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Antoine Truong
Works at Thales Solutions Asia
Attended ISEP (Paris)
Lives in Singapore
74 followers|220,849 views
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For those who do not want to receive unsolicited telemarketing calls or messages.
This registry is maintained by the Singaporean government and is effective from 2014.
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The cat roams free in the house..
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How music should be played.
 
Flash mob -- Beethoven's Ode to Joy ... perhaps the best piece of music ever written and especially appropriate in this season of joy.
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Beans and astronauts 
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Those memories!
I remember having to turn the cassette or tape to load the second part of the application (it was games most of the time).

"The way of the exploding fist": what a memorable game!

So according to the post it was about 100kb game given the time I had to wait (roughly 20 minutes).

Not so bad.

Few years earlier I did not have any media available on my even older Commodore Vic 20 so I had to copy and type the game source code from a book! It was in Basic language with tons of lines of DATA commands followed by a list of cryptic hexa numbers.
Probably about an hour later I will run the mythic command "run" and see either a syntax error or another mysterious error due to a typo mistake.. Then followed long minutes of rechecking the code with the book. (I won't call it debugging).
When everything was fine I could finally see the game I had typed, running with a few pixels moving on the screen.
And no joystick nor mouse of course.. We came from a long way.

PS: I was about 6-7 years old
 
Vintage Computing: The Datasette
Last Sunday's post about the Floppy Drive Mountain was a lot of fun and got an amazing amount of feedback, but today I'm going for something much more mundane: the Commodore Datasette.

It was the cheap alternative to the floppy drive - using regular audio cassettes for data storage was a pretty good idea going back to the earlier Commodore computers like the PET, which actually had a built-in tape drive in its first incarnation. So it was only logical that the Commodore 64 should also benefit from this simple and inexpensive alternative to the much more expensive disk drive, but it didn't last long until the floppy drive took over and the cassette drive was almost obsolete in the Commodore world. But many other 8-bit home computers like the Atari 400/800 and the Sinclair ZX Spectrum also relied on cassette data storage, the Amstrad CPC even came equipped with a tape drive in the computer itself.

When I got my Commodore 64 back in March 1989, I actually got it together with the Datasette pictured above. It's the 1530 or C2N, one of only two different models produced for the Commodore 64 - it was actually a pretty cheap affair, a somewhat rickety and noisy cassette drive with some basic electronics inside. It was extremely cumbersome to use, the loading and saving of programs took a long, long time, sometimes up to 20 minutes - the speed was actually about 50 bytes per second. It was possible to fit up to 120-130 kilobytes on a 30-minute cassette side, so the storage space was actually quite roomy. The datasette was also very reliable if you used good tapes, but finding your program on a cassette full of saved files could take some time because you had to load through all the files saved before it if you didn't write down a counter number to spool to.

Together with my C64 and Datasette, I got a few games on tape just to try out the computer, but these were actually quite boring and disappointing. Later I found out that I had accidentially grabbed some from a line of cheap budget releases from a british company called Mastertronic - the best thing with these games, which would load for more than ten or fifteen minutes, were the cassette covers, title graphics and tunes! Some of the games even had a Space Invaders mini-game clone running during the loading process, which was a pretty nifty programming trick, but the games themselves were still rubbish. This was mainly because all the really good Commodore 64 games at that time were not even sold on tape here in Germany anymore and only some cheap stuff was still available.

Because of the limited software available on cassette, the Datasette didn't last long and I got a proper floppy drive, the famous 1541-II, only about four or five weeks after the computer itself. The Datasette was simply a beginner's mistake and the floppy drive finally made my Commodore 64 a proper computer. I still held on to the Datasette and I've still got it today, but I think it doesn't work properly anymore - when I pulled it out of its package a few years ago, the motor refused to start. Maybe it just clogged up after not having been used for so long, something which never happened to my floppy drives!

There's also a bonus picture of some of the old cassettes over on the parallel blog post here:
blog.bibra-online.de/2013/12/15/vintage-computing-the-datasette/
#VintageComputing   #Datasette   #Commodore  
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Have him in circles
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Virtual assistants gossips
 
The whole gang's here!
Cortana is the newest member of the virtual assistant family, so we thought we'd get the whole crew together for a chat. Turns out getting a sit-down between Siri, and Google Now is not only funny, but also a great glimpse at how the world will work after the machines finally take over.
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You ought to see this page, super charged with strong images.
Not for the faint hearted. Some are shocking but that's life.

One that touched me was the picture about the teacher and student violinist.
Do scroll through the entire post as some gems are hidden below.
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A comprehensive list of tools for developers, on Windows
 
The 2014 Ultimate Tools List is out!
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Alexey Pakseykin's profile photoSebastian Rodriguez's profile photo
 
Chocolatey should be useful.
Overall, all these is catching up and just extend the dead end. :)
The tool which ultimately save lives of Windows developers is Linux. :)
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How about only sleeping 2-5 hours per day?
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Sylvain Bougerel's profile photoAntoine Truong's profile photo
2 comments
 
A person who is not sleeping for days can go insane.

With the NeuroOn we may be missing more than just a few hours saved. One may feel some side effects after years. Who knows? We have not completely understood how we sleep.

But it could be great to enjoy more hours awake (during holidays!) .
For me, if it can solve jet lag problems, I am sold.

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People
Have him in circles
74 people
Varun Rai's profile photo
Nicolas Goupil's profile photo
Yu Feng TANG's profile photo
Meina Chi's profile photo
Education
  • ISEP (Paris)
    1995 - 2000
  • Lycée Condorcet (Paris)
    1992 - 1995
Basic Information
Gender
Male
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Work
Employment
  • Thales Solutions Asia
    Senior Technical Manager, 2000 - present
  • Bluewave (UK)
    1996 - 1997
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Singapore
Previously
France - Italy - France - UK - Singapore
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