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Annika “Skywalker” O'Brien
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Malaysian Tamil schools have been neglected for a very long time.  They are severely underfunded because their parents are rubber tappers or other workers at the bottom of the economic rung and the schools are in very poor areas.

However, they've recently been making names for themselves in the STEM field, in the International arena.  They won first prize at the 35th Beijing Youth Science Creation Competition.  Last year, they won the Double Gold Award at the British Invention Show.

Just how the hell did that happen?

It appears that they are all actively involved in the Science Fair for Young Children, organized by the Association of Science, Technology and Innovation (ASTI) - whose objective is to spark an interest in science among school children.

The president, Dr. Mohamed Yunus Yasin​ is the driving force behind this push.  The man is modest - he has always been modest - putting the children and the schools enthusiasm at the front, but if it wasn't for him and ASTI, there would not have been the enthusiasm to begin with.

I have known and worked with many successful people, doctors, surgeons, authors, people who run billion dollar companies - how many people have their resume personally written by a COO of a $3 billion company - but I must say, I'm proudest to have been a friend of this man.  Everyone else had been successful for themselves, but this man is inspiring a whole new generation to be successful.  This man is making the future better for everyone, not just himself.

And for this level of success, how much funding do you think they get?  In 2015 - a whole big ZERO.  They are currently running on fumes and a wish.

Help push this message out so that the powers that be realizes what a jewel they have with this program, and properly fund it instead of letting it wither away.

http://www.thestar.com.my/News/Education/2015/05/24/Tamil-schools-triumph-in-science-fairs/

http://www.asti.org.my/
One man’s vision in triggering an interest in all things science has brought Tamil schools to the limelight.
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Hi
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+Houston Robotics club is meeting and planning the Telepresence robot project today! #Arduino 
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The secrets of the SHELL:
#RaspberryPi #SSH #ChangeYourPasswords
 
Here's why, if your children understand SSH, you should make sure they don't also know your password. This has sparked a lively discussion, and some glorious anecdotes, on our blog post at www.raspberrypi.org/ssh-shenanigans.
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+Nick Mason You're certainly going to make an encouraging parent one day... Anyhow I thought it was nifty.
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Hacked Sphero BB-8 Droid.
As an industrial designer, I’ve been particularly fascinated by products that have personality and emotion. And I think the droids in Star Wars have always been really great at capturing a character without facial expression and drawing you in. And BB-8 was no different when they brought it out onstage …
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Really cool 
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A sperm whale (my favorite whale!) investigates an underwater ROV as a crew takes measurements of the damage caused by the gulf oil spill: #majestic  
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Hello
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With a name like Annika...
How will a barista get your name wrong? Found out at WhatsMyStarbucksName.com.
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Vadler? So close!
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Have them in circles
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ATTN: Northern Cali. Come see ‪#‎BattleBots‬ Championships for FREE. Will be aired on ABC! http://www.eventbrite.com/e/battlebots-tickets-2015-championship-tv-taping-tickets-16680151783?aff=eac2 For FREE TICKETS Use promo code: BBfree Location Mare Island Sports Complex 785 Walnut Ave Mare Island CA, 94592 Shows Session #1 May 21, Thursday Afternoon (11:00am - 3:00pm) Session #2 May 21, Thursday Evening (3:00pm - 7:00pm) Session #3 May 22, Friday Afternoon (10:00am - 3:00pm) Session #4 May 22, Friday Evening (3:00pm - 6:00pm) Session #5 May 23, Saturday All Day (10:00am - 5:00pm) -SOLD OUT! Please share!
Be a Part of BattleBots Triumphant Return to TV! The hit show BattleBots is back, and you can be part of the live audience. Not only will you witness the awesome spectacle of robot-on-robot, metal-munching-mayhem, but you might be seen on the TV show (airing this Summer on ABC)! Bring your friends, bring your family, have a great time and be the first to experience the revamped, reimagined, redesigned BattleBots! Five simple rules: Be On Time:...
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Robots hacking at other robots, how can this not be must see TV?!?
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Would be great for pretty circuits:
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Yep, it's a whole different level of difficulty without the proper tools.
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To figure out how stone tools were used millions of years ago, archaeologists are turning to robots
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That's a pretty incredible use of robotics in the archeological field.

I got a chuckle out of the "oh snap" dig, too.
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Tiling an octagon with centrally symmetric pieces

It is easy to cut an equilateral triangle into four smaller equilateral triangles, or to cut a square into four smaller squares, or to cut a regular hexagon into six equilateral triangles (think of a Trivial Pursuit playing piece). Less obviously, it is possible to cut a regular octagon into polygon-shaped pieces that are both centrally symmetric and convex. Some of these are illustrated in this picture.

The picture comes from the recent paper Decompositions of a polygon into centrally symmetric pieces by Júlia Frittmann and Zsolt Lángi (http://arxiv.org/abs/1504.05418). The introduction of the paper gives a brief survey of some related problems. For example, it is trivial to cut a square into a set of triangles of the same area as each other, as anyone who has tried to cut a square piece of bread into triangles will know. (Note, however, that the resulting triangles will probably not be centrally symmetric.) Given this, it may be surprising to discover that that P. Monsky proved in 1970 that it is impossible to cut a square into an odd number of triangles, all of the same area.

Frittmann and Lángi's paper illustrates all 111 irreducible edge-to-edge decompositions of a regular octagon into convex polygonal pieces (tiles), where each tile is rotationally symmetric about its centre. The 18 decompositions shown in the picture are among the 111 irreducible decompositions.

In order for this classification to make complete sense, some terms need to be defined. A decomposition is called edge-to-edge if each edge of each tile either lies in the boundary of the surrounding polygon, or if it meets the edge of some other tile along the entire length of the edge. A shape is called convex if, whenever two distinct points are chosen within the shape, the straight line connecting the two points lies entirely within the shape. A decomposition with n tiles is called irreducible if, whenever at least 1 but at most n–2 tiles are removed from the decomposition, the remaining tiles form a non-convex shape. 
 
If A and B are tilings of the same polygon, we say that A is equivalent to B if there is a one to one correspondence between the set of tiles of A and the set of tiles of B, in such a way that two tiles of A touch each other in the same way that the corresponding two tiles of B touch each other. [Precise definition for mathematicians: two tilings are equivalent if the face lattices of the corresponding CW-decompositions are isomorphic.] There are infinitely many ways to tile an octagon under the constraints mentioned above, but there are only finitely many different ways up to equivalence. 

The main result of Frittmann and Lángi's paper generalizes this result to the case of a polygon with an even number, 2k, of sides, where k is at least 4. It turns out that in order for such a decomposition to be possible at all, the big polygon needs to be centrally symmetric. The authors show that up to equivalence, there will be a finite number of irreducible edge-to-edge decompositions of a centrally symmetric polygon into centrally symmetric, convex, polygonal parts. For an octagon, this number is 111, and G. Horváth proved in 1997 that the corresponding number for a hexagon is only 6. In their paper, Frittmann and Lángi give an upper bound for the number of decompositions for larger values of k.

It would be interesting to know what happens in the case where the big polygon has an odd number of sides. As I mentioned in the first paragraph, it is clearly possible to do something analogous for an equilateral triangle, although I don't know what would happen in the case of, say, a regular pentagon.

Relevant link
I mentioned CW decompositions above. These are associated to a CW complex, which is an important type of topological space. The “CW” is not somebody's initials, or an American TV channel, but rather stands for “closure-finite” and “weak topology”. The definition of a CW complex is rather technical, but it can be found here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CW_complex

#mathematics #sciencesunday #spnetwork arXiv:1504.05418
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Further reading: Penrose tiles which can tile out to infinity without repeat patterns
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The competition draws more than 40,000 people — who fill local restaurants, hotel rooms and more — for four days each spring. It has been estimated the FirstRobotics Championship has an economic impact of $24 million to $30 million annually on the St. Louis region. In Houston, attendees will be spread out across at least 20 different hotels, Houston First Corp. reported. #FIRSTRobotics  
Houston will host the world's oldest and largest robotics competition in a multiyear deal, bringing well over $20 million in economic impact the first year alone, organizers say.
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Looking foward to the dual Houston/Detoit years. I couldn't go to St. Louis with the team I mentor this year.
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RIP Rosie the Riveter - at 92, she lived a long life as an icon and will continue to live on in our hearts for much longer!
"There was a war on, and you did what you could," Mary Doyle Keefe once said of the Norman Rockwell painting.
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Basic Information
Birthday
December 8
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Celebrity Roboticist. Programmer/Engineer. Philanthropist.
Introduction
I am a full-time Robot builder who makes really cool stuff for a living. In my extra time I teach under-served teens in inner-city Los Angeles how to make robots, including how to program and design the entire thing, mostly from junk. I also offer hands-on Arduino classes all over Los Angeles and Orange County.

I'm not a tomboy. I'm just not willing to play in a world where gender defines one's tastes. I am the love child of Grace Kelly and Thor.