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Astronomy Picture of the Day (APoD)
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Apollo 17 at Shorty Crater
Image Credit: Apollo 17 Crew, +NASA
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap150802.html

On the Moon, it is easy to remember where you parked. In December of 1972, Apollo 17 astronauts Eugene Cernan and Harrison Schmitt spent about 75 hours on the Moon in the Taurus-Littrow valley, while colleague Ronald Evans orbited overhead. This sharp image was taken by Cernan as he and Schmitt roamed the valley floor. The image shows Schmitt on the left with the lunar rover at the edge of Shorty Crater, near the spot where geologist Schmitt discovered orange lunar soil. The Apollo 17 crew returned with 110 kilograms of rock and soil samples, more than was returned from any of the other lunar landing sites. Now forty three years later, Cernan and Schmitt are still the last to walk on the Moon.
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Ajoy Kar's profile photoRichard Shivell (AZgeek)'s profile photoJeff Skilling's profile photoKazimierz Kurz's profile photo
23 comments
 
Again with the no stars.
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The ISS and a Colorful Moon
Image Credit & Copyright: +Dylan O'Donnell 
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap150731.html

Tonight's Full Moon, the second Full Moon in July, could be called a blue moon according to modern folklore. But this sharp and detailed mosaic, recorded with telescope and digital camera just before July's first Full Moon, actually does show a colorful lunar surface. The colors have been enhanced in the processed image but are real nonetheless, corresponding to real differences in the chemical makeup of the lunar surface. Also easy to see especially when the Moon is near full phase, bright rays from 85 kilometer wide Tycho crater at the upper right extend far across the lunar surface. Against the southern lunar highlands above and right of Tycho is an amazingly detailed silhouette of the International Space Station. Seen from Byron Bay, NSW Australia on June 30, the ISS lunar transit lasted about 1/3 of a second, captured with a fast shutter speed in burst mode.
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Елена Березнякова's profile photoToday's Memory's profile photojaime pascual's profile photoBen Heaslewood's profile photo
28 comments
 
Flew over here today at 4:5am :) enjoy!!!
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The Deep Lagoon
Image Credit & Copyright: Adam Block, Mt. Lemmon SkyCenter, Univ. Arizona
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap150729.html

Ridges of glowing interstellar gas and dark dust clouds inhabit the turbulent, cosmic depths of the Lagoon Nebula. Also known as M8, The bright star forming region is about 5,000 light-years distant. But it still makes for a popular stop on telescopic tours of the constellation Sagittarius, toward the center of our Milky Way Galaxy. Dominated by the telltale red emission of ionized hydrogen atoms recombining with stripped electrons, this stunning, deep view of the Lagoon's central reaches is about 40 light-years across. Near the center of the frame, the bright hourglass shape is gas ionized and sculpted by energetic radiation and extreme stellar winds from a massive young star.
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Barbara Que's profile photoAstronomy & Astrophysics Magazine's profile photoJoshua LaMora's profile photoShivang Gupta's profile photo
22 comments
 
That's life that we should lo ve
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Milky Way and Aurora over Antarctica
Image Credit & Copyright: LI Hang
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap150727.html

It has been one of the better skies of this long night. In parts of Antarctica, not only is it winter, but the Sun can spend weeks below the horizon. At China's Zhongshan Station, people sometimes venture out into the cold to photograph a spectacular night sky. The featured image from one such outing was taken in mid-July, just before the end of this polar night. Pointing up, the wide angle lens captured not only the ground at the bottom, but at the top as well. In the foreground is a colleague also taking pictures. In the distance, a spherical satellite receiver and several windmills are visible. Numerous stars dot the night sky, including Sirius and Canopus. Far in the background, stretching overhead from horizon to horizon, is the central band of our Milky Way Galaxy. Even further in the distance, visible as extended smudges near the top, are the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, satellite galaxies near our huge Milky Way Galaxy.
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Cheyenne Huffman's profile photoAstronomy & Astrophysics Magazine's profile photoJoshua LaMora's profile photoJairo Velasquez's profile photo
67 comments
 
Watermelon Aurora and a big frothy Milky Way! Magnificent, really.
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Ultraviolet Rings of M31
Image Credit: GALEX, JPL-Caltech, +NASA
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap150724.html

A mere 2.5 million light-years away the Andromeda Galaxy, also known as M31, really is just next door as large galaxies go. So close and spanning some 260,000 light-years, it took 11 different image fields from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) satellite's telescope to produce this gorgeous portrait of the spiral galaxy in ultraviolet light. While its spiral arms stand out in visible light images of Andromeda, the arms look more like rings in the GALEX ultraviolet view, a view dominated by the energetic light from hot, young, massive stars. As sites of intense star formation, the rings have been interpreted as evidence Andromeda collided with its smaller neighboring elliptical galaxy M32 more than 200 million years ago. The large Andromeda galaxy and our own Milky Way are the most massive members of the local galaxy group.
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Daniel Watson's profile photoSameeer Sadaqat's profile photoJairo Velasquez's profile photoDarren Wood's profile photo
24 comments
 
Is very beautiful
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Gamma-ray Rain from 3C 279
Video Credit: +NASA, DOE, International Fermi LAT Collaboration
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap150722.html

If gamma-rays were raindrops a flare from a supermassive black hole might look like this. Not so gently falling on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope from June 14 to June 16 the gamma-ray photons, with energies up to 50 billion electron volts, originated in active galaxy 3C 279 some 5 billion light-years away. Each gamma-ray "drop" is an expanding circle in the timelapse visualization, the color and maximum size determined by the gamma-ray's measured energy. Starting with a background drizzle, the sudden downpour that then trails off is the intense, high energy flare. The creative and calming presentation of the historically bright flare covers a 5 degree wide region of the gamma-ray sky centered on 3C 279.
2015 July 22
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Tingiun Lin's profile photoMiguel Nievas's profile photoAlex Jefferson's profile photoQuasim Ruquiya Quasim's profile photo
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trippy
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Have them in circles
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Stripping ESO 137-001
+NASA, +European Space Agency, ESA, CXC
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap150801.html

Spiral galaxy ESO 137-001 hurtles through massive galaxy cluster Abell 3627 some 220 million light years away. The distant galaxy is seen in this colorful Hubble/Chandra composite image through a foreground of the Milky Way's stars toward the southern constellation Triangulum Australe. As the spiral speeds along at nearly 7 million kilometers per hour, its gas and dust are stripped away when ram pressure with the cluster's own hot, tenuous intracluster medium overcomes the galaxy's gravity. Evident in Hubble's near visible light data, bright star clusters have formed in the stripped material along the short, trailing blue streaks. Chandra's X-ray data shows off the enormous extent of the heated, stripped gas as diffuse, darker blue trails stretching over 400,000 light-years toward the bottom right. The significant loss of dust and gas will make new star formation difficult for this galaxy. A yellowish elliptical galaxy, lacking in star forming dust and gas, is just to the right of ESO 137-001 in the frame.
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Era Ela In Ruiz's profile photoisabel pinol's profile photoRichard “Qingye” Zeng's profile photoVoyager en 3D avec Google Earth's profile photo
22 comments
 
Very nice pic
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Milky Way over Uluru
Image Credit & Copyright: Babak Tafreshi (TWAN)
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap150730.html

The central regions of our Milky Way Galaxy rise above Uluru/Ayers Rock in this striking night skyscape. Recorded on July 13, a faint airglow along the horizon shows off central Australia's most recognizable landform in silhouette. Of course the Milky Way's own cosmic dust clouds appear in silhouette too, dark rifts along the galaxy's faint congeries of stars. Above the central bulge, rivers of cosmic dust converge on a bright yellowish supergiant star Antares. Left of Antares, wandering Saturn shines in the night.
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Astronomy & Astrophysics Magazine's profile photoJoshua LaMora's profile photoScott Nelson's profile phototroy britton's profile photo
33 comments
 
very beautiful.
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Rainbows and Rays over Bryce Canyon
Image Credit & Copyright: John Rummel
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap150728.html

What's happening over Bryce Canyon? Two different optical effects that were captured in one image taken earlier this month. Both effects needed to have the Sun situated directly behind the photographer. The nearest apparition was the common rainbow, created by sunlight streaming from the setting sun over the head of the photographer, and scattering from raindrops in front of the canyon. If you look closely, even a second rainbow appears above the first. More rare, and perhaps more striking, are the rays of light that emanate out from the horizon above the canyon. These are known as anticrepuscular rays and result from sunlight streaming though breaks in the clouds, around the sky, and converging at the point 180 degrees around from the Sun. Geometrically, this antisolar point must coincide with the exact center of the rainbows. Located in Utah, USA, Bryce Canyon itself contains a picturesque array of ancient sedimentary rock spires known as hoodoos.
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Carlo “EpA tUrUlo” RZ's profile photoMaricel Menal Cervelló's profile photoAstronomy & Astrophysics Magazine's profile photoBill Wheeler's profile photo
32 comments
 
Beautiful
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The Sombrero Galaxy from Hubble
Image Credit: Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI/+NASA)
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap150726.html

Why does the Sombrero Galaxy look like a hat? Reasons include the Sombrero's unusually large and extended central bulge of stars, and dark prominent dust lanes that appear in a disk that we see nearly edge-on. Billions of old stars cause the diffuse glow of the extended central bulge. Close inspection of the bulge in the above photograph shows many points of light that are actually globular clusters. M104's spectacular dust rings harbor many younger and brighter stars, and show intricate details astronomers don't yet fully understand. The very center of the Sombrero glows across the electromagnetic spectrum, and is thought to house a large black hole. Fifty million-year-old light from the Sombrero Galaxy can be seen with a small telescope towards the constellation of Virgo.
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Gary Loper's profile photoSamuel Cervantes's profile photoAstronomy & Astrophysics Magazine's profile photoJairo Velasquez's profile photo
17 comments
 
Wow. 
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Infrared Trifid
Image Credit: J. Rho (SSC/Caltech), JPL-Caltech, +NASA
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap150725.html

The Trifid Nebula, also known as Messier 20, is easy to find with a small telescope, a well known stop in the nebula rich constellation Sagittarius. But where visible light pictures show the nebula divided into three parts by dark, obscuring dust lanes, this penetrating infrared image reveals filaments of glowing dust clouds and newborn stars. The spectacular false-color view is courtesy of the Spitzer Space Telescope. Astronomers have used the Spitzer infrared image data to count newborn and embryonic stars which otherwise can lie hidden in the natal dust and gas clouds of this intriguing stellar nursery. As seen here, the Trifid is about 30 light-years across and lies only 5,500 light-years away.
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Paulo Apol oliveira's profile photocimi dervishi's profile photoQuasim Ruquiya Quasim's profile photoJarRosSlove BonDarenko's profile photo
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Very pretty and colorful love your picture :)
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Comet PanSTARRS, Moon, and Venus
Image Credit & Copyright: Amit Kamble (Auckland Astronomical Society); Rollover Annotation: Judy Schmidt
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap150723.html

It is the object to the left of the big tree that's generating much recent excitement. If you look closely, there you can see Comet PanSTARRS, complete with two tails. During July, this comet has increased markedly in brightness and has just passed its closest approach to Earth. The statuesque tree in the center is a Norfolk Island Pine, and to either side of this tree are New Zealand Pohutukaw trees. Over the trees, far in the distance, are bright Venus and an even brighter crescent Moon. If you look even more closely, you can find Jupiter hidden in the branches of the pine. The featured image was taken a few days ago in Fergusson Park, New Zealand, looking over Tauranga Harbour Inlet. In the coming days and weeks, Comet C/2014 Q1 (PANSTARRS) will slowly move away from the Sun and the Earth, drift deep into southern skies, and fade.
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mary fraissange's profile photoSezin loves Y'Shua's profile photoLady B's profile photoJaneth Martínez's profile photo
40 comments
 
That's so awesome 
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Discover the cosmos!
Introduction
Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.