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Earth-size Kepler-186f
Illustration Credit: +NASA Ames / SETI Institute / JPL-Caltech, Discovery: Elisa V. Quintana, et al.
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap140419.html

Planet Kepler-186f is the first known Earth-size planet to lie within the habitable zone of a star beyond the Sun. Discovered using data from the prolific planet-hunting Kepler spacecraft, the distant world orbits its parent star, a cool, dim, M dwarf star about half the size and mass of the Sun, some 500 light-years away in the constellation Cygnus. M dwarfs are common, making up about 70 percent of the stars in our Milky Way galaxy. To be within the habitable zone, where surface temperatures allowing liquid water are possible, Kepler-186f orbits close, within 53 million kilometers (about the Mercury-Sun distance) of the M dwarf star, once every 130 days. Four other planets are known in the distant system. All four are only a little larger than Earth and in much closer orbits, also illustrated in the tantalizing artist's vision. While the size and orbit of Kepler-186f are known, its mass and composition are not, and can't be determined by Kepler's transit technique. Still, models suggest that it could be rocky and have an atmosphere, making it potentially the most Earth-like exoplanet discovered so far ...
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mary lemire's profile photoDawn Drover's profile photoS Storch's profile photoFred Schulz's profile photo
29 comments
 
There maybe some sort of life, but the picture we look at here is not real, it is a transcription from someone, who gives a sort of look of how it may look like, so it is only a imaginaring picture......... but nice to see ;-)
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Waterton Lake Eclispe
Image Credit & Copyright: Yuichi Takasaka / TWAN / www.blue-moon.ca
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap140417.html

Recorded on April 15th, this total lunar eclipse sequence looks south down icy Waterton Lake from the Waterton Lakes National Park in Alberta, Canada, planet Earth. The most distant horizon includes peaks in Glacier National Park, USA. An exposure every 10 minutes captured the Moon's position and eclipse phase, as it arced, left to right, above the rugged skyline and Waterton town lights. In fact, the sequence effectively measures the roughly 80 minute duration of the total phase of the eclipse. Around 270 BC, the Greek astronomer Aristarchus also measured the duration of lunar eclipses - though probably without the benefit of digital clocks and cameras. Still, using geometry, he devised a simple and impressively accurate way to calculate the Moon's distance, in terms of the radius of planet Earth, from the eclipse duration. This modern eclipse sequence also tracks the successive positions of Mars, above and right of the Moon, bright star Spica next to the reddened lunar disk, and Saturn to the left and below.
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Lidia Mertiri's profile photoSam Butler's profile photoAntonio Pereira's profile photoGene Castaneda's profile photo
43 comments
 
Stars I snapped photo of looked like aliens not funny
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Mammatus Clouds over Nebraska
Image Credit & Copyright: Jorn Olsen Photography
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap140415.html

When do cloud bottoms appear like bubbles? Normally, cloud bottoms are flat. This is because moist warm air that rises and cools will condense into water droplets at a specific temperature, which usually corresponds to a very specific height. As water droplets grow, an opaque cloud forms. Under some conditions, however, cloud pockets can develop that contain large droplets of water or ice that fall into clear air as they evaporate. Such pockets may occur in turbulent air near a thunderstorm. Resulting mammatus clouds can appear especially dramatic if sunlit from the side. The mammatus clouds pictured above were photographed over Hastings, Nebraska during 2004 June.
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Karen M. W.'s profile photoAmrita Kulshreshtha's profile photoAnnemieke Reffeltrath's profile photogeografia e ensino de geografia's profile photo
53 comments
 
yup
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Saturn in Blue and Gold
Image Credit: Cassini Imaging Team, SSI, +NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, +European Space Agency, ESA, +NASA
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap140413.html

Why is Saturn partly blue? The above picture of Saturn approximates what a human would see if hovering close to the giant ringed world. The above picture was taken in 2006 March by the robot Cassini spacecraft now orbiting Saturn. Here Saturn's majestic rings appear directly only as a thin vertical line. The rings show their complex structure in the dark shadows they create on the image left. Saturn's fountain moon Enceladus, only about 500 kilometers across, is seen as the bump in the plane of the rings. The northern hemisphere of Saturn can appear partly blue for the same reason that Earth's skies can appear blue -- molecules in the cloudless portions of both planet's atmospheres are better at scattering blue light than red. When looking deep into Saturn's clouds, however, the natural gold hue of Saturn's clouds becomes dominant. It is not known why southern Saturn does not show the same blue hue -- one hypothesis holds that clouds are higher there. It is also not known why Saturn's clouds are colored gold.
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Faravahar Homayoun Ir's profile photoRICHARD CAMPBELL's profile photoW Steven's profile photoErwan T's profile photo
19 comments
 
Incroyablement magnifique
 ·  Translate
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Mars near Opposition
Image Credit & Copyright: Fabio Carvalho and Gabriela Carvalho
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap140411.html

Tonight Mars is between opposition (April 8) and closest approach (April 14) looping through the constellation Virgo opposite the Sun in the night sky. That makes it prime season for telescopic views of the the Red Planet, like this one from April 3rd. The clear, sharp image was captured with a high-speed digital camera and 16-inch diameter telescope from Assis, Brazil, Planet Earth. Mars' north polar cap is at the top left. Also visible are whitish orographic clouds - water vapor clouds condensing in the cold atmosphere above the peaks of Mars' towering volcanos. The exact dates of closest approach and opposition are slightly different because of the planet's elliptical orbit. Still, get your telescope out on the night of closest approach (April 14/15) and you can view both Mars and a total eclipse of the Moon. Mars will be about 1/100th the angular size of the Moon.
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S Storch's profile photoJungwook Kim's profile photoyumi szigriszt's profile photoAnnemieke Reffeltrath's profile photo
25 comments
 
Mann I never see it like this luv it
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Red Moon, Green Beam
Image Credit & Copyright: Dan Long (Apache Point Observatory) - Courtesy: Tom Murphy (UC San Diego)
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap140418.html

This is not a scene from a sci-fi special effects movie. The green beam of light and red lunar disk are real enough, captured in the early morning hours of April 15. Of course, the reddened lunar disk is easy to explain as the image was taken during this week's total lunar eclipse. Immersed in shadow, the eclipsed Moon reflects the dimmed reddened light of all the sunsets and sunrises filtering around the edges of planet Earth, seen in silhouette from a lunar perspective. But the green beam of light really is a laser. Shot from the 3.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory in southern New Mexico, the beam's path is revealed as Earth's atmosphere scatters some of the intense laser light. The laser's target is the Apollo 15 retroreflector, left on the Moon by the astronauts in 1971. By determining the light travel time delay of the returning laser pulse, the experimental team from UC San Diego is able to measure the Earth-Moon distance to millimeter precision and provide a test of General Relativity, Einstein's theory of gravity. Conducting the lunar laser ranging experiment during a total eclipse uses the Earth like a cosmic light switch. With direct sunlight blocked, the reflector's performance is improved over performance when illuminated by sunlight during a normal Full Moon, an effect known as the real Full Moon Curse.
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Melody Peters's profile photoEric Armenta's profile photoGene Castaneda's profile photoAnnemieke Reffeltrath's profile photo
38 comments
 
It reminds of the pink Floyd.the wall album
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Spica, Mars, and Eclipsed Moon
Image Credit & Copyright: Damian Peach
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap140416.html

A beautiful, reddened Moon slid through dark skies on April 15, completely immersed in Earth's shadow for well over an hour. It was the year's first total lunar eclipse and was widely enjoyed over the planet's Western Hemisphere. Seen from the Caribbean island of Barbados, the dimmed lunar disk is captured during totality in this colorful skyview. The dark Moon's red color contrasts nicely with bright bluish star Spica, alpha star of the constellation Virgo, posing only about two degrees away. Brighter than Spica and about 10 degrees from the Moon on the right, Mars is near opposition and closest approach to Earth. The Red Planet's own ruddy hue seems to echo the color of the eclipsed Moon.
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Abe Shaker's profile photoJoee Grizzantee's profile photoAnalyn Mapanao's profile photoyumi szigriszt's profile photo
16 comments
 
Reproduction from my desktop monitor so poor image quality. But that
doesn't matter. The point is that Mars is above and west of the moon while
Spica Is slightly below and also west of the moon throughout the entire
eclipse. Stars and planets move through the sky faster than the moon, so as
the night wore on, the distance of space actually increased. Always does.
Enough said. Game over.
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An Unusual Globule in IC 1396
Credit & Copyright: T. Rector (U. Alaska Anchorage) & H. Schweiker (WIYN, NOAO, AURA, NSF)
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap140414.html

Is there a monster in IC 1396? Known to some as the Elephant's Trunk Nebula, parts of gas and dust clouds of this star formation region may appear to take on foreboding forms, some nearly human. The only real monster here, however, is a bright young star too far from Earth to hurt us. Energetic light from this star is eating away the dust of the dark cometary globule near the top of the above image. Jets and winds of particles emitted from this star are also pushing away ambient gas and dust. Nearly 3,000 light-years distant, the relatively faint IC 1396 complex covers a much larger region on the sky than shown here, with an apparent width of more than 10 full moons.
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john tarimo's profile photoS Storch's profile photoFaravahar Homayoun Ir's profile photoLucas Durrett's profile photo
36 comments
 
Amaizin
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Clouds and Crosses over Haleakala
Image Credit & Copyright: Wally Pacholka (TWAN)
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap140412.html

Aloha and welcome to a breathtaking skyscape. The dreamlike panoramic view from March 27 looks out over the 10,000 foot summit of Haleakala on Maui, Hawai'i. A cloud layer seeps over the volcanic caldera's edge with the Milky Way and starry night sky above. Head of the Northern Cross asterism, supergiant star Deneb lurks within the Milky Way's dust clouds and nebulae at the left. From there you can follow the arc of the Milky Way all the way to the stars of the more compact Southern Cross, just above the horizon at the far right. A yellowish Mars is right of center, near the top of the frame, with rival red giant Antares below it, closer to the Milky Way's central bulge. Need some help identifying the stars? Just slide your cursor over the picture, or download this labeled panorama.
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Jonathan Lee's profile photomohammed ali's profile photoBrian Camargo's profile photoFred Schulz's profile photo
32 comments
 
+Jason Roberts .* U know Belibvle in my workshop alright Ameen. Thank touch blessing with of my own fight do promise of Father of heaven. Ameen*
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Mars, Ceres, Vesta
Image Credit & Copyright: Tunç Tezel (TWAN)
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap140410.html

That bright, ruddy star you've recently noticed rising just after sunset isn't a star at all. That's Mars, the Red Planet. Mars is now near its 2014 opposition (April 8) and closest approach (April 14), looping through the constellation Virgo opposite the Sun in planet Earth's sky. Clearly outshining bluish Spica, alpha star of Virgo, Mars is centered in this labeled skyview from early April, that includes two other solar system worlds approaching their opposition. On the left, small and faint asteroid Vesta and dwarf planet Ceres are seen near star Tau Virginis. But you'll just have to imagine NASA's Dawn spacecraft cruising between the small worlds. Having left Vesta in September of 2012, Dawn's ion engine has been steadily driving it to match orbits with Ceres, scheduled to arrive there in February 2015. Of course, you can also look near Mars for the Moon opposite the Sun in Earth's sky on the night of April 14/15 ... and see a total lunar eclipse.
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nasir shaikh's profile photoGod's Garden Of Eden's profile photophilippe roux's profile photoDru Williams's profile photo
24 comments
 
I saw Mars out my back door last night! It's so bright and close right now...
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Discover the cosmos!
Introduction
Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.