Profile

Cover photo
Verified name
1,162,301 followers|41,811,126 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideos
People
Have them in circles
1,162,301 people
EMES STOR's profile photo
vanessa hatcher's profile photo
Jose Arrazola's profile photo
christian lopez escobar's profile photo
sandip gorkhali's profile photo
Alex Johnson's profile photo
Chayan Chatterjee's profile photo
Judith J. Bhakta D. Hise's profile photo
shérif gonzalez's profile photo
Story
Tagline
Serving the technologist for over 1.3141592 x 10⁻¹ centuries
Introduction

Original news and reviews, analysis of tech trends, and expert advice on the most fundamental aspects of tech and the many ways it's helping us enjoy our world.

Page managed by Staff Editor Nathan Mattise

Stream

Ars Technica

Shared publicly  - 
 
<3 100 percent mission success <3
Because it is reliant on Russian engines the Atlas V may only fly for a few more years.
15
1
John Kirsopp's profile photo
 
... and no one cared. They're not trying anything new and they've been launching since the sixties. SpaceX makes their own engines here, in the US. They launch for ~ $60 million compared to over $200 million, minimum. Their recovered boosters will fly again, changing the launch services industry again. ULA is a dinosaur, SpaceX is the meteor that up-ended their dominance.
Add a comment...

Ars Technica

Shared publicly  - 
 
Many companies practice bad customer service, only a few are so bad they testify about it in DC hearings
Two biggest cable companies pledge improvements at Senate hearing.
7
2
Edward Holland's profile photoE. Gerry Murray's profile photoAnon Dowson's profile photoSteve S's profile photo
10 comments
Steve S
+
2
3
2
 
+E. Gerry Murray Monopolies are inherently bad, and if we allow them at all, we need to heavily regulate them to keep them in line. This has to include requirements for customer satisfaction.
Add a comment...

Ars Technica

Shared publicly  - 
 
Today's leading candidate for "nerdiest thing on Ars"
Apple's high-level networking APIs can do a lot of the heavy lifting for you.
5
1
Add a comment...

Ars Technica

Shared publicly  - 
 
Bye bye, Oculus DRM
News breaks not from official announcement, but from discovery by workaround dev.
18
2
Anthony Barber's profile photoDave Combe's profile photoZack Casey's profile photo
3 comments
 
Proving once again that DRM doesn't work.
Add a comment...

Ars Technica

Shared publicly  - 
 
Study respondents (essentially): Cars should totally save more people, yeah. Wait, what if I'm in the car? Uh...
The new NIMBY: Should self-driving cars sacrifice a few if it will save more?
6
Kevin Algiers's profile photoWolfgang Rupprecht's profile photo
2 comments
 
So all you need to cause a self driving car to drive off a cliff is a carboard cutout of a bunch of school children blocking the road?
Add a comment...

Ars Technica

Shared publicly  - 
 
But if the founding fathers had Skype, no problemo.
Court says defendant has "constitutional right" to confront witnesses at trial.
8
Theo Gough's profile photo
 
beyond ridiculous.
Add a comment...
Have them in circles
1,162,301 people
EMES STOR's profile photo
vanessa hatcher's profile photo
Jose Arrazola's profile photo
christian lopez escobar's profile photo
sandip gorkhali's profile photo
Alex Johnson's profile photo
Chayan Chatterjee's profile photo
Judith J. Bhakta D. Hise's profile photo
shérif gonzalez's profile photo

Ars Technica

Shared publicly  - 
 
Gone to the big hardware recycling mechanism (aka parents' house) in the sky
Apple tells users to look elsewhere instead of replacing the 5-year-old screen.
6
Add a comment...

Ars Technica

Shared publicly  - 
 
Take it from reader @GorillaFAQ (re: security), "Android is basically Windows circa 1998 - 2004."
Malware family packages a large number of exploits that give all-powerful root access.
11
1
Benson Leung's profile photoBurak Bağdatlı's profile photoMichael Webber's profile photo
11 comments
 
+Benson Leung I, for one, worry that bringing Android apps to ChromeOS will diminish Chromebook security. Maybe you can adequately sand box Android on a Chromebook, but the app itself might be the vulnerability. I prefer my Chromebook over any other device for banking etc. Unfortunately using a browser seems to trigger security flags more than using an app with KitKat. If I'm overseas I don't get log in grief with an app on any phone. But using a browser usually triggers a call us request.
Add a comment...

Ars Technica

Shared publicly  - 
 
Only one Megauploader has gone to US prison for copyright infringement. "Kim keeps babbling on about how he helps everybody and is such a great freedom fighter, but the reality is something else. Kim’s always been interested in the well-being of just one person, and that’s Kim himself."
Programmer Andrew Nõmm: "I had to be made an example of as a warning to all IT people."
6
1
Dave DeBaeremaeker's profile photoJon Belanger's profile photoRonald Stepp's profile photoTanner Blomster's profile photo
5 comments
 
Feel bad for the guy. 
Add a comment...

Ars Technica

Shared publicly  - 
 
Man's best (robo)friend
Boston Dynamics' future with Alphabet could be up in the air, but they keep making bots.
22
4
Add a comment...

Ars Technica

Shared publicly  - 
 
There's a certain age of reader that doesn't get this analogy, right? "If the headphone jack is the new floppy drive, what's the new CD-RW?"
If the headphone jack is the new floppy drive, what's the new CD-RW?
37
2
Tracey Allen's profile photoMike DeSimone's profile photoAlex Clark's profile photo
29 comments
 
+Tracey Allen​ How would audio over Lightning have better quality? Audio quality would be entirely dependant on the DAC. With a headphone jack that is in the phone so it would be a known entity to the user. With a digital connection like Lighting or Bluetooth the DAC would be located either in the receiving device or an adapter, and audio throughput quality would be different on every device you connected to. I also doubt that the DAC used in an adapter would be as high quality as that located in a high end device like a flagship smartphone or laptop.

You also stated that there's nothing that a headphone jack can do that Bluetooth can't do better. Lighting would be workable but less convenient for sure, but I would never use Bluetooth for professional audio.

And still, if we're just at rough feature parity between the options why make the change? That's really the whole point of the article - there's no option that is clearly better than the 3.5mm TRS headphone jack and almost nothing wrong with it. Removing it from devices is just silly. 
Add a comment...

Ars Technica

Shared publicly  - 
 
Can't figure out some kind of whitelist arrangement, federal IT?
Security measures were disabled because Clinton's e-mails were "going to spam."
19
4
Edward Holland's profile photoMike DeSimone's profile photo
15 comments
 
+Edward Holland "discounts"...
Add a comment...