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Andrew Stephen
Lived in Dunedin, New Zealand
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A great machine we've never seen :)
 
The Gamma was a machine designed by Microbee Systems Ltd in Australia between 1985 & 1987.  It was an advanced machine based on the Motorola MC68000 and was designed for true multitasking with a full memory management unit built in.
The machine was Microbee's equivalent to the Apple Mac, Atari 520ST and the Commodore Amiga.
Unfortunately, only 20 were ever built.
Along with the 68000 (running at 8Mhz) there were 2 Z80's - one to run CP/M-80 & provide some backwards compatibility with older models, and the other to handle DMA & other programmed special functions.
The Screen display had one of the highest resolutions available (720 x 350 pix )at that time, with full 16 colour (out of a palette of 4096) bit plane graphics. 
It had 8 bit mono sound with hardware FIFO, 2 SCC channels for serial comms & networking, Parallel I/O & mouse port.
It was also designed with an expansion buss that would accept a 80186 Processor card for PC-DOS operation.

Microbee Technology Pty Ltd. 
The Home of the Famous Australian Microbee Computer.
www.microbeetechnology.com.au
www.facebook.com/MicrobeeTechnology

#Microbee   #RetroComputing   #VintageComputing  #MC68000 #z80  
http://youtu.be/Hhbg42omvow
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Quick Visual Recap of Day 2 at the Vintage Computer Festival East 9.1 (Part 2 of 2)
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Interesting stats. As a long time Android user I'd somehow gained the impression that iOS was more reliable. Apparently not so.
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My Nexus 5 is probably the most stable smart phone I have ever had!
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Marion Stokes Macintosh Collection in a Rhode Island storage locker Are you a Mac collector? An Apple investor? Do you like to buy old computers still new
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This is my limited edition Jet Set Willy cassette inlay reprint, signed by Matthew Smith. I'll be off to get this framed sometime soon :)
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Quick Visual Recap of Day 2 at the Vintage Computer Festival East 9.1 (Part 1 of 2)
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Does this mean the KiwiCon sheep are safe? +Chris Russell
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I missed this back in 2005. What an amazing achievement.
 
This week: a PET 2001 emulator in obfuscated C takes the shape of a PET, incorporates a 6502 emulation and all in just 66 lines.  Stephen Sykes won the 2005 IOCCC with this entry. He includes a 6502 test suite, a chess program and a Basic demo.  See this album of screenshots for details.

As is usual with obfuscated C contest entries, even a source code formatter does not help to understand it. Processing it with the preprocessor and re-formatting converts it into something that starts making sense. Keyboard input is written to $a2 into memory instead of being passed through a VIA emulation. The LOAD vector on $ffd5 is trapped to load files. The CPU emulation, however, is still ... ungrokable. Awesome piece of code - although I would not want to maintain it :)

For all the files, see http://www.ioccc.org/2005/sykes/
For more PET facts, see the FAQ at http://zimmers.net/cbmpics/cbm/PETx/petfaq.html or the index at http://www.6502.org/users/andre/petindex/index.html
For the memory map, see http://zimmers.net/cbmpics/cbm/PETx/petmem.txt
The chess program is (probably) a conversion of a previous IOCCC entry - see http://www.stephensykes.com/IOCCC/doodoo.c
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In their circles
765 people
Have them in circles
674 people
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Work
Occupation
Vintage Computing, Information Security and Occasional Public Speaker
Basic Information
Other names
lizardb0y
Story
Tagline
Collector of Classic Computers, Purveyor of Prattle and Unrepentant Alliterator.
Introduction
I like old computers.  Not the "My-dad-has-an-old-Pentium-he-doesn't-use-anymore" old but more of an "Oh-my-goodness-I-haven't-seen-one-of-those-since-I-was-a-kid" kind of old.

The earliest commercially sold home computer was released in 1971*, the same year as the first microprocessor. Over the next two decades the personal computer industry grew, flourished and withered leaving the bland, undifferentiated market we have today.

My self-assigned mission is to preserve as much of the computers and culture of this era as I reasonably can, with the ultimate goal of exhibiting these in some public forum.

* Actually, the first home computer is a matter of regular and heated debate.  I picked the Kenback-1 in 1971 because a lot of good things happened in 1971.

My interests are:
- Vintage computers and computing history (Specialist topic "The Personal Computer Revolution")
- GNU/Linux, Free and Open source software - with a more recent interest in these on non-Intel architectures, particularly ARM (Specialist Topic: "How cool it was to have an almost entirely open source smartphone, and why it was doomed not to be")
- Info Sec (Specialist topic: "Damn we're all bad at security and risk decisions, and some humble suggestions that might help")
Motorcycles (Specialist topic: "What a drama it was owning an Italian motorcycle, what a relief it was to get rid of it, and why I got another one 5 years later anyway."
Bragging rights
One bike, two kids and over 180 vintage computer and games consoles.
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Previously
Dunedin, New Zealand - Wellington, New Zealand