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A genetic and cultural analysis, published in Nature, of 83 Aboriginal Australians and 25 Papuans from New Guinea paints a suggests there was just one wave of humans out of Africa, 72,000 years ago. These these early migrants gave rise to all contemporary non-Africans, including indigenous Australians and Papuans. This group descended directly from the first people to inhabit the continent some 50,000 years ago. That makes them world’s longest running civilization.

Jump on over to Anthropology.net to read more about this study as well as a couple other interesting finds... 
A genetic and cultural analysis, published in Nature, of 83 Aboriginal Australians and 25 Papuans from New Guinea paints a suggests there was just one wave of humans out of Africa, 72,000 years ago…
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When Joshua Hinson saw that his ancestral Chickasaw language was disappearing, he decided to help build an online presence and create a smartphone app to make the language accessible. His efforts have been a success; a great example of using technology to save endangered languages. 
There are many endangered languages in our collective linguistic radar. Some of them have been covered here before and some haven’t. In 2007, Joshua Hinson of Chickasaw heritage, identified t…
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An interesting study published late last month in Nature looks into the cause of death of Lucy, the famous the 3.2 million-year-old Australopithecus fossil. The authors identify a bunch of pathologic fractures that suggest she fell from a tree and died. However not everyone is convinced that's the story, not even Dr. Johanson, the man who discovered Lucy. What do you think?
Four decades after the discovery of Lucy, her remains are quite possibly the most famous discovery in paleoanthropology and one of the more important. The impact of finding a nearly entire skeleton…
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In two papers published in the South African Journal of Science, researchers say they've found the oldest definitive evidence of malignancy in a hominid. Prior to this discovery, the oldest known hominin tumor was found in the rib of a Neanderthal dating back to around 120,000 years ago.
In two papers published in the South African Journal of Science, researchers say they’ve found the oldest definitive evidence of malignancy in a hominid. Prior to this discovery, the oldest k…
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Curious and complicated stalagmite circles from a cave site in Southwestern France date to 176,000 years ago, a time when only Neanderthals were in Europe. This find indicates they were creating intricate and symbolic structures that required community and cooperation hundreds of thousands of years ago.
A pile of hundreds of broken stalagmite pieces found deep inside Bruniquel cave, France were made by humans from about 176,000 years ago. The ancient structures are actually made of more than 400 p…
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A new study revises the date of the Hobbit of Flores, Indonesia... Ultimately clarifying that these tiny humans likely did not live on the island concurrently with modern humans, and if they did they lived only for a short while -- likely being forced into extinction.  
Discovered in 2003 in Liang Bua cave, Homo floresiensis stood about three and a half feet tall and weighed around 75 lbs. Because of their stature, they were nicknamed for the diminutive heroes in …
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Just what did Ötzi the Iceman's voice sound like. A reconstruction of his vocal cords using CT data gives us an idea...
The team behind Ötzi the Iceman reconstructed his vocal cords using a series of CT scans. They announced the project back in February. After recontrustrion of the length of the larynx, they then ra…
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The Washington Post documents an interesting story of two Awa women who escape modernity and return back to their traditional lifestyle in the Amazon. 
Over at the Washington Post, there’s an interesting article documenting how two Amazonian Awá tribeswomen have escaped the modern life after being forced out of their traditional life styles.…
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A new GWA study in Biological Psychiatry looks at the evolutionary history of Schizophrenia and helps us understand that Neanderthals, in particular, can't be faulted at the inheritance of this mental illness. This is an interesting application of paleogenomics and modern day medicine. Hop on over to Anthropology.net to see the details of the study and a link to the original source.
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More evidence has come out of northern Belgium, from a cave site aged to be approx. 40,000 BCE to support that Neanderthals were in fact cannibals. Click the link to read more about this fascinating find and also to the primary source published in Nature.
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Why do you think there are no Neanderthal genes in the Y chromosome where there is on average 4% of Neanderthal DNA in the rest of the modern human genome?
Modern humans carry up to 4% Neanderthal DNA but a new paper reveals that the Neanderthal Y chromosome is distinct from any found in humans today. One would expect that since this ancient legacy of…
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A new paper in Nature compares 93 different cultures, and summarizes that ritual human sacrifice paved the way for cultural complexity. What do you think?
Anthropologists from New Zealand have collected evidence that suggests that ritualized human sacrifice was a formative rite that paved way for the large scale, stratified societies we live in today…
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Anthropology.net’s mission is to create a cohesive online community of individuals interested in anthropology. This website intends to promote and facilitate discussion, review research, extend stewardship of resources, and disseminate knowledge. To serve the public interest, we seek the widest possible engagement with all segments of society, including professionals, students, and anyone who is interested in advancing knowledge and enhancing awareness of anthropology.
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