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Join +Fraser Cain  and +Pamela Gay for a live episode of Astronomy Cast. We'll record our 30-minute show, and then stick around to answer your questions about space and astronomy. 

Astronomy Cast Ep. 370: Kaufmann–Bucherer–Neumann Experiments
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Astronomy Cast's profile photoDave B's profile photo
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Dave B
 
Would like to suggest a topic for discussion here that I first saw on Space.com:

'Golden Stars' Flicker in Patterns That Da Vinci Would Love
http://www.space.com/28652-variable-stars-golden-ratio-mystery.html
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Join +Fraser Cain  and +Pamela Gay for a live episode of Astronomy Cast. We'll record our 30-minute show, and then stick around to answer your questions about space and astronomy. 

Astronomy Cast Ep. 368: Searching for the Aether Wind: the Michelson–Morley Experiment

Waves move through a medium, like water or air. So it seemed logical to search for a medium that light waves move through. The Michelson-Morley Experiment attempted to search for this medium, known as the "luminiferous aether". The experiment gave a negative result, and helped set the stage for the theory of General Relativity.
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Astronomy Cast Ep. 368: Searching for the Aether Wind: the Michelson–Morley Experiment
Tue, February 17, 4:00 PM
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Guido Bibra's profile photoElaine Martins's profile photoAndrew Planet's profile photoMark Walker's profile photo
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Thanks +Hugo Burnham.

During the aftershow chat there was some question about the ownership of the Astronomy Cast +Patreon page.  Turns out that it was a legit page that was set up to test the waters. +Pamela L. Gay mentioned on twitter that they were unaware that the project was public.
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Join +Fraser Cain  and +Pamela Gay for a live episode of Astronomy Cast. We'll record our 30-minute show, and then stick around to answer your questions about space and astronomy. 

Astronomy Cast Ep. 366: HARPS Spectrograph

Almost all the planet hunting has been done from space. But there's a new instrument installed on the European Southern Observatory's 3.6 meter telescope called the High Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Searcher which has already turned up 130 planets.  Is this the future? Searching for planets from the ground?
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Astronomy Cast Ep. 366: HARPS Spectrograph
Mon, February 2, 3:00 PM
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Guido Bibra's profile photoPamela L. Gay's profile photoCosmoQuest's profile photoJames Boston's profile photo
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As always, a fascinating, entertaining presentation!
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Join +Fraser Cain  and +Pamela Gay for a live episode of Astronomy Cast. We'll record our 30-minute show, and then stick around to answer your questions about space and astronomy. 

Astronomy Cast Ep. 364: COROT Mission

Before NASA's Kepler mission searched for exoplanets using the transit method, there was the European COROT mission, launched in 2006. It was sent to search for planets with short orbital periods and find solar oscillations in stars. It was an incredibly productive mission, and the focus of today's show.
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Astronomy Cast Ep. 364: COROT Mission
Mon, January 12, 3:00 PM
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Pamela L. Gay's profile photoCosmoQuest's profile photoAndrew Planet's profile photoSheila Francl's profile photo
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As always, an informative and entertaining presentation! Til Monday Next...
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Join +Fraser Cain  and +Pamela Gay for a live episode of Astronomy Cast. We'll record our 30-minute show, and then stick around to answer your questions about space and astronomy. 

Ep. 362: Modern Women: Carolyn Porco

It hard to think of a more influential modern planetary scientist than Carolyn Porco, the leader of the imaging team for NASA's Cassini mission exploring Saturn. But before Cassini, Porco was involved in Voyager missions, and she'll be leading up the imaging team for New Horizons.
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Astronomy Cast Ep. 362: Modern Women: Carolyn Porco
Mon, December 29, 2014, 3:00 PM
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Guido Bibra's profile photoPamela L. Gay's profile photoCosmoQuest's profile photoMindi Meeks's profile photo
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:-( +Hugo Burnham 
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Join +Fraser Cain  and +Pamela Gay for a live episode of Astronomy Cast. We'll record our 30-minute show, and then stick around to answer your questions about space and astronomy. 

Ep. 360: Modern Women: Jocelyn Bell Burnell
Jocelyn Bell Burnell is an Irish astronomer, best known for being part of the team that discovered pulsars, and the following controversy when she was excluded from the Nobel Prize winning team.
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Astronomy Cast Ep. 360: Modern Women: Jocelyn Bell Burnell
Mon, December 8, 2014, 3:00 PM
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Guido Bibra's profile photoPamela L. Gay's profile photoCosmoQuest's profile photoJean-jacques Pernet's profile photo
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This belongs in a forum. (Yahoo Group nostalgia)

The presentation featured the Irish astronomer Jocelyn Bell Burnell, the discoverer and co-discoverer of a famous 'bit of scruff'. Burnell's work ethic and her supportive nature were praised. It was also said that she did not suffer fools gladly (or words to that content). The context was gender bias.

Somewhat different take, enabling technologies. (Truism, a discovery cannot be made before its time has come.) In the present case, was any particular software used to detect that particular 'bit of scruff'. Some mainframes must have been online in 1967.  Looked that up, reams of print outs are mentioned (pen and paper zigzag?). Rough translation: semi-automated. Construction of the Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory near Cambridge was still in progress while the Hewish team, mainly Burnell, started their celestial survey there. Technically, first dips.

Somewhat enhanced: And the big hit of the Sears Xmas catalog of the year 1610 was a spy-glass by Hans Lippershey. Some better known night sky discoveries followed in short order. Brilliant report cards for some. Then the new gadget had exhausted itself (at least for a time, dotted progress line, scale the thing up).

Pulsars, even as other forms of degenerative matter, had been predicted for decades. Their actual discovery - the Hewish team discovered several of them - did not usher in the atomic age (life cycles everywhere).

Tombaugh of the blink comparator never received a Nobel prize.
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Will be rescheduled when Fraser get back from traveling!
Sorry for the delay!

Join +Fraser Cain  and +Pamela Gay for a live episode of Astronomy Cast. We'll record our 30-minute show, and then stick around to answer your questions about space and astronomy. 

Astronomy Cast Ep. 369: The Fizeau Experiment

Light is tricky stuff, and it took scientists hundreds of years to puzzle out what this stuff is. But they poked and prodded at it with many clever experiments to try to measure its speed, motion and interaction with the rest of the Universe. For example, the Fizeau Experiment, which ran light through moving water to see if that caused a difference.
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TBA! Astronomy Cast Ep. 369: The Fizeau Experiment
Mon, March 9, 3:00 PM
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Paul Dean's profile photoAdrian Morgan's profile photoLaintal Sibornal's profile photoNancy Graziano's profile photo
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OK, here's a general question that I only remember when something reminds me. It's about Mars.

Back in 2009, a NASA team speculated that a certain mineral, extremely rare on Earth, might be largely responsible for the red colour of Mars. References: http://phys.org/news179652861.html (2009 press release) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macaulayite (Wikipedia article).

Now, obviously Ockham's Razor has always been against the idea. If the colour of Mars is adequately explained by bog-standard rust (as any reference work will say), you need a really good reason to posit some exotic mineral. But that doesn't mean it's not true.

The thing is, we know a lot more about Martian rocks now than we did in 2009, thanks to a certain rover that's famous for its detailed chemical analyses of Martian rocks. So I don't see how this could still be an open question, and yet the Wikipedia article still says "NASA scientists speculate". What gives?

Surely, by now, we have either (a) a definitive answer to whether or not macaulayite is abundant on Mars, or (b) a debunking of the original hypothesis explaining why it was a doomed idea from the start. Either way, something that could be referenced to bring the Wikipedia article up to date. You got anything?

(The reason this interests me is that the idea of a mineral being extremely rare on one planet yet abundant on another is a very cool thing, and this would be a fascinating example if true.)
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Join +Fraser Cain  and +Pamela Gay for a live episode of Astronomy Cast. We'll record our 30-minute show, and then stick around to answer your questions about space and astronomy. 

Astronomy Cast Ep. 367: Spitzer does Exoplanets

We've spent the last few weeks talking about different ways astronomers are searching for exoplanets. But now we reach the most exciting part of this story: actually imaging these planets directly. Today we're going to talk about the work NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has done viewing the atmospheres of distant planets.
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Astronomy Cast Ep. 367: Spitzer does Exoplanets- Rescheduled!
Tue, February 10, 3:00 PM
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CosmoQuest's profile photoPamela L. Gay's profile photoAndrew Planet's profile photoPatrick Festa's profile photo
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Yeah, can't donate directly to LS thru CosmoQuest's PayPal, but donations will help there, too! The info for patreon for LS can be found here: http://cosmoquest.org/x/educatorszone/learning-space/learning-space-patreon-details/ 


+Andrew Planet +Nancy Graziano 
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Join +Fraser Cain  and +Pamela Gay for a live episode of Astronomy Cast. We'll record our 30-minute show, and then stick around to answer your questions about space and astronomy. 

Astronomy Cast Ep. 365: Gaia
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Astronomy Cast Ep. 365: Gaia
Mon, January 26, 3:00 PM
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CosmoQuest's profile photoTiberiu Igrisan's profile photoAndrew Planet's profile photoDominicG Doyle's profile photo
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Dave B
 
Wish I could ever catch one of these live. Ah well.

Anyways, someone, somewhere, is going to use this data to create a star-faring MMORPG with a scientifically accurate map of our galactic neighborhood.

Beware, Romulans (e.g.): we are only a successful Kick-starter campaign… plus one GAIA mission’s worth of results, of course… away from actively training for your demise at the hands of the Federation (e.g.)!
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Join +Fraser Cain  and +Pamela Gay for a live episode of Astronomy Cast. We'll record our 30-minute show, and then stick around to answer your questions about space and astronomy. 

Astronomy Cast Ep. 363: Where Did The Earth's Water Come From?

Where on Earth did our water come from. Well, obviously not from Earth, of course, but from space. But did it come from comets, or did the water form naturally right here in the Solar System, and the Earth just scooped it up?
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Astronomy Cast Ep. 363: Where Did The Earth's Water Come From?
Mon, January 5, 3:00 PM
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mekotaandi's profile photoDurgesh Pandey's profile photoBrian Marshall's profile photoChaya ben-dor's profile photo
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Happy new year all, keep going the good work.
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Join +Fraser Cain  and +Pamela Gay for a live episode of Astronomy Cast. We'll record our 30-minute show, and then stick around to answer your questions about space and astronomy. 

Ep. 361: Modern Women: Maria Zuber

Maria Zuber is one of the hardest working scientists in planetary science, being a part of six different space missions to explore the Solar System. Currently, she's the lead investigator for NASA's GRAIL mission, 
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Astronomy Cast Ep. 361: Modern Women: Maria Zuber
Mon, December 22, 2014, 3:00 PM
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Guido Bibra's profile photoPamela L. Gay's profile photoCosmoQuest's profile photoAndrew Planet's profile photo
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FAR-FIG-NEWTON 
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Hi All,

This is +Pamela L. Gay. It's #Giving Tuesday, and I know you're hearing a lot of different people begging for money, and I'm going to be one more I guess.

Will you please give? 
CosmoQuest: http://bit.ly/CQXgive
365 Days of Astronomy: http://bit.ly/365DoA

Both CosmoQuest and 365 Days of Astronomy have very real financial needs at the moment. By "need", I mean that some people are starting to forgo salary to keep the programs going in the face of too many Federal cuts. Every little bit helps. 
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Love science love the universe
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