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XINYETONG TRADE(HK)CO.,LIMITED
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What are the RFID tags with BLACK DOTS?
Most manufacturers have a stringent quality assurance process that checks each tag’s EPC memory. When a roll is found with a defective RFID tag, a black dot or marking is placed on the tag to let the end user know that they should not use that tag. Subsequently, an additional good RFID tag is added onto the end of the roll to ensure that you receive the full purchased quantity of tags.

When we print/encode RFID tags, our printer should automatically identify the defective RFID tags and print “VOID” on that tag. Furthermore, the sequence should continue unbroken. However, sometimes our printer’s quality assurance standards are not as fine-tuned as the manufacturer’s. This means that we sometimes print and encode these black mark tags. We recommend that you DO NOT use the black mark tags even if they are not marked VOID. Again, this means that the sequence may have some “skips” because a bad tag was used as a part of the sequence. Let us know if this “skip” will have a negative effect on your RFID deployment.

Will all of the RFID Tags that I purchase be encoded?
If it is vital to your application that your tags be delivered in a complete and perfect EPC memory sequence, please let our sales team know. Frequently, calibration issues create “skips” in the tag sequence that result in the sequence stretching over the number of tags that customers purchase. For example, instead of a sequence from 1-5000, a sequence might run from 1-5005 because 5 tags were “skipped” in the printing process due to voided tags.

We can ensure that a roll is perfectly sequential, but we need to know that this is important to your application before we begin the printing process. Most applications only require that tags have unique identifiers, so this does not cause end user issues.

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What can RFID be used for?
RFID tags come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes; they may be encased in a variety of materials:
Animal tracking tags, inserted beneath the skin, can be rice-sized.
Tags can be screw-shaped to identify trees or wooden items.
Credit-card shaped for use in access applications.
The anti-theft hard plastic tags attached to merchandise in stores are also RFID tags.
Heavy-duty 120 by 100 by 50 millimeter rectangular transponders are used to track shipping containers, or heavy machinery, trucks, and railroad cars.
RFID devices have been used for years to identify dogs, for a means of permanent identification. Dog owners had long used tattoos, permanent ink markings, typically on the ears. However, these can fade with age and it may be difficult to get the animal to sit still while you examine him for markings.
Many musical instruments are stolen every year. For example, custom-built or vintage guitars are worth as much as $50,000 each. Snagg, a California company specializing in RFID microchips for instruments, has embedded tiny chips in 30,000 Fender guitars already. The database of RFID chip IDs is made available to law enforcement officials, dealers, repair shops and luthiers.
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Is RFID Technology Secure and Private?
Unfortunately, not very often in the systems to which consumers are likely to be exposed. Anyone with an appropriately equipped scanner and close access to the RFID device can activate it and read its contents. Obviously, some concerns are greater than others. If someone walks by your bag of books from the bookstore with a 13.56 Mhz "sniffer" with an RF field that will activate the RFID devices in the books you bought, that person can get a complete list of what you just bought. That's certainly an invasion of your privacy, but it could be worse. Another scenario involves a military situation in which the other side scans vehicles going by, looking for tags that are associated with items that only high-ranking officers can have, and targeting accordingly.
Companies are more concerned with the increasing use of RFID devices in company badges. An appropriate RF field will cause the RFID chip in the badge to "spill the beans" to whomever activates it. This information can then be stored and replayed to company scanners, allowing the thief access - and your badge is the one that is "credited" with the access.
The smallest tags that will likely be used for consumer items don't have enough computing power to do data encryption to protect your privacy. The most they can do is PIN-style or password-based protection.

Post has attachment
Is RFID Technology Secure and Private?
Unfortunately, not very often in the systems to which consumers are likely to be exposed. Anyone with an appropriately equipped scanner and close access to the RFID device can activate it and read its contents. Obviously, some concerns are greater than others. If someone walks by your bag of books from the bookstore with a 13.56 Mhz "sniffer" with an RF field that will activate the RFID devices in the books you bought, that person can get a complete list of what you just bought. That's certainly an invasion of your privacy, but it could be worse. Another scenario involves a military situation in which the other side scans vehicles going by, looking for tags that are associated with items that only high-ranking officers can have, and targeting accordingly.
Companies are more concerned with the increasing use of RFID devices in company badges. An appropriate RF field will cause the RFID chip in the badge to "spill the beans" to whomever activates it. This information can then be stored and replayed to company scanners, allowing the thief access - and your badge is the one that is "credited" with the access.
The smallest tags that will likely be used for consumer items don't have enough computing power to do data encryption to protect your privacy. The most they can do is PIN-style or password-based protection.
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Next-Generation Uses of RFID?
Some vendors have been combining RFID tags with sensors of different kinds. This would allow the tag to report not simply the same information over and over, but identifying information along with current data picked up by the sensor. For example, an RFID tag attached to a leg of lamb could report on the temperature readings of the past 24 hours, to ensure that the meat was properly kept cool.
Over time, the proportion of "scan-it-yourself" aisles in retail stores will increase. Eventually, we may wind up with stores that have mostly "scan-it-yourself" aisles and only a few checkout stations for people who are disabled or unwilling.

How to If Your Clothes Have RFID Tags In Them
Step 1:
Look inside your clothes. Once you are home from a clothing retailer, such as Old Navy, look on the inside of the T-shirt, shorts, pants or jeans to see if that piece of clothing has an RFID tag sewn into the lining. The RFID tag looks like the image here.
Old Navy baby pants
Step 2:
Remove RFID tags. For those that don't want the tags in their home for a variety of reasons, it's easy to remove them. It would be best to remove the RFID tag before washing the clothes and this is also suggested to the purchaser on the tag.
RFID tag being cut out of clothing
Step 3:
Use scissors. To remove the RFID tag, all you need to do is cut it out with scissors. Take care to cut them out up to where it was sewn in, not to the dotted line. In this photo of an Old Navy skort, you can see the RFID.
Old Navy Skort for baby girls
Step 4:
Here are some companies who right now are using RFID tags in their shipments: Wal-Mart, Old Navy, Lockheed Martin, Proctor & Gamble and CVS.

Why should I buy Universal Tags and what info should I know?
Universal Tags are tags that are compatible with ALL NFC enabled smartphones! 
Universal Tags are compatible with ALL NFC devices including the Nexus 4, Galaxy S4 & S5, & Nexus 10, LG G3, Motorola Moto X and Droid Turbo, HTC One, Sony, Samsung Note 3 and 4, and ALL other NFC phones.
Anti-Metal Tags have a special backing allowing them to work even on metal surfaces.
Tags are lockable by some 3rd Party Apps, but once locked can NEVER be re-written.
NTAG203 Tags have about 137 bytes of usable memory.
Topaz 512 Tags have about 450 bytes of usable memory.
NTAG213 Tags are a newer version of NTAG203. Both tags work great, but NTAG213 might have a slight edge on response.
NTAG216 Tags are a newer high capacity tag that has about 850 bytes of usable memory.
For more info on the Galaxy S4, Nexus 4, and general NFC Compatibility see our NFC Tags Compatibility Issues page.

What data will be encoded to my RFID Tags?
By default, the asiarfid operations team will encode 24 digits of hexadecimal characters to the RFID tag’s EPC memory. Specifically, the sequence will begin like this:
000000000000000000000001
That number will be augmented sequentially up to the number of tags that you purchased. So, if you purchased 5000 tags, your sequence will begin and end like this:
000000000000000000000001 - 000000000000000000005000
This will result in each tag having a unique identifier that you can use in your RFID application.
If you have other specifications for the tag’s EPC memory that you would like to have encoded, we will be contacting you after you purchase your tags. Our sales team will ask you for a spreadsheet of the data that you would like to have encoded. If you do not specify a different set of EPC data, we will use the sequence mentioned above.

Why Custom Encoding?
RFID tags generally come from the manufacturer without unique IDs written onto the integrated circuit. Although some tags do come with sequential unique IDs, they are frequently not in the end user's desired format. Because RFID tags are usually used to identify specific assets/people/entities, most RFID tags need to be encoded with data before they can be used. This is where atlasRFIDstore comes in.
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