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Aner Ben-Artzi
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On why sorting Lego is always a personal strategy:
Many people grow their Lego collection to the point that some sort of organizational system is needed to make finding pieces reasonable (and quiet enough to avoid annoying others in the house)
As a kid, i had three large plastic boxes, and whenever i was in my room, the house must have reverberated with the endless drone of plastic being shifted.
Since i played so much, and was the only one who used the collection, i pretty much had an idea of which pieces where in the boxes, and roughly where they might be.
Jump forward to being an adult (at least chronologically). I have a decently large collection bootstrapped from garage sales. The option to devote the center of a whole room isn't practical. The real motivation for caring about any specific piece is that i need to be able to follow an old set's instructions while allowing the pieces to live in a general pool for off-book designs/elaborations.
Enter the plastic drawers. Not those tiny screw sorters. Unless you're dealing with a static collection and are willing to pay a large space cost due to internal fragmentation, you need drawers that hold groups of pieces.
The trade-off is as follows: have as few groupings as possible while keeping the average seek time reasonable. This is where the grouping must be driven by what's in the collection. Inevitably, you end up with one or more drawers labled (literally or mentally) as "other". The key is to keep those "other" grouping manageable so expected seek tubes don't skyrocket. Instead of trying to group all the easily defined pieces into separate drawers (e.g. 2x2 bricks, 2x4 bricks, 1xn planks, etc.), What you're really doing is minimizing the"other/misc". You could group all the standard rectangular pieces from 1x1 boards to 10x24 bricks in one shallow tub, and the aggregate seek time wouldn't change much. What inevitably costs minutes is the search for a specific non-swappable piece. More importantly, you want to know early on to stop looking because if you haven't found it by now, it's not in the collection. That means the other/misc groups must be small enough for an exchange search.
The only way to achieve that is to excise the "standard pieces".
Whatever your collection had a lot of becomes "standard". Even if it's a special hinge. If you have so many of that item that is grows the "other" as to make exhaustive or "by inspection" search to hard, then you pull out that group and give it a name so it's no longer in the other/misc. At that point, you can join it with an existing standard group. Join it with 1xn bricks if that's the drawer that has space. It doesn't matter. That will be the "special hinge and 1xn brick" drawer. Seek times will not go down. In fact, joining two groups which are clearly different makes it easy to find one or the other without false positives.
I've found that what takes up an unexpected annoying of time is finding the right drawer (especially since i didn't invest in transparent drawers) by minimizing the number of drawers, that goes away.
So next time you're reorganizing you Lego, start with the"other"pile, and pull out meaningful groups to shirk it. Don't start with the easily labled groups just to think of the misc group as a by-product. An easily scannable misc group is the end goal of good organization.

(There's a practice aspect to avoiding groups that have wildly varying sizes, and of course, color shouldn't be a factor, but those are details) happy building.
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Kate Prinsloo's profile photoPhilipp Hatt's profile photo
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I think that you should build a Lego robot that can do the sorting, using some sort of cluster analysis, kmeans has nice properties for keeping all clusters at similar size thus allowing for one parameter tuning the sort/seek tradeoff. 
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If these weren't a real politician and a professional journalist, this would be a poignant skit parodying most of American politics. (If it really was a satire, it wouldn't come off as believable due to the over-caricaturization of the participants.)
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Worth anyone's few minutes to read.
 
Instead of an expression of liberty, the Trump phenomenon is a threat to it.
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+Ken Rabe​, of course it was putting words in your mouth. I said what I thought you were saying and I qualified it with"it seems", leaving room for the fact that I could be wrong.

I now see why a piece about Trump elicited a reply about Hillary. I had taken it as a story about American politics through the lens of Trump. Your explication shows why every story about a candidate can be seen as an anti-story about an opposing candidate. In that light, bringing up Hillary isn't the nonsequiter that I originally thought it was. (Bringing up Sanders still seems like a tangent)
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Maybe the problem isn't that we often don't have good presidential candidates. Maybe the problem is that who the president is matters so much.
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Edited:
I originally posted a question about Dimensional Analysis, but then realized it wasn't written clearly and had typos. Here it is in a doc. Comments are kindly requested:
https://docs.google.com/document/d/132qaDaCt1998sveB3tOWJRrEURgZDRe6f1nqb0oTB84/edit#
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Edited:
I originally posted a question about Dimensional Analysis, but then realized it wasn't written clearly and had typos. Here it is in a doc. Comments are kindly requested:
https://docs.google.com/document/d/132qaDaCt1998sveB3tOWJRrEURgZDRe6f1nqb0oTB84/edit#
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Q: How many 1-dimensional shapes are platonic solids?
A: All of them :)
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The most significant part of this speech had nothing to do with race. It's where Trump clearly endorses "cold-cocking" someone for expressing beliefs that you disagree with. That's not a society I'd want to live in.
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This is not a particularly good nor interesting video. However, I'm sharing it as possibly the supreme example of some of the most eloquent, well-intentioned, and civilized comments I've seen on a YouTube video. I was going to say as much in the videos comments, but I didn't want to taint them with a meta-comnent, which tends to devolve a comment thread. Seriously, I scrolled through quite a lot, and they all seem civil and on-point.
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I'd like to ask for help from physics-minded people. I'm stuck on a rigorous approach to dimensional analysis as described in this doc where I describe the difficulty. Your comments are appreciated.
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Dimensional Analysis and the sqrt of fabricDimensional Analysis and thefabric? Aner Ben-Artzi Context: Trying to explain dimensional analysis and units in a way that doesn’t require intuition and real-world experience with the units. For children (and computer software), working with a given set of conversions should enable them to f...
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There are many things that are sensible which are not true.  That is why we cannot use sense alone to find the truth.

Perhaps you can add examples in the comments.
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I guess basically anything found to be false on snopes.com would constitute a good example.
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Edit:  Only after posting this, I watched the footnote video.  That one basically says what this post was saying, and I don't think it's a footnote at all: It's the real discussion.

CGPGrey recently posted a video about digital encryption.  His videos are always worth watching, but sometimes they are too myopic.  In this case, he ran with the popular metaphor that encryption is like a digital version of physical locks and keys, and that digital data is like a physical version of papers.

Here's a thought experiment: I have a hearing problem, so I get a cochlear implant which has part of it inside my skull.  It processes sound and transmits a signal directly to my auditory nerve.  The sound processing is not a trivial matter and there is a small microchip and on-board memory to capture and digitize the sounds picked up by the microphone.  The on-board memory retains the last 10-20 seconds of input data in order to make better predictive decisions about how to process new sounds, including the volume and noise filtering.  This device is an augmentation of my body and part of my nervous system.  Because it's so important, a wireless diagnostic device can be used to download the on-board data and debug any problems that might occur.

Does a warrant allow police to download the last 20 seconds that I heard without my consent?  Or is this a violation of the 5th amendment?  Even completely separate people such as spouses can invoke the 5th because it's known that they have access to information so personal it's practically getting inside a person's head.  My imagined implant is closer and to me than even my spouse.  It is a part of me.  Downloading information from it is akin to downloading information from my brain directly (e.g. via truth serum).

The point: There are many analogies that can be applied when trying to understand the legal and social constructs of something new (e.g. cell phones that are an extension of your memory and life).  Lock-and-key has been used as a marketing analogy to help people understand encryption.  But augmented memory devices can be used the same.

To take the thought experiment further, imagine I'm Stephen Hawkings, and I have a computer that speaks all my words for me.  A court of law puts me on the stand and asks: "What did you say to Bob in the hallway 10 minutes ago?"  If I take the 5th, can they forceably play back my words to Bob via my speech computer? How would that be different than forcing it out of me directly?

Does it really matter if the device is physically inside my body?
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Back to the digital world: Has society decided if people can be forced to provide their password?  How is answering the question "what's your password?" different than accessing any other part of information inside a person's brain?
If passwords are always accessible, then there is no protection for people's brain/thoughts.
If passwords are protected, then it's just a question of whether the cypher can be cracked without a password.  I think until recently, governments were confident that they could always break the cypher without the password.
Now that it seems they may not be able to keep up with the technology to encode information, they're wondering if they can stay ahead of the technology through legislation.
The same has already happened with bullet-proof vests.  I assume those only became illegal to own when they became good enough to stop a police officer's bullet.
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Wonderful atmosphere, friendly staff, good food.
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Went to get matza ball soup and it had no matzos in it. They charged $15 for a container of salty water and a small amount of noodles.
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
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