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Serendipity has helped me discover a world that I would have never known before. It is through many accidental intentions that I have come to realize that when I put myself in places I am uncomfortabl...
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Jim Langcuster's profile photo
 
Reading this, I was reminded of a newspaper column I wrote for the O-A News a generation ago titled "Learning Esperanto: A Study in Serendipity." For some reason, I became keenly interested in artificial languages and ended up teaching myself a fair amount of this particularly language, which essentially had been constructed whole cloth from the vocabulary of all the principal European languages. The one thing that stuck with me: How disadvantaged Esperanto was alongside organic language, particularly English, the world most evolved language, which had developed over centuries and largely through serendipitous experiences - linguistic challenges that forced people to adopt creative solutions. That was my serendipitous insight from acquiring a working knowledge of this artificial language. As odd as this sounds, it instilled me with an even deeper appreciation for serendipity, organic growth and, most of all, for the open societies which make this possible. Language, particularly language history. really is a wonderful laboratory in which to gain an appreciation for the open exchange of ideas.
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