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Andrew Hunter
Works at Google
Attended University of Washington
Lives in Seattle, WA
1,186 followers|877,021 views
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Andrew Hunter

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SWPL kashrut.
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Andrew Hunter

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Weight cuts are insane.
What It Feels Like is a new SI.com series featuring first-person stories directly from athletes across all sports. Long before Ronda Rousey took over the sport's spotlight, MMA fighter Julie Kedzie...
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Andrew Hunter

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http://nostalgebraist.tumblr.com/post/119363616494/thathopeyetlives-extracting-actually-useful

However, there is a situation where I find the word and its negative connotations very useful, and that’s when people take the step from “I am hurting” to “it is your responsibility to alleviate my pain.”

What? No.  It's absolutely my responsibility to alleviate your pain. Everyone's pain.  Every time I don't do so I have failed in my duty as a moral being.  Not knowing is no excuse either; just because I did not hear the cry of a sparrow does not mean it did not fall, and blocking out the sound of your pain is the least moral way to avoid fixing it.

This sounds unreasonable, I know.  But this is why I like to talk so much in my moral philosophy about the differences between failing or being flawed and being, well, a bad person.  I wrote a post about this a while ago [1] but the key point is that so much of modern society seems to operate on the syllogism

- I am/do/have X
- if X were a bad thing, that'd mean I was evil.
- Therefore X can't be bad!

This bothers me.  We need to be able to accept that we are flawed, that we are--for lack of a better word--sinners, but that doesn't mean we're worthless.  That we can try, and fail, but still keep trying, and still be OK with our moral actions.  Maybe not satisfied--maybe never fully satisfied--but not utter failures either.

Your pain is my problem.  I don't, I can't, always manage to fix it.  I make no apologies for being limited or needing to spend resources on my own sanity or, honestly, enjoyment. I am not perfect.

But I am trying to get better.  And the first step is acknowledging that while I'm not God, I sure as hell would like to be.

[1] https://plus.google.com/+AndrewHunter/posts/1X7CisCEWwJ
nostalgebraist: “thathopeyetlives: “Extracting actually useful ideas from “entitlement”, which is a horrible concept used to beat people who are having a shitty time into the ground. 1. The tendency...
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Well, this hits my buttons.
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+Andrew Hunter Glad you like it Andrew! Check out "Incantation' too if you haven't already. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YftAYq1AHiE
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Graduations are like the end zone. Act like you've been there before.
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I'm not sure which of this I disagree with more: the idea that you shouldn't celebrate a once in a lifetime event, or that you shouldn't celebrate touchdowns.
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http://foxtrotalpha.jalopnik.com/broken-booms-why-is-it-so-hard-to-develop-procure-a-1698725648

TL;DR we've spent billions and decades to not get a tanker that isn't better than one we procured in 3 years sixty years ago.  

God we're societally incompetent.
I was catching up on the KC-46 Pegasus program when I read this story and this story, among others, discussing further delays and issues with the USAF’s long awaited new tanker. All this reminded me of a question I have asked for so long: Why has it become so hard for the USAF to develop and procure a new tanker?
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Andrew Hunter

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SWPL kashrut.
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http://www.vox.com/2015/5/21/8637281/gyllenhaal-hollywood-discrimination

Something is weird here.  Not the behavior of Hollywood, that's perfectly well understood.

Why is Denzel Washington not aging at 1 year per year?
Discrimination against older female actors in Hollywood isn't going away any time soon.
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The news.discovery.com graph linked above does a better job; age of Denzel makes sense as a line, but there's no continuity between his partners; they should just be points. 
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https://medium.com/starts-with-a-bang/astroquizzical-what-happens-to-light-when-it-hits-the-sun-b55f68b46710

What happens is that all the newly formed light from the core hits the inner layer of the radiation zone and is absorbed. This zone is opaque to light, so it’s constantly being absorbed and then spat back out by the atoms in the radiation zone. However, this process doesn’t just go “out” towards the surface of the sun, it goes in any and all directions, so the photons of light wind up going in what’s called a ‘random walk’. A random walk is a series of steps in a random direction. They might take you in a certain direction for a while, then reverse course, then reverse again, then go in a circle, and then out of the radiation zone. (You might even head back into the core, having to start all over again at the beginning of the radiation zone.) Typically, given the size of the radiation zone, and the number of atoms around to absorb a photon of light, it takes several hundred thousand years for any given photon to escape this part of the sun.

You know, I hear this claim a lot, but I don't like it. I don't think any particular photon ever makes it through the radiation zone from the core. Each interaction presumably involves the photon being absorbed by a electron which moves to a higher orbital [1]. Later, that electron decays, emitting a photon, which moves onward...but it ain't the same photon in any meaningful sense.  

I mean, one can track a (Markov chain of) causal interactions starting at the core and ending outside the radiation zone, with a mean time of 100K years or what have you, but it's not one photon moving, dammit!

[1] there's presumably some cross-section for photon/nucleus interactions? But I don't know what they would look like and I expect it's much smaller.
The Sun absorbs all the light that hits it. How long is it trapped?
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If you buy the theory that energy and information have some sort of equivalence, you could view the photon as simply a packet of information. In that sense the same packet of information is preserved through the causal chain of reactions that lead it from the core to the outside. The information contained in the packet is never modified, it just gets moved from place to place and shifts from one form to another.

I'd agree it's philosophically questionable to say, "It takes a single photon several hundred thousand years to escape the core." However I think it is a fairly reasonable way of expressing in relatively layman terms the more complex concept, "If you release a photon with a unique quantum of energy in the center of the core, it will take several hundred thousand years before you detect a photon with the same quantum of energy being emitted from the edge of the core."
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 Again some weight is lost as work, and again this is greatly big when set beside the work gotten from a minglingish doing such as fire.
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They also clean the mess and file reports.
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Have him in circles
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Work
Occupation
Engineer
Employment
  • Google
    2009 - present
  • Aerospace
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Seattle, WA
Previously
San Francisco, CA - Florence, MA - Claremont, CA - Bristol, England - San Francisco, CA - Mountain View, CA - Florence, MA
Story
Tagline
It seemed like a good idea at the time.
Introduction
wannabe mathematician, reluctant software engineer, enthusiastic hunter-gatherer, young enough to know worse.
Education
  • University of Washington
    2009 - 2011
  • Harvey Mudd College
    2005 - 2009
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Male
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Slowest Chipotle I have ever seen.
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Great selection of meats, like twenty choices for sides. Friendly service. Four sauces, all good, all different. Sides of excellent quality (if perhaps overpriced.)
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