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It's time to reignite your dungeon master passion.
Streamlining, self-publishing, annual stories—if you left, it's time to unretire for 5E.
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Dimitris Keramidas's profile photoRanko Čoklica's profile photoIrufort Grantz™'s profile photoJusttyn Hutcheson's profile photo
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It's good to hear Pathfinder has competition again. The OGL finally put 5th ed online.
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Seriously, just put your quadcopters away this weekend, Bay Area.
Oh, and there's a new app to tell you about temporary flight restriction zones.
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Michael Baldwin's profile photoJarrod Frates's profile photoIrufort Grantz™'s profile photo
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That's not what TFRs are for and they never have been. They're to provide for public safety. TFRs prevent random pilots from trying to get a view of what's going on and not paying attention to the skies. They go up over every single major outdoor sporting event, including every MBL, NFL, and NASCAR event, starting three hours before and extending until the event ends. One plane with a distracted pilot over an event can be a problem; two or more is inviting a collision. The same problem, at a lesser damage scale, would be present with unfettered drone access. Even a 2kg drone falling from hundreds of feet up could cause serious injuries.
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You mean you aren't thinking straight after receiving 50,000 volts? O_o
17,000 US police departments stunned more than 2 million people in the past decade.
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Irufort Grantz™'s profile photoIvan Pierre's profile photoKerstin Weinreben's profile photoJonathan Seyghal's profile photo
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+Jake Carter I'm sure the Chinese and Russian police hold exactly the same philosophy.

(I'm not at all defending violently resisting arrest. I am suggesting that tasers -- and more deadly force -- are too quickly used in things falling short of "crazy crack head trying kill everyone" sorts of scenarios, and that a known tendency of tazed subjects to waive rights creates a conflict of interest for the police that needs to be kept in mind.)
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We all love zombies, but stream Shaun of the Dead instead.
The undead are not a lively addition to the Jane Austen classic.
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Randy Wright's profile photoorlando cordero (ahimsa)'s profile photoRuby Barnett's profile photoIrufort Grantz™'s profile photo
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"We all love zombies" says who? I wish critics would stop using "we." When you do that you're assuming that everyone agrees with you. No, we don't all love zombies! 
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Rejected headline: "Evidence continues to mount that this kid is a real jerk."
Hearing exposes Turing’s lavish spending, while exec says they’re losing money.
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juan diaz's profile photoEmmanuel Taban's profile photoQuantum Pop's profile photoChris N's profile photo
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+Michael Carman I don't think it's nearly that simple.  There's a great deal of competition in the medical industry for non-emergency care.  (Emergency care has less but growing competition in the form of urgent care and emergency care centers not connected to hospitals.)

There are often multiple generic forms of drugs that are off patent.  Even those on patent are usually not the sole (and sometimes not even the best) treatment option.  One can, to a degree, usually choose their doctor.  It depends on what insurance they accept and if they have room for new patients, but there are still usually options.  This sometimes limits options for hospitals or other medical services to use, so it's not completely open like buying a loaf of bread, but demand isn't strictly inelastic and the buyer does have some possible choices.

Single-payer has the benefit of negotiating power, but that's still based on competition among pharmaceutical companies (presuming you don't get into price setting, which is problematic).  The main thing keeping the insurance industry from negotiating lower prices en masse is anti-trust restrictions.  There's been talk of lifting that by people on both sides of the aisle, but it doesn't seem to have reached critical mass just yet.
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NASA is from Mars, space experts are from Venus?
Testimony says NASA lacks the financial resources and technology to do the mission.
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mike griffin's profile photoJeremy Mone (JarethGK)'s profile photoMarkos Vernal's profile photoJonathan Moore's profile photo
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Sure... let's let some other country do it.  Nothing could possibly go wrong if someone else does it first... o.0;
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Ars Technica

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General journalism rule of thumb: never put a boy's genitals on TV.
Family asked KOAA to report on issue, story ended up showing the boy's name and his penis.
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Elliott S's profile photoZanaris Falador's profile photoJarkko Yli-Heikkuri's profile photoIrufort Grantz™'s profile photo
 
Lol he has em by the short n curlies
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"We doubt many people would want their vacuum cleaner to be related to a killbot..."
iRobot will focus on its Roomba empire, leaving bomb disposal to a separate company.
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shantoyia glenn's profile photoTim Davies's profile photoIrufort Grantz™'s profile photoEmmanuel Taban's profile photo
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Super !
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"McDonald’s has unveiled a new salad with a “nutrient-rich lettuce blend with baby kale,” shaved parmesan, and chicken (grilled or fried). Like many fast-food salads, it may seem like a healthy option at first, but it’s not. The salad, when paired with the restaurant’s Asiago Caesar Dressing, packs more fat, calories, and salt than a double Big Mac—that’s a sandwich with four beef patties."
Fast-food salads or not, eating out is bad for your health according to new studies.
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Hontas Farmer's profile photoHenry Stern's profile photoDavide Pesavento's profile photoMorgan Collins's profile photo
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Who the fuck even goes to those places?
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Well, let's hope everyone's water bottles are fine.
More data shows that BPS and other BPA replacements also disrupt hormones.
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Benjamin Cronce's profile photoMark Kuite's profile photoIrufort Grantz™'s profile photoLuca Manunta's profile photo
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+TOM P ​true, but risk goes way up in an artificial world.
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"Every piece of 3D software we use today will move to VR as quickly as possible."
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Well, here we go again. "Its employees altered historical climate data to get politically correct results in an attempt to disprove the eighteen year lack of global temperature increases."
Focus on why we shouldn’t do anything about it, but science takes beating, too.
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Paweł Kuźniar's profile photoTOM P's profile photoLars Clausen's profile photo
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There's plenty of plain scientists plainly showing that climate change is quite real and quite man-made. Politicians are going "lalalalawecanthearyou".
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Serving the technologist for over 1.3141592 x 10⁻¹ centuries
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Original news and reviews, analysis of tech trends, and expert advice on the most fundamental aspects of tech and the many ways it's helping us enjoy our world.

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