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Antonio Ramírez Robredo
Works at Google
Attended Stanford
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The BBC rendering of Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell is really awesome, so far.

(I suspect +Daniel M. Ingram will be into it :)
With magic long since lost to England, two men are destined to bring it back; the reclusive Mr. Norr...
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Just based on that poster there, I daresay Mr Norrell on the right looks far stranger than Jonathan Strange. In fact Jonathan Strange looks rather Jonathan Cutebutotherwiselargelyunremarkable.
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Everyone watch this hilarious movie. With Jemaine from Flight of the Conchords.

(In theaters now.)
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One Woman, 17 British Accents - Anglophenia Ep 5: http://youtu.be/FyyT2jmVPAk
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Mary Poppins Sings Death Metal: http://youtu.be/iU2hy0L5lgg
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Yeah! Thanks for sending that little gem along.
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One reason I haven't been blogging is that I've been tinkering with an audio synthesis tool for OSX written in Haskell.

You hook up modules in the GUI just like a real modular synth. Under the hood it actually compiles and builds a C module that does the synthesis. This works because C compilers are pretty damn fast. Each time you rewire the "patch" new C code is generated that smoothly (if you're lucky and have enough cores) carries on with the previous state. I hope that eventually it'll generate standalone code you can run on an Arduino, say.

Modules include everything from bit operations for one line symphonies, through mathematical operations allowing you to implement things like the logistic equation, to band-limited emulation of analogue oscillators and filters.

This is not a release. This is research code still in progress. It's incomplete. It's 99% undocumented. It stops suddenly if you do inappropriate things. But it can do stuff now. And people might like to tinker with it and I'd be interested to know if anyone else can build it successfully. (I'm not very good with cabal and that shows.)

It uses no other audio synthesis libraries, or even GUI libraries (apart from Gloss). The whole thing was built from scratch as a learning experience. (Gloss is great, but not appropriate for this task and it uses much more CPU time than the audio code.)

This is mainly GUI code. GUI code is not my forte and I only know how to build UIs imperatively. (I used the reinversion of control free monad I've mentioned in my blog.)

There was some interesting mathematics involved in deriving the code for the band-limited oscillators, especially getting hard sync to work. I'll write that up separately some time.

There is complete separation of the GUI from the back end. It could generate any kind of code, not just audio code.

I can't imagine having written this code without lenses. Thanks +Edward Kmett and others!

I hope to one day make an actual release with docs and regression tests.

The code is here: https://github.com/dpiponi/Moodler
Some samples here: https://soundcloud.com/dan-piponi

Note: The html files in the doc/ directory are probably more up-to-date than the README.
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Note to the reader: Some people have been upset that I'm writing more about issues like these lately, and don't want to hear about things like race in America. If you feel this way, you may continue to be disappointed: these things are important, and we need to talk about them. Consider yourself forewarned: there will be more of this. If this makes you unhappy, you may want to stop reading now. But you probably shouldn't: if you find that this brings up lots of complicated emotions for you, that's a sign that you should read more, not less.

I wish that I could give you a short version of this article. But you need to read this, because it's going to be important to our national conversation about many things. Radley Balko has written a deeply researched, detailed article about the system of institutionalized corruption by which municipalities across Missouri are essentially treating their poor -- especially their black poor -- as a resource to be harvested and consumed to line their own pockets.

The basic idea is simple and should be familiar to anyone who's watched loansharks at work: they start with a fine for something -- say, having expired tags on your car, not having proof of insurance, or (I kid you not) "wearing saggy pants." If you don't have a lawyer (and they've made sure that you won't have one unless you're rich enough to hire one), then you don't simply pay the fine; instead, you have a series of court dates. The message seems to somehow have gone out to the public that if you go to one of these dates and can't afford the fine, you'll go to jail -- so people miss the dates, and are then arrested for that, instead. Then they get fined for that, as well. As well as fines for not paying the fines, and so on, and so forth. 

It's brutally effective, and it's why you hear so much concern about towns which are 90% black with a police force that's almost entirely white and living in a different town: that police force is, generally, running one of these schemes, together with a local government that's arranging all of the payments. (Guess where all the money for this goes? Hint: it's not the town general fund. At least, not the town where any of the people being imprisoned live.) When the people writing and "enforcing" (I use the term loosely) the laws have no ties to the people being charged under them, you have a sophisticated extortion racket, and no rule of law.

This article is extensive and detailed, and by the time you get through it, you should have a painfully clear picture of how it works. There are probably two other things you should read in conjunction with it: Ta-Nehisi Coates' now-famous article about similar corruption of the housing system (http://www.theatlantic.com/features/archive/2014/05/the-case-for-reparations/361631/), and the book I'm working through now, Douglas A. Blackmon's Pulitzer Prize-winning Slavery by Another Name. (http://www.amazon.com/Slavery-Another-Name-Re-Enslavement-Americans/dp/0385722702) I suspect that these three will give you a very good picture of some of the "hidden corruption," of the darkest form imaginable, which plagues our country to this day.
The uprising in Ferguson was an inevitable reaction to the institutional racism coursing through the area for decades.
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Have him in circles
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Today, we're glad to announce the launch of the new 3D feature on the Google Cultural Institute website: http://goo.gl/1p93XR

You can now admire hundreds of multi-dimensional objects from our six pilot partners' collections, from the extensive set of animal skulls of the +California Academy of Sciences (http://goo.gl/xQyk3F) to the Oldest Mask in the world at +The Israel Museum, Jerusalem(http://goo.gl/HtGFhy). #3D #artstech
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Awesome!
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New research shows the city's congestion pricing reduces accidents by 40 percent.
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The Tinycrumb Ghastlies by trixiebedlam on Flickr.


a tribute to E. Gorey
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Thumb status. 
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The knife had just been professionally sharpened. I knew that it was safer than its previously duller form, and that probably made me careless.
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Note to the reader: Some people have been upset that I'm writing more about issues like these lately, and don't want to hear about things like race in America. If you feel this way, you may continue to be disappointed: these things are important, and we need to talk about them. Consider yourself forewarned: there will be more of this. If this makes you unhappy, you may want to stop reading now. But you probably shouldn't: if you find that this brings up lots of complicated emotions for you, that's a sign that you should read more, not less.

I wish that I could give you a short version of this article. But you need to read this, because it's going to be important to our national conversation about many things. Radley Balko has written a deeply researched, detailed article about the system of institutionalized corruption by which municipalities across Missouri are essentially treating their poor -- especially their black poor -- as a resource to be harvested and consumed to line their own pockets.

The basic idea is simple and should be familiar to anyone who's watched loansharks at work: they start with a fine for something -- say, having expired tags on your car, not having proof of insurance, or (I kid you not) "wearing saggy pants." If you don't have a lawyer (and they've made sure that you won't have one unless you're rich enough to hire one), then you don't simply pay the fine; instead, you have a series of court dates. The message seems to somehow have gone out to the public that if you go to one of these dates and can't afford the fine, you'll go to jail -- so people miss the dates, and are then arrested for that, instead. Then they get fined for that, as well. As well as fines for not paying the fines, and so on, and so forth. 

It's brutally effective, and it's why you hear so much concern about towns which are 90% black with a police force that's almost entirely white and living in a different town: that police force is, generally, running one of these schemes, together with a local government that's arranging all of the payments. (Guess where all the money for this goes? Hint: it's not the town general fund. At least, not the town where any of the people being imprisoned live.) When the people writing and "enforcing" (I use the term loosely) the laws have no ties to the people being charged under them, you have a sophisticated extortion racket, and no rule of law.

This article is extensive and detailed, and by the time you get through it, you should have a painfully clear picture of how it works. There are probably two other things you should read in conjunction with it: Ta-Nehisi Coates' now-famous article about similar corruption of the housing system (http://www.theatlantic.com/features/archive/2014/05/the-case-for-reparations/361631/), and the book I'm working through now, Douglas A. Blackmon's Pulitzer Prize-winning Slavery by Another Name. (http://www.amazon.com/Slavery-Another-Name-Re-Enslavement-Americans/dp/0385722702) I suspect that these three will give you a very good picture of some of the "hidden corruption," of the darkest form imaginable, which plagues our country to this day.
The uprising in Ferguson was an inevitable reaction to the institutional racism coursing through the area for decades.
1
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
826 people
tom sullivan's profile photo
Andy Coke's profile photo
luis changsut's profile photo
Gozen Zen priest's profile photo
Raman Das Mahatyagi's profile photo
Brad Schwagler's profile photo
Jessie Gu's profile photo
Sander Takens's profile photo
rashid awan's profile photo
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Basic Information
Gender
Male
Other names
José Antonio Ramírez Robredo
Work
Occupation
type type type. press enter occasionally.
Employment
  • Google
    Software Engineer, present
  • Microsoft
  • IBM
  • University of British Columbia
Education
  • Stanford
    PhD in Mathematics, 2000 - 2005
  • MIT
    Math / Computer Science, 1995 - 2000
  • Instituto Pierre Faure
    learned how to avoid gym class
  • Jardín de Niños Pee-Wee
    tying my shoelaces and stuff
  • Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Campus Guadalajara
    rote creativity
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