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Antje Cobbett
4,198 followers -
Remote Writer, Blogger, Google Local Guide, Web Designer
Remote Writer, Blogger, Google Local Guide, Web Designer

4,198 followers
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Brilliant - easy - fun!

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A new fiber that can be woven into clothes, and harvest solar power from the light that falls on it, making it so that your jacket or sweater could power your phone. You would never never need to plug it in to a wall socket ever again.
Fittingly, the inspiration for this futuristic invention comes from the movie Back to the Future Part II.
That movie was the motivation Jayan Thomas of the NanoScience Technology Center, University of Central Florida told UCF News If you can develop self-charging clothes or textiles, you can realize those cinematic fantasies, that’s the cool thing.

Thomas's new fabric is based on his previous work, where he invented a cable that can also store energy like a battery, and solar panels which let light pass through them. This new material is made from copper ribbons with solar cells on one side, and energy storage on the other.
Thomas and his team actually used a traditional loom to weave these nanofiber filaments into a fabric that can both harvest and store energy.

A fabric like this isn't just a gimmick. Pretty much everyone is already using wearable tech, given that your phone never leaves your body, and all of our gadgets have their own batteries which must be charged. And while solar is already a viable option, you need two devices, one to capture energy and one to store it, in addition to the gadget than needs power.
Now, plugging your iPhone into your jacket might not be the most practical solution, but it's a lot more practical than carrying a solar panel, batteries, and cables when you take a quick walk to the local supermarket...

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Two acres of land is enough to farm a sustainable food supply for as many as 150 people, and now a San Francisco startup is making it even easier to get that farm growing. Farm From a Box is a shipping container kit that holds all the essentials for setting up a two-acre farm (except the land, of course).
Founders Brandi DeCarli and Scott Thompson got the idea after working on a youth center in Kenya where shipping containers were being used to substitute where infrastructure lacked.
That project didn’t address food insecurity, though, which led DeCarli and Thompson to found their own venture specifically for that purpose.

Farm From a Box is a kit designed to make it easier for all types of organizations to start growing sustainable food. Nonprofit humanitarian agencies, schools, community groups, and even individuals can buy a $50,000 kit, which comes with a complete water system including a solar-powered pump and drip irrigation system.
Together, those features help conserve water by using it more efficiently, delivering water directly to the roots of growing plants.
All of the kit’s components are solar-powered, so the kit also includes 3 kW of solar energy capacity which is enough to power the water pump as well as WiFi connectivity that makes it possible to monitor the farm conditions remotely. Because the built-in solar power technology generates more than enough energy to power the farm’s equipment, the farm is suitable to run completely off the grid.
All the prospective farmer needs to have is viable land, of course, and seeds. Luckily, the Farm From a Box team realizes that farming is largely about skill and science, so the kit also includes three stages of training materials on sustainable farming, farm technology and maintenance, as well as the business of farming.
In a recent interview with Smithsonian Magazine, DiCarli explained that the farm kit was designed to “act as a template” and that it’s possible to “plug in” components that specifically fit the farm’s local climate and the farmers’ needs. Those options include internal cold storage, to help preserve crops between harvest and consumption or sale, and a water purification system, if needed.

So far, Farm From a Box has deployed one prototype at Shone Farm in Sonoma County, California.
A project of Santa Rosa Junior College, the farm is part of a larger outdoor laboratory in which students learn how to cultivate crops in drought conditions, and then the harvest is used to supply the farm’s own community-supported agriculture (CSA) program as well as the college’s culinary arts program.
DiCarli said the Shone Farm prototype turned out to be “more efficient than we had even planned,” with “really high” production and energy output. Farm From a Box has a number of other potential sites lined up already, in Ethiopia, Nepal, Bhutan, and Afghanistan, as well as additional test farms in California and a veteran-partnered site in Virginia.

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... on my way!

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With English subtitles
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