be found here Geckskin on Everything. The fabrication process allows tuning of the material components in order to optimise for different applications, although it’s yet to be seen whether that will be for robotics, spider-man suits, home appliances, etc. 

10. Modular Extracellular Sensor Architecture.
Human cells have been engineered to produce a protein biosensor that sits on the cell surface, which is programmed to sense specific molecules and trigger a corresponding gene expression program in the cell’s nucleus http://www.mccormick.northwestern.edu/news/articles/2014/04/building-smart-cell-based-therapies.html. The idea of course is to use such systems to create programmable therapeutics able to travel through the patient's body to selectively target metabolites, cells, or diseased tissues of interest. The current platform is modular, allowing additional biosensor + gene expression circuits to be added to the same cell and so enabling increasingly sophisticated programs to be built. For example cells could be programmed to turn on a gene when one protein is sensed and not another, allowing cells to specifically kill certain tumour cells.  

SciTech Digest just debuted on Medium too: https://medium.com/@SciTechDigest 

+ScienceSunday, with your hosts +Buddhini Samarasinghe, +Rajini Rao, +Chad Haney, +Robby Bowles, +Allison Sekuler, +Carissa Braun, and +Aubrey Francisco!

+STEM on Google+ Community 
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"A neuroscientist and a musician explain how they built the Brain Stethoscope, which is both brain scanner and musical instrument"
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  • University of Malaya
    PhD candidate, present
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Biomedical Engineer, Researcher, Transhumanist
Introduction


Biomedical engineer,
Transhumanist
Scientist
Philomath

I am a PhD student  and an aspiring scientist with research interests in 
Tissue Engineering, 
Synthetic Biology, 
Lab-on-a-chip , 
BioMEMS , 
Biomedical instrumentation, 
Bionics and 
Brain-Computer Interface --- with the ultimate ambition of becoming a posthuman myself.

My long blogs are at  : www.aungthiha.me
Technology related curation can be found in my Google+ page and Engineering The Cure facebook page



Education
  • University of Malaya
    Master of Engineering (Biomedical), 2010 - 2012
  • University of Malaya
    Bachelor of Biomedical Engineering, 2006 - 2010
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Aung Thiha's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
The Raspberry Eye Sees All
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[Roman Rolinsky] wanted to try to do something interesting with his Raspberry Pi and a 2.8" LCD he had laying about... So he made a rather b

What is Computational Creativity?
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Standalone peer review platforms
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Raising a Moral Child
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Sony Xperia Z2 crowned new king of mobile photography - CNET
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The smartphone has beaten out the Nokia 808 Pureview to take the lead in overall picture quality.

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