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Here's pretty much what always happens: I open the fridge, I see the peanut butter, and I think to myself "self, you know what would be delicious? Peanut butter cookies."

So I take the peanut butter out of the fridge, and hit the bake button on my oven, which automatically sets it to preheat to 350F. I grab a medium-sized mixing bowl out of one cupboard, and snag the rice-cooker cup (which is precisely 2/3 a real measuring cup) and the granulated sugar out of the dry goods cupboard. I fill the 2/3-cup-sized cup to the brim with sugar and dump it in the bowl, and then remember to check and see if I have eggs.

If I don't have eggs, I am very sad, and pour the sugar back.

If I do have eggs, I crack one into the bowl, and then toss in a half a tsp of baking powder or soda (powder is best, but needs must) and whip it all together into a cream. This is usually super easy, because I spring for baker's sugar at the store.

(Fun fact: you can actually make these cookies with splenda, too, and I don't even mean the mixed-with-real-sugar-kind. You just have to take them out of the oven 1-2 minutes sooner.)

Then I fill that same 2/3-cup-sized cup to the brim, again, this time with peanut butter, and dump that in with the already mixed egg, sugar, and baking powder. If I've got chocolate chips, I pour a whole bunch (that is totally the technical term) into the bowl, too. It takes about 20-30 stirs to make the whole thing into a fluffy dough that I can spoon out into 12 balls that I plop onto a baking sheet, and by this time, the oven has just dinged that it's preheated.

Bake 'em for 12 minutes (10 if I'm making the sugar free kind), let cool for, um, as long as I can stand so that I don't burn my tongue (my mileage varies on this step), and tada.

Now, who's checking to see if they've got peanut butter?

See? That ALWAYS happens.
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Steven Barrett's profile photoJ Gingold's profile photoAriana Osborne's profile photo
10 comments
 
Hm. I have been meaning to try these with Splenda...
 
The things about using splenda for baking instead of sugar is that it doesn't caramelize the same way, and it doesn't keep things moist the same way. The caramelization isn't an issue with this recipe, but the moisture is -- the cookies will essentially turn out like scones if you don't take them out early. If your oven bakes hot, you may even want to go with 8 minutes. Even if they're a little underdone, the egg will continue to cook as the cookies are cooling, so there's no risk there.

SCIENCE.
 
Yeah, that's roughly what I assumed with regard to baking time. The real concern for me was whether reducing the dry ingredient volume by half would result in a stiff enough dough for cookies. I assume you're using an equal measure of Splenda as you would of sugar, and just ending up with sweeter cookies?
 
I am confused...you keep peanut butter in the fridge?
 
I do, Steven. My peanut butter is peanuts and salt and that's it. The thing about that sort of peanut butter is that the cooler you keep it, the less the oils separate out (which means less stirring necessary). Plus, you know, if it got really hot in the cupboard in the summer, the oil could go off (as there's no preservatives). Less likely, but still.
 
If it's real peanut butter—i.e., not Jif, Skippy, Peter Pan, or any of that other crap—it needs refrigeration.
 
Craziness. Learn something new every day.

Weird how the natural stuff tastes awful to you if you grow up eating JIFF. Holds true for most things probably.
 
J, Splenda measures (mostly) cup-for-cup like sugar. I'm talking about the plain old granulated splenda, not the baking blend. It is a tiny bit sweeter, but since I don't use sweetened peanut butter, they actually taste more like cookies.
 
So it does. I have both; I'd forgotten that the sugar blends measure differently from pure granulated Splenda.
 
Steven, I grew up on the peanut butter from the peanut-butter grinder at Raley's supermarket. It was this ancient, MASSIVE, red-painted metal machine that sounded like it was grinding the very soul out of the peanuts, and then it expelled out a stream of pure peanuttyness into a little container that we paid for by the ounce. By the PEANUT SOUL ounce.

JIF tastes just a tiny bit like plastic to me. I'll still eat it, because peanut butter, but still.
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