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Andrew Wooldridge
Works at ROBLOX Corporation
Attended Murray State University
Lives in California
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Andrew Wooldridge

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With our service you can quickly create a Cartoon of Yourself directly online without any software installs and for free!
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Minecraft's Combat Update Changes the Game in a Big Way

Minecraft’s 1.9 patch—known as the Combat Update—has been in development at Mojang for well over year, and it’s arriving on PC today. So what exactly does it bring to the table? See http://kotaku.com/minecrafts-combat-update-changes-the-game-in-a-big-way-1759856541 for the details.
Minecraft’s 1.9 patch—known as the Combat Update—has been in development at Mojang for well over year, and it’s arriving on PC today. So what exactly does it bring to the table? Let’s take a look.
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Andrew Wooldridge

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Flow

I've been staying at home for the last two days writing a paper about information and entropy in biological systems.  My wife is away, and I'm trying to keep distractions to a bare minimum, trying to get into that state where I'm completely absorbed, there's always something to do, and it's lots of fun.  That's what I love about writing.  At first I feel stuck, frustrated.  But gradually the ideas start falling into place - and once they do, I don't want to be anywhere else!  

This state is called flow, and it's great.  But life can't be all flow, it seems.

I like this chart.  I like any chart that takes psychology and maps it down to a few axes in a reasonably plausible way.  I don't have to 'believe in it' to enjoy a neat picture that pretends to tame the wild mess of the soul. 

Apparently this chart goes back to Mihaly Csikszentmihaly's theory of 'flow'.  According to Wikipedia:

In his seminal work, Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience, Csíkszentmihályi outlines his theory that people are happiest when they are in a state of flow— a state of concentration or complete absorption with the activity at hand and the situation. It is a state in which people are so involved in an activity that nothing else seems to matter.  The idea of flow is identical to the feeling of being in the zone or in the groove. The flow state is an optimal state of intrinsic motivation, where the person is fully immersed in what he is doing. This is a feeling everyone has at times, characterized by a feeling of great absorption, engagement, fulfillment, and skill—and during which temporal concerns (time, food, ego-self, etc.) are typically ignored.

In an interview with Wired magazine, Csíkszentmihályi described flow as "being completely involved in an activity for its own sake. The ego falls away. Time flies. Every action, movement, and thought follows inevitably from the previous one, like playing jazz. Your whole being is involved, and you're using your skills to the utmost."

Csikszentmihályi characterized nine component states of achieving flow including “challenge-skill balance, merging of action and awareness, clarity of goals, immediate and unambiguous feedback, concentration on the task at hand, paradox of control, transformation of time, loss of self-consciousness, and autotelic experience.”

What does autotelic mean?  It seems to mean 'internally driven', as opposed to seeking external rewards.  Csíkszentmihályi says "An autotelic person needs few material possessions and little entertainment, comfort, power, or fame because so much of what he or she does is already rewarding."  Anyway, back to the Wikipedia article:

To achieve a flow state, a balance must be struck between the challenge of the task and the skill of the performer. If the task is too easy or too difficult, flow cannot occur. Both skill level and challenge level must be matched and high; if skill and challenge are low and matched, then apathy results.

But in this chart, 'apathy' is just one of 8 options, the one diametrically opposite to 'flow'.  I like the idea of how 'relaxation' is somewhere between flow and boredom, but I'm not sure it feels next to 'control'. 

It's all very thought-provoking.  We have these different modes, or moods, and we bounce between them without very much thought about what they're for and what's the overall structure of the space of these moods.

Moods seem like the opposite of mathematics and logic, but there's probably a science of moods which we haven't fully understood yet - in part because when we're in a mood, it dominates us and prevents us from thinking about it analytically.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mihaly_Csikszentmihalyi
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Replacement Dials for Vintage Pocket Watches. Reproduction dials. Replica dials. Custom dials. Pocket watch dials. All of these can be found on this site.
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IF Magazine was a monthly science fiction magazine that was first published in 1952, and ran through 1974, before it was merged into its sister publication, Galaxy Science Fiction. Now, you can read the entire run online over on Internet Archive.
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Super attractive bad boys. Emotionally unavailable girls with a scarred past. An overload of angst. Love triangles. Jealousy. “My life sucks” mentality. Sound familiar? Yep. I just described the bulk of YA characters. In ...
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Mr. Tower's spherical steam engine

In the 1800s there was an intense exploration of different designs for steam engines.  One of the most unusual is this spherical steam engine designed by a fellow named Beauchamp Tower.    It got a lot of publicity around 1885.   It was actually used for generating electricity to light carriages on the locomotives of the Great Eastern Railway in Britain!   It was also used on some ships.

 But it needed a lot of steam for the power it produced - perhaps due to leaks - so it never really caught on.

I got this picture, made by Bill Todd, from Douglas Self's wonderfu online museum of old technologies.  He writes:

The operation of the engine is not easy to comprehend, but goes something like this: The "cylinder" is spherical, and contains two quarter-spheres, with a thin circular disc between them. The two quarter-spheres rotate and engage rather like a universal joint, creating four cavities in the sphere, two of which are expanding and two contracting at any moment. By suitably timing admission and exhaust, rotational power is generated.

For much more, see:

http://www.douglas-self.com/MUSEUM/POWER/tower/tower.htm

Beauchamp Tower's main claim to fame was not this engine, but his discovery of full-film lubrication: with a suitable flow of oil, the surfaces of ball bearings will never actually touch, and they won't wear down.  He also invented a slide rule that uses metallic tapes that wind from one roller to another. 

A true steampunk!  The energy and crazy cleverness that goes into computer technology today, went into mechanical devices back then.

#steampunk  
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Flow

I've been staying at home for the last two days writing a paper about information and entropy in biological systems.  My wife is away, and I'm trying to keep distractions to a bare minimum, trying to get into that state where I'm completely absorbed, there's always something to do, and it's lots of fun.  That's what I love about writing.  At first I feel stuck, frustrated.  But gradually the ideas start falling into place - and once they do, I don't want to be anywhere else!  

This state is called flow, and it's great.  But life can't be all flow, it seems.

I like this chart.  I like any chart that takes psychology and maps it down to a few axes in a reasonably plausible way.  I don't have to 'believe in it' to enjoy a neat picture that pretends to tame the wild mess of the soul. 

Apparently this chart goes back to Mihaly Csikszentmihaly's theory of 'flow'.  According to Wikipedia:

In his seminal work, Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience, Csíkszentmihályi outlines his theory that people are happiest when they are in a state of flow— a state of concentration or complete absorption with the activity at hand and the situation. It is a state in which people are so involved in an activity that nothing else seems to matter.  The idea of flow is identical to the feeling of being in the zone or in the groove. The flow state is an optimal state of intrinsic motivation, where the person is fully immersed in what he is doing. This is a feeling everyone has at times, characterized by a feeling of great absorption, engagement, fulfillment, and skill—and during which temporal concerns (time, food, ego-self, etc.) are typically ignored.

In an interview with Wired magazine, Csíkszentmihályi described flow as "being completely involved in an activity for its own sake. The ego falls away. Time flies. Every action, movement, and thought follows inevitably from the previous one, like playing jazz. Your whole being is involved, and you're using your skills to the utmost."

Csikszentmihályi characterized nine component states of achieving flow including “challenge-skill balance, merging of action and awareness, clarity of goals, immediate and unambiguous feedback, concentration on the task at hand, paradox of control, transformation of time, loss of self-consciousness, and autotelic experience.”

What does autotelic mean?  It seems to mean 'internally driven', as opposed to seeking external rewards.  Csíkszentmihályi says "An autotelic person needs few material possessions and little entertainment, comfort, power, or fame because so much of what he or she does is already rewarding."  Anyway, back to the Wikipedia article:

To achieve a flow state, a balance must be struck between the challenge of the task and the skill of the performer. If the task is too easy or too difficult, flow cannot occur. Both skill level and challenge level must be matched and high; if skill and challenge are low and matched, then apathy results.

But in this chart, 'apathy' is just one of 8 options, the one diametrically opposite to 'flow'.  I like the idea of how 'relaxation' is somewhere between flow and boredom, but I'm not sure it feels next to 'control'. 

It's all very thought-provoking.  We have these different modes, or moods, and we bounce between them without very much thought about what they're for and what's the overall structure of the space of these moods.

Moods seem like the opposite of mathematics and logic, but there's probably a science of moods which we haven't fully understood yet - in part because when we're in a mood, it dominates us and prevents us from thinking about it analytically.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mihaly_Csikszentmihalyi
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Can I Wear My Santa Outfit Yet?
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Work
Occupation
Web Developer
Employment
  • ROBLOX Corporation
    Sr. Web Developer, 2914 - present
  • Yahoo! - javascript , gaming, and storytelling fan
    webdev, 2014
  • Ohai
    Web Developer, 2011
  • ebay, raptr, yahoo, netscape, ohai
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
California
Previously
Murray, KY
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Story
Tagline
Web developer. Indie RPG fan. YUI Evangelist. Web game builder. Javascript coder.
Introduction
Javascript developer. RPG fan.
Education
  • Murray State University
    Psychology
  • Indiana University
    Comp Sci
Basic Information
Gender
Male