Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Artisan Dental, LLC
17 followers
17 followers
About
Artisan Dental, LLC's posts

Post has attachment
How we prepare for your visit at Artisan Dental

We take safety very seriously at Artisan Dental. In preparing for your dental visit with us, we follow the CDC’s guidelines for infection control. First, all contaminated items are removed from the operatory and taken to sterilization. This area is divided into contaminated and sterilized sections to eliminate any cross contamination. Next, we wipe down all surfaces in the operatory with a medical grade disinfectant. Anything that gets touched gets wiped down. Some obvious examples include counters, cabinets and instruments, but other less obvious examples include cabinet handles, keyboard, mouse, xray activation button and pens. The room is then reset for your visit with sterilized instruments and disposable barriers and the computer is set to HIPAA compliant settings to protect your privacy. Universal precautions such as frequent hand washing, monitoring water quality and keeping accurate sterilization records assure that we have your health in mind. We use distilled water for our irrigation lines, disposable barriers on xray sensors, disposable suction tips and have keyboard covers on all keyboards. At the end of each day all suction lines are disinfected. In addition, each week we send test strips to the lab to assure that our sterilization equipment is working properly. We have a written infection-control program that all clinical staff follow and are trained in on a yearly basis. All of our disinfection and sterilization processes are followed after each operatory has been used, giving you a clean and safe environment for your appointment.For more information on the sterilization practices that we use feel free to learn more at:https://www.cdc.gov/oralhealth/infectioncontrol/faq/sterilization_cleaning.htm

Post has attachment
10 Things You Didn’t Know About Your Toothbrush.
We know and love our toothbrushes as the tools that kick plaque to the curb, help keep cavities at bay (with the help of fluoride toothpaste, of course) and freshen our breath. But what else can we learn about them? Read on for some toothbrush facts.http://ow.ly/4WIn30bOPfC

Post has attachment
Runner’s World Shares Tips To Help Runners Protect Their Teeth.
Runner’s World (5/15, Kuzma) lists several ways runners may be harming their teeth, offering suggestions to help promote dental health. For example, the article states that runners may be “overdoing it on sugar in the name of fueling.” To help address this, the article recommends runners rinse their mouths out with water after consuming items such as gels and sports drinks, select “flavors without citric or tartaric acid,” and consume “a healthy diet and plenty of non-sugary beverages” during the rest of the day. http://ow.ly/nQOE30bOqmQ

Post has attachment

6 Habits That Harm Your Teeth (And How to Break Them)
http://artisandentalmadison.com/6-habits-that-harm-your-te…/

Nibbling a nail while reading or crunching an ice cube while drinking a glass of water… Some may consider these mindless habits, but they could be damaging their teeth without even realizing it. Check out this list of harmful habits and how to help break them today.

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/bad-habits?source=morninghuddle
Photo

Post has attachment
Smile: It's good for you!
Photo

Post has attachment
7 Risk Factors for Oral Cancer
http://artisandentalmadison.com/7-risk-factors-for-oral-cancer/

Approximately 49,750 people will be diagnosed with oral cavity and oropharynx cancers this year. Regular dental visits can help detect such cancers early, and changing a few potentially harmful habits may also help reduce a person’s chances of developing them. At Artisan Dental your preventive care examinations include an Oral Cancer Screening.

Gender: Men are twice more likely to get oral cancer. The American Cancer Society attributes this to higher rates of alcohol and tobacco use by men, but says more men of a younger age are being diagnosed with HPV-related forms of oral cancer.

Age: Most people who are diagnosed with oral cancer are 55 or older, according to the American Cancer Society. HPV-related oral cancers, however, are often diagnosed in people who are younger.

Tobacco: Whether you smoke it or chew it, tobacco use increases your risk dramatically. Smoking can cause oral cancer, as well as cancer in other parts of the body. Pipe smokers are also at a higher risk for developing cancer in their lips. Smokeless tobacco, like chew, can lead to many issues in your mouth, the most serious being cancer of the cheeks, gums, and lips.

Alcohol: According to the American Cancer Society, 7 of 10 oral cancer patients are heavy drinkers. Heavy drinking, as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is an average of two drinks a day or more for men and an average of more than one drink a day for women. If you are a heavy drinker and a heavy smoker, your chances of developing oral cancer increase significantly.

Human Papilloma Virus (HPV): The sexually transmitted disease is now associated with about 9,000 cases of head and neck cancer (specifically those occurring at the back of the tongue, in or around the tonsils) diagnosed each year in the United States, according to the CDC. People who are diagnosed with HPV-related head and neck cancer tend to be younger and nonsmokers. People with HPV-positive cancers have a lower risk of death or recurrence, even though these cancers are often diagnosed at a later stage because it develops in difficult-to-detect areas.

Sunlight: People who have jobs working outside are more prone to developing lip cancer and should use UV protection.

Diet: Poor nutrition also may put you at risk for developing oral cancer. A diet low in fruits and vegetables may increase your chance of developing oral cancer, so add more color to your plate!

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/oral-cancer-slideshow?source=morninghuddle
Photo

Post has attachment

Post has attachment
Headaches And Fractured Teeth May Indicate Bruxism (teeth grinding)

USA Today (4/7, Bowerman) reported that according to ADA spokesperson Dr. Maria Lopez Howell, waking up with headaches, a sore jaw, sensitive teeth, or finding fractures in teeth could be signs of bruxism, which may be attributed to stress, anxiety, and sleeping disorders. A recent study in The Journal of the American Dental Association also suggests that teeth grinding is associated with alcohol, caffeine, and tobacco use. Dr. Howell advises seeing a dentist to discuss possible solutions, which may include using a mouthguard at night to protect teeth. “Bruxism is a condition that needs to be treated by a dentist with a night guard or splint,” she said. “This actually involves the joint; we are protecting the joint and the teeth, and it needs to be done with experience and knowledge of that whole chewing complex.”

http://artisandentalmadison.com/headaches-and-fractured-teeth-may-indicate-bruxism-teeth-grinding/


Photo

Post has attachment
Spring Cleaning? Don't forget to replace your toothbrush. The ADA recommends replacing every 3-4 mos. Bring in your used one and we'll partner with +TerraCycle to recycle it!
Photo
Photo
4/12/17
2 Photos - View album

Post has attachment
During April-Oral Cancer Awareness month, we'll donate $1 for every oral cancer screening done @ Artisan Dental to UW Cancer Research Foundation.
Photo
Wait while more posts are being loaded