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"[Bishop of Chester] Dr [Peter] Forster said that the Declaration was 'catching up with the Queen', who worships with fellow Anglicans while in England, but publicly attends Church of Scotland services as soon as she crosses the border. ... The Declaration notes a possible problem in such discussions: the lack of bishops in the Presbyterian Church of Scotland. It says: 'We acknowledge that personal, collegial, and communal oversight (episkope) is embodied and exercised in our churches in a variety of forms.' Joint work between the two Churches has already begun. The Churches’ Mutual Credit Union, which offers low-cost credit and savings accounts to priests and church employees, was launched as a partnership between the C of E and the Kirk, along with the Scottish Episcopal Church, the Methodist Church, and the Church in Wales". [http://www.churchtimes.co.uk/articles/2016/8-january/news/uk/scottish-episcopalians-query-columba-declaration]

"'The contents of the chapter on ‘Establishing Shared Foundations: Agreement in Faith’ and of the Columba Declaration itself are closely modelled on existing agreements between the Church of England and other churches, including in particularly the Reuilly Common Statement between the Anglican Churches of Britain and Ireland and the French Lutheran and Reformed Churches,' [Donald Allister, Bishop of Peterborough] said." [http://www.anglicannews.org/news/2016/01/england-scotland-ecumenical-agreement-published.aspx ]
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Pope St. Pius X on the Need to Love the Pope:

"The Pope is the guardian of dogma and of morals; he is the custodian of the principles that make families sound, nations great, souls holy; he is the counsellor of princes and of peoples; he is the head under whom no one feels tyrannized because he represents God Himself; he is the supreme father who unites in himself all that may exist that is loving, tender, divine. It seems incredible, and is even painful, that there be priests to whom this recommendation must be made, but we are regrettably in our age in this hard, unhappy, situation of having to tell priests: love the Pope! And how must the Pope be loved? Not in word, nor in tongue, but in deed, and in truth [1 John 3:18]. When one loves a person, one tries to adhere in everything to his thoughts, to fulfill his will, to perform his wishes. And if Our Lord Jesus Christ said of Himself, 'if any one love Me, he will keep My word' [John 14:23], therefore, in order to demonstrate our love for the Pope, it is necessary to obey him." (18 November 1912)

[Source: http://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2012/11/love-pope-no-ifs-and-no-buts-for.html]
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St. Peter, St. Paul, and the Unity of the Church

"By virtue of their martyrdom, Peter and Paul are in a reciprocal relationship for ever. A favourite image in Christian iconography shows the embrace of the two Apostles on their way to martyrdom. We can say: their martyrdom itself is the realization of a fraternal embrace in the deepest sense. They died for the one Christ and in their witness for which they gave their lives, they are one. In the New Testament writings we can, so to speak, follow the development of their embrace, this creation of unity in witness and mission. Everything begins when Paul, three years after his conversion, goes to Jerusalem 'to visit Cephas' [Galatians 1:18]. Fourteen years later he went up to Jerusalem again to lay 'before those who were of repute' the Gospel he was preaching in order to avoid the risk of 'running or [having] run in vain' [Galatians 2:1-2]. At the end of this encounter, James, Cephas and John shake hands with him, thus confirming the communion that links them in the one Gospel of Jesus Christ [Galatians 2:9]. I find the fact that the collaborators mentioned at the end of the First Letter of Peter - Silvanus and Mark - were likewise close collaborators of St Paul is a beautiful sign of the growth of this inner embrace which developed despite the diversity of their temperaments and tasks. The communion of the one Church is clearly demonstrated by the embrace of the great Apostles, in their cooperation."

-- Pope Benedict XVI, 29 June 2008 (http://www.clerus.org/bibliaclerusonline/en/cwj.htm)
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"In the Orthodox Church, for many generations, missionary activities were almost nil. Temporal preoccupations and long drawn-out litigations for Church properties had almost totally absorbed the time and the energy of the clergy. There was very little pastoral ministry for the faithful. Spiritual life was at a very low ebb. The strong religious traditions in the Christian families, healthy personal relations among the spouses, regular prayers and the pious reading of the Word of God, kept the light of faith from fading out. This was the only silver lining in an otherwise dark atmosphere in the Orthodox Church. ... Married priests, among the Orthodox, were to keep sexual abstinence during the period of celebrating the Holy Mysteries. Since in the Catholic Church daily celebration of the Holy Qurbana is customary, it is most appropriate, according to the sense of the faithful, that the Malankara Catholic priests practise perpetual abstinence. ... Priestly celibacy is quite in keeping with the spiritual ethos of India. Mahatma Gandhi, whom Pope John Paul II acknowledged as [']a symbol of the highest qualities and values of the Indian people, and is admired in every country of the world['], said: [']Celibacy is a great help, inasmuch as it enables one to lead a life of full surrender to God... Protestantism did many good things, but one of its few evils was that it ridiculed celibacy. It is celibacy that has kept Catholicism green up to the present day.[']"
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THE Primate of the Anglican Church in North America (ACNA), Dr Foley Beach, was a full, voting participant in the Primates' gathering in Canterbury. He said on Friday that he was handed a ballot paper on Thursday to vote on the fate of the Episcopal Church in the United States but declined it.
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Christianity started in Israel and made its seat in Rome.
The Anglican or English church is nothing more than a very poor counterfeit of the church Christ established through St Peter by Christ.
king Henry VIII was told he couldn't devorce so he started his own religion with him as it's head.
Who cares what this English heresy says or does, it's all meaningless to be honest 
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"The three-year term of the suspension is the amount of time until the next denomination-wide meeting of the Episcopal Church, when it will vote on a response, though other church groups could respond sooner."
(RNS) The vote by Anglican Communion primates to demote the Episcopal Church may have been led by more conservative African Anglican bishops.
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Have them in circles
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The Holy Spirit is active, not some deistic force (cf. John 14:26, Acts 13:2), and the Church both depends on It and speaks for It (cf. Acts 15:28).

[Artist: Giovanni Battista Merano (1632-1698); Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Rogers Fund, 1965 -- http://www.metmuseum.org/collection/the-collection-online/search/340783]
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St. Augustine of Hippo on the 4 Stages of Christian Life:

"When, sunk in the darkest depths of ignorance, man lives according to the flesh undisturbed by any struggle of reason or conscience, this is his first state.

Afterwards, when through the law has come the knowledge of sin, and the Spirit of God has not yet interposed His aid, man, striving to live according to the law, is thwarted in his efforts and falls into conscious sin, and so, being overcome of sin, becomes its slave ('for of whom a man is overcome, of the same is he brought in bondage'); and thus the effect produced by the knowledge of the commandment is this, that sin works in man all manner of concupiscence, and he is involved in the additional guilt of willful transgression, and that is fulfilled which is written: 'The law entered that the offense might abound.' This is man's second state.

But if God has regard to him, and inspires him with faith in God's help, and the Spirit of God begins to work in him, then the mightier power of love strives against the power of the flesh; and although there is still in the man's own nature a power that fights against him (for his disease is not completely cured), yet he lives the life of the just by faith, and lives in righteousness so far as he does not yield to evil lust, but conquers it by the love of holiness. This is the third state of a man of good hope; and he who by steadfast piety advances in this course, shall attain at last to peace, that peace which, after this life is over, shall be perfected in the repose of the spirit, and finally in the resurrection of the body.

Of these four different stages the first is before the law, the second is under the law, the third is under grace, and the fourth is in full and perfect peace. Thus, too, has the history of God's people been ordered according to His pleasure who disposes all things in number, and measure, and weight. For the church existed at first before the law; then under the law, which was given by Moses; then under grace, which was first made manifest in the coming of the Mediator. Not, indeed, that this grace was absent previously, but, in harmony with the arrangements of the time, it was veiled and hidden. For none, even of the just men of old, could find salvation apart from the faith of Christ; nor unless He had been known to them could their ministry have been used to convey prophecies concerning Him to us, some more plain, and some more obscure."

["The Enchiridion" (http://www.newadvent.org/fathers/1302.htm), Chapter 118]
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"...Thus did [the PCUSA] steadily losing members since 1965 miss out on a great deal of publicity—Trump on trial!—if only he had ever joined. ... Perhaps the reason [for Donald Trump's support among Protestants] is that many evangelical voters are willing to set aside concerns they normally take seriously. Indeed, some notable evangelicals are arguing that in Trump's case, they should do just that. Robert Jeffress, pastor of the 12,000-member First Baptist Church in Dallas, contends that evangelical voters, like all other voters, should select as president someone—meaning Trump—who has 'both the leadership skills and tenacity to solve our country's practical problems, such as the immigration dilemma and our economic stagnation.' Other factors don't matter."
Will evangelicals balk at pulling the lever for him?
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"It is now apparent that two facts are placed beyond controversy, one, that [Matthew] Parker was not consecrated by bishops of English sees, another, that the rite used in his consecration, was not then the legal rite ordered to be used by the statutes of the realm. Moreover the commission itself, or mandate for the confirmation and consecration of Parker, implies the want in the consecrating prelates and in the rite used, of something which was deemed essential by the statutes of the realm and by the ecclesiastical laws. ... This defect of legal position and jurisdiction ought to be sufficient to prevent Anglican writers of respectability from repeating the fiction that the present Anglican hierarchy is regularly and legally descended by consecration from the old Catholic hierarchy of England[.]"

-- William Maziere Brady, "Annals of the Catholic Hierarchy in England and Scotland: A.D. 1585-1876" (London, 1883), p. 9-11

See also:

1. http://archive.thetablet.co.uk/article/26th-october-1895/23/queen-elizabeth-and-anglican-orders
2. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f4DwFZ_BAtY
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Sergei Chapnin, author of the First Things article “A Church of Empire” was recently . . . .
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Matthew Olson's take on responding to Protestant questions with Catholic answers.