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Anthony Castelli
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Cincinnati motorcycle attorney of the +Law Office of Anthony D. Castelli  interviewed by 96 Rocks Axy Rose. get the #1 safety tip for all new riders that could save your life
#cincinnatimotorcycleattorney
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+Robin R. Scroggie where is your article?
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This should be a really great seminar . I personally know +Richard P. Hastings and he is brilliant
In auto accident claims, more than 70% of all insurers use Colossus and similar software to assess bodily injury claim values and limit defense settlement offers. Plaintiff counsel must understand how the software works, its limitations, and how it impacts insurer settlement offers to claimants.
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Who can help me make this app for the future that is now +Circle of Legal Trust 
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Please share if you think this is meaningful for our country . I do 
 
American Military’s Place in Preserving Freedom for the United States

Roosevelt was preparing the nation for war in his 1941 State of the Union Address.  Known today as the Four Freedoms speech[1], Roosevelt distilled our concept of liberty down to four items:

Freedom of Speech
Freedom of Worship
Freedom From Want
Freedom From Fear

Norman Rockwell memorialized these concepts in four famous paintings.

Although controversial at the time, I think most of us would accept this definition.  Freedom of speech and worship appear every day in our national discourse.  Their meaning is clear.  Freedom from want and fear are more ambiguous.  They’re not terms we use today, but they encompass familiar concepts.  Pursuing the “American Dream” is how we find freedom from want.  Access to that dream is provided by equal opportunity.  Justice, civil liberties, the military, and the ability to seek redress of grievances are the tools that free us from fear.

Roosevelt was telling the nation that to preserve these freedoms we would need to defeat Fascism.  The rest of his speech is rarely mentioned but worth noting.  He makes the point that only once, during the Civil War, was the nation truly in peril.  The military had fought in many campaigns, but these were to protect commerce or American interests.  His purpose was to emphasize the severity of the current threat.  We could invert that logic, however, and evaluate our recent conflicts in the same vein.  Have our wars been about freedom and sovereignty, or are they about protecting lesser interests?

As I write this on Memorial Day weekend, the safe thing is to wax eloquently about sacrifice, fill these pages with patriotic rhetoric, and never really address the question.  I could do that.  To equate war—the military’s primary domain—with freedom is natural.  But like Orwell’s “war is peace” motto, it’s also shortsighted.  Our military does preserve our freedom.  It’s just not as simple as the Facebook memes would have it.  I’m going to identify what I see as tangible threats to our freedom, and offer five ways today’s military preserves it.

The first threat is the obvious one:  hostile invasion.  We often imagine ourselves surrounded by enemies massing to strike.  Protected by two great oceans, we are practically invulnerable.  Nevertheless, existential threats could arise.

More likely, we can face internal threats if our institutions aren’t resilient enough.  Fear is a powerful force.  In an era of stateless terrorism, we have the capacity to sacrifice our freedom for an illusion of security[2]. 

Freedom House, a research organization, evaluates the status of freedom around the world.  They report the greatest threat to freedom in America is racial inequality[3].  If you accept as axiomatic that individual liberty should be broadly distributed to all citizens, then our system (whatever the cause) is flawed.  A criminal justice system skewed to incarcerate 1 in 3 black men and thereby deny many of them the right to vote runs counter to this broadly distributed freedom.  Likewise, access to the American Dream is limited by a wide gap in socioeconomic conditions exacerbated by race.

To summarize, the threats to our freedom can come from external militant forces and from internal social problems.

The military was the vanguard in establishing racial equality.  Much criticized as being “social experimentation,” integration within the ranks was very successful.  With its discipline and professionalism, the military did what no other component of society could do.  They knocked the wind out of those arguing that discrimination was the natural order of things. 

The effort continues today.  No organization is as color-blind as the military.  That same zeal is being applied to female and gay service members.  Again, this effort is not without controversy or failure, but it will succeed.  Before I was selected for medical school, I had three nominations to the Naval Academy.  The interviewers volunteered in detail the military’s commitment to ending discrimination and sexual harassment.  They are leading the way for the rest of the nation.

Second, the military offers opportunities to those who otherwise have none.  The military can take a young person, regardless of background, and teach them job skills.  Beyond that, they learn teamwork, how to follow instructions, and accountability.  The Montgomery GI Bill and other programs provide educational opportunities.  For many, the military can be a safe harbor—a family—that gives them a better life, i.e. freedom from want.

Third, veterans make good citizens.  Of recent, citizenship is characterized by rights and entitlements[4].  We don’t consider its obligations, but veterans are an exception.  One need only browse the Internet to find countless examples of veterans helping each other (or ordinary citizens).  They take the concept of brotherhood to heart.  We don’t have that same commitment in civil society, and we benefit by their example.

Fourth, the military is fervently apolitical.  It’s part of their professional creed and contributes greatly to the trust placed in them by the public.  We don’t fear our military.  Our officer corps submits itself to civilian control by its professionalism, not just by law[5].  In other countries with a strong military (think of Egypt), they are perennially interfering in the affairs of state.

Our military protects us from fear-inspired excesses.  They do this simply by being professional and trusted.  Fear mongers will always peddle some threat for political gain, but that fear can be assuaged if there’s no doubt in our military’s ability to prevail. 

And finally, the military fulfills its primary mission.  It deters any credible threat to the sovereignty of the United States.  No nation can seriously contemplate an invasion of the United States.  Our Republic is well defended, and can only be diminished by what we choose to do to ourselves.

 

[1] "Our Documents: Four Freedoms." Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 May 2015.

[2] Ludlow, Peter. "Fifty States of Fear." The New York Times, 14 Jan. 2014. Web.

[3] Puddington, Arch, Thomas O. Melia, and Jason Kelly. Today's American: How Free? New York: Freedom House, 2008. Print.

[4] Sheehan, James J. "The Future of Conscription: Some Comparative Reflections." Daedalus 140.3 (2011): 112-21. Web.

[5] Huntington, Samuel P. The Soldier and the State: The Theory and Politics of Civil-military Relations. Cambridge: Belknap of Harvard UP, 1957. Print.

http://www.castellilaw.com/blog/law-office-of-anthony-d-castelli-awards-veterans-scholarship-winner.html-2
Essay that won the scholarship. Please share 
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Anthony Castelli personal injury Attorney of the +Law Office of Anthony D. Castelli quoted about mass shooting cases
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5 critical tips in this Ohio personal injury guide on winning your claim fro
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Ohio dog bite law for innocent victims of dog bites.

#dogbiteattorney   #dogbitehelp  
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Anthony Castelli

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American Military’s Place in Preserving Freedom for the United States

Roosevelt was preparing the nation for war in his 1941 State of the Union Address.  Known today as the Four Freedoms speech[1], Roosevelt distilled our concept of liberty down to four items:

Freedom of Speech
Freedom of Worship
Freedom From Want
Freedom From Fear

Norman Rockwell memorialized these concepts in four famous paintings.

Although controversial at the time, I think most of us would accept this definition.  Freedom of speech and worship appear every day in our national discourse.  Their meaning is clear.  Freedom from want and fear are more ambiguous.  They’re not terms we use today, but they encompass familiar concepts.  Pursuing the “American Dream” is how we find freedom from want.  Access to that dream is provided by equal opportunity.  Justice, civil liberties, the military, and the ability to seek redress of grievances are the tools that free us from fear.

Roosevelt was telling the nation that to preserve these freedoms we would need to defeat Fascism.  The rest of his speech is rarely mentioned but worth noting.  He makes the point that only once, during the Civil War, was the nation truly in peril.  The military had fought in many campaigns, but these were to protect commerce or American interests.  His purpose was to emphasize the severity of the current threat.  We could invert that logic, however, and evaluate our recent conflicts in the same vein.  Have our wars been about freedom and sovereignty, or are they about protecting lesser interests?

As I write this on Memorial Day weekend, the safe thing is to wax eloquently about sacrifice, fill these pages with patriotic rhetoric, and never really address the question.  I could do that.  To equate war—the military’s primary domain—with freedom is natural.  But like Orwell’s “war is peace” motto, it’s also shortsighted.  Our military does preserve our freedom.  It’s just not as simple as the Facebook memes would have it.  I’m going to identify what I see as tangible threats to our freedom, and offer five ways today’s military preserves it.

The first threat is the obvious one:  hostile invasion.  We often imagine ourselves surrounded by enemies massing to strike.  Protected by two great oceans, we are practically invulnerable.  Nevertheless, existential threats could arise.

More likely, we can face internal threats if our institutions aren’t resilient enough.  Fear is a powerful force.  In an era of stateless terrorism, we have the capacity to sacrifice our freedom for an illusion of security[2]. 

Freedom House, a research organization, evaluates the status of freedom around the world.  They report the greatest threat to freedom in America is racial inequality[3].  If you accept as axiomatic that individual liberty should be broadly distributed to all citizens, then our system (whatever the cause) is flawed.  A criminal justice system skewed to incarcerate 1 in 3 black men and thereby deny many of them the right to vote runs counter to this broadly distributed freedom.  Likewise, access to the American Dream is limited by a wide gap in socioeconomic conditions exacerbated by race.

To summarize, the threats to our freedom can come from external militant forces and from internal social problems.

The military was the vanguard in establishing racial equality.  Much criticized as being “social experimentation,” integration within the ranks was very successful.  With its discipline and professionalism, the military did what no other component of society could do.  They knocked the wind out of those arguing that discrimination was the natural order of things. 

The effort continues today.  No organization is as color-blind as the military.  That same zeal is being applied to female and gay service members.  Again, this effort is not without controversy or failure, but it will succeed.  Before I was selected for medical school, I had three nominations to the Naval Academy.  The interviewers volunteered in detail the military’s commitment to ending discrimination and sexual harassment.  They are leading the way for the rest of the nation.

Second, the military offers opportunities to those who otherwise have none.  The military can take a young person, regardless of background, and teach them job skills.  Beyond that, they learn teamwork, how to follow instructions, and accountability.  The Montgomery GI Bill and other programs provide educational opportunities.  For many, the military can be a safe harbor—a family—that gives them a better life, i.e. freedom from want.

Third, veterans make good citizens.  Of recent, citizenship is characterized by rights and entitlements[4].  We don’t consider its obligations, but veterans are an exception.  One need only browse the Internet to find countless examples of veterans helping each other (or ordinary citizens).  They take the concept of brotherhood to heart.  We don’t have that same commitment in civil society, and we benefit by their example.

Fourth, the military is fervently apolitical.  It’s part of their professional creed and contributes greatly to the trust placed in them by the public.  We don’t fear our military.  Our officer corps submits itself to civilian control by its professionalism, not just by law[5].  In other countries with a strong military (think of Egypt), they are perennially interfering in the affairs of state.

Our military protects us from fear-inspired excesses.  They do this simply by being professional and trusted.  Fear mongers will always peddle some threat for political gain, but that fear can be assuaged if there’s no doubt in our military’s ability to prevail. 

And finally, the military fulfills its primary mission.  It deters any credible threat to the sovereignty of the United States.  No nation can seriously contemplate an invasion of the United States.  Our Republic is well defended, and can only be diminished by what we choose to do to ourselves.

 

[1] "Our Documents: Four Freedoms." Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 May 2015.

[2] Ludlow, Peter. "Fifty States of Fear." The New York Times, 14 Jan. 2014. Web.

[3] Puddington, Arch, Thomas O. Melia, and Jason Kelly. Today's American: How Free? New York: Freedom House, 2008. Print.

[4] Sheehan, James J. "The Future of Conscription: Some Comparative Reflections." Daedalus 140.3 (2011): 112-21. Web.

[5] Huntington, Samuel P. The Soldier and the State: The Theory and Politics of Civil-military Relations. Cambridge: Belknap of Harvard UP, 1957. Print.

http://www.castellilaw.com/blog/law-office-of-anthony-d-castelli-awards-veterans-scholarship-winner.html-2
Essay that won the scholarship. Please share 
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I'm not rigorous in mind,but I'm doing one part of leaderships on Ame phy as much as Esqui inst in limited.
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Cincinnati personal injury car accident lawyer - Columbus - Ohio
Contact Information
Home
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+1 513-257-8456
Email
Address
8170 corporate Park Drive #220, Cincinnati, Ohio
Work
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1-513-621-2345
Email
Address
8170 corporate park drive #220 Cincinnati, Ohio 45242
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Cincinnati Injury Lawyer Helping People Injured By Others Get Financially Made Whole
Introduction

I am a greater Cincinnati personal injury and car accident  attorney that handles Cincinnati  car accidents,  injury claims, workers compensation attorney, motorcycle accident attorney, personal injury lawyer and social security disability attorney. 


I provide free initial consultation and my web site provides educational materials.

I have practiced law through out Ohio including Columbus, Dayton, Chilicothe, Lebanon, Franklin, Hamilton, Monroe, Middletown Mason, West Chester.

My father was a WWII hero and my grandpa an immigrant tailor. They taught me that we are all created equal, to respect everyone , and to be there with a hand for those in need. So I worked with the mentally handicapped at age 19 and became a social worker helping abused and neglected children. 

I learned that the best people that have the power to fight injustice were the lawyers. So I mentored under Walter Beall , a wonderful personal injury lawyer. He taught me to work hard to protect my clients and focus on their hurts, harms , injury, pain and losses. I've dedicated my professional career now spanning 32 years to justice for injury victims in their fight to get a fair insurance settlement.

So I fight with all my heart to get my clients full and fair compensation. Because I know no other way. 

I have two wonderful teenagers  .

I enjoy motorcycling and reading and writing and music. .

Sometimes I wonder why there is so much tragedy  in the world and am working on myself every day to be a better person that tries to help in some small way. I work as a personal injury attorney to help make a difference in  people's lives that have been hurt or harmed and deserve justice to make up for their hurt and pain   

Cincinnati personal injury Lawyer - My google maps

My practice extends through out the State of Ohio including Columbus, Dayton, . If you can't get to me I can come to you. My desire to help is motivated by uncompromising advocacy and uncompromising compassion.

I have been honored as an Ohio Super lawyer many times and have a preeminent rating by Martindale Hubbell and a superb rating by Avvo . This is the top rating they award.

I have written several books and coauthored a best seller Wolf in Sheep's Clothing. this gives inside secrets about insurance claim practices.

My practice areas include:

Wrongful death claims

Dog Bite injury

Child Injury Claims

Car Accidents

Bodiliy Injury claims

Social Security Disability

Workers Compensation

My promise is  that I will fight with all my heart so that you get the compensation you deserve.

Learn more about accident and injury law and how Anthony Casteii attorney can help at http://www.castellilaw.com



Bragging rights
Co-author of Best Selling Book on insurance injury settlement tips and secrets Wolf in Sheep's Clothing - Ohio verdicts in excess of a million dollars - Listed as an Ohio Super Lawyer in Personal Injury
Work
Occupation
Personal injury attorney, car accident lawyer, dog bite attorney, wrongful death lawyer, motorcycle and truck accident law, accident injury news Ohio, attorney for back, neck, head, serious injury insurance claims
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Dedication and persistence . Negotiation and injury trial
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Male
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Other names
Tony Castelli
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Anthony Castelli's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
Law Office of Anthony D. Castelli
www.castellilaw.com

Many Drivers' Experiences Similar Problems and Questions After a Car Crash There are many issues that arise after a car accident. Some have

Law Office of Anthony D. Castelli
www.castellilaw.com

Press Release : Cincinnati, Ohio 2015

Law Office of Anthony D. Castelli
www.castellilaw.com

The Law Office of Anthony D. Castelli has opened a second office to serve downtown Cincinnati and nearby and surrounding communities. Conven

Law Office Anthony D. Castelli
afsp.donordrive.com

Team fundraising page for Law Office Anthony D. Castelli

Injury Attorney David Slepkow
www.ripersonalinjurylaw.com

Rhode Island Automobile Accident Attorney David Slepkow 401-437-1100 sets forth the basic settlement negotiation tenets.

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This test will analyze a URL and report if the page has a mobile-friendly design. Learn more about the mobile-friendly criteria and how it m

“Marlise’s Law”: Protecting the Autonomy and Dignity of Brain-Dead Pregn...
blogs.law.harvard.edu

Allison M. Whelan, J.D.. Senior Fellow, Center for Biotechnology & Global Health Policy, University of California, Irvine School of Law Gues

Disabled Widow(er)
socialsecuritydisabilityassist.com

Anthony Castelli is very dedicated to his clients, I have had several injuries over the years that Anthony has been my attorney. It all star

Law Office of Anthnony D Castelli
www.merchantcircle.com

Cincinnati personal injury attorney Anthony Castelli founder of the law firm Anthony Castelli Attorney focuses on personal injury law,as a c

Ehline Law Firm PC
www.ehlinelaw.com

Moral and personal injury attorney seem to be at opposite ends. But the reality is that pi lawyer must weigh the ethics to stay in practice.

Cincinnati Personal Injury Lawyer Offers Webinar on Ohio Personal Injury...
www.castellilaw.com

As Cincinnati personal injury lawyer I like to help inform the public on timely personal injury issues. You may be interested in a webinar I

I've known Matt Dolman for over 3 years as a professional colleague. He has demonstrated to me extensive knowledge in the field of personal injury. I see him as a tenacious lawyer, a man that is willing to go to battle for his clients in the Courtroom.
Public - a month ago
reviewed a month ago
Andy has been my physical therapist for over 20 years . He put my knee back together after acl tear. He has helped my back, shoulder and elbow. He is super personable and really gives a damn about his patients. I highly recommend him for physical therapy help in Cincinnati
Public - 4 months ago
reviewed 4 months ago
The fish here is excellent. The atmosphere is welcoming. And for a franchise it is surprisingly good
Public - 5 months ago
reviewed 5 months ago
Lots of great teachers Terri is awesome and Ms Barb is so great. Tony is amazing . High energy very friendly. great place to learn to dance and have a great time . I really enjoy my lessons.
Public - 6 months ago
reviewed 6 months ago
41 reviews
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Dr Mandell-Brown is a true consummate caring professional. He is conservative and did not try to push me into some expensive procedure I did not need. He explained everything in detail. His staff of ladies are charming and welcoming and are all so lovely. It's a fun experience. We are so lucky to have a plastic surgeon like Dr Mandell-Brown right here in Cincinnati.
Public - 5 months ago
reviewed 5 months ago
I have co-counseled numerous motorcycle injury and death claims with Russ Brown. He really knows the motorcycle community. He is a pleasure to deal with. The motorcyclists he has referred to me were thankful for his help.
Public - 5 months ago
reviewed 5 months ago
This place has withstood the test of time. nothing special just great food at great prices
Public - 7 months ago
reviewed 7 months ago