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Andrew Hunter
Works at Google
Attended University of Washington
Lives in Seattle, WA
1,189 followers|882,107 views
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Andrew Hunter

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I love my wife far more today than I did on the day we met. Looking back, there were a number of qualities about her that helped that affection grow:

She had a great personality. She looks me in the eye and talked about interesting topics. She cared about me and my needs. She laughed and smiled far more often than she whined and cried. She didn’t call and wake me up at 1 am. And 3 am. And 5 am. She didn’t shit herself over and over again.

http://baugues.com/bonding
Delayed Bonding There’s an expectation that when your baby is born, the sun will shine, the angels will sing, and you will realize that you& …
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Andrew Hunter

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http://onpasture.com/2015/01/05/why-dont-we-drink-pig-milk/

I have wondered about this question for a long time.  I never actually considered sending a letter to the Pig Council.  In hindsight, I don't know why I didn't!
And why don't we eat pork milk cheese, yogurt or butter?  Here's the question AND the answer. :-)   Want to read more fun letters from Guy Petzall? Here you go!
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Nope.
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Andrew Hunter

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http://rationalconspiracy.com/2015/05/25/new-york-times-makes-up-facts-about-sf-housing/

But the NYT wants people to think rent-controlled apartments are being “rapidly replaced” for new development, so that’s what they’ll print, even though this has never once actually happened.

The media is not to be trusted, news at 11.  Oh, shit, that doesn't work here.
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Murray Gell-Mann Amnesia, bro.  If the Times is consistently either wrong and misinformed at best or actively making up lies at worst in every article about something I understand enough to check their work, one should assume that the ones I can't check are equally wrong.
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Andrew Hunter

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SWPL kashrut.
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I strongly doubt that cast aluminum scoops or silica glass jars can be described as "organic" in any sense of the word.
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Andrew Hunter

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Weight cuts are insane.
What It Feels Like is a new SI.com series featuring first-person stories directly from athletes across all sports. Long before Ronda Rousey took over the sport's spotlight, MMA fighter Julie Kedzie...
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Andrew Hunter

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http://nostalgebraist.tumblr.com/post/119363616494/thathopeyetlives-extracting-actually-useful

However, there is a situation where I find the word and its negative connotations very useful, and that’s when people take the step from “I am hurting” to “it is your responsibility to alleviate my pain.”

What? No.  It's absolutely my responsibility to alleviate your pain. Everyone's pain.  Every time I don't do so I have failed in my duty as a moral being.  Not knowing is no excuse either; just because I did not hear the cry of a sparrow does not mean it did not fall, and blocking out the sound of your pain is the least moral way to avoid fixing it.

This sounds unreasonable, I know.  But this is why I like to talk so much in my moral philosophy about the differences between failing or being flawed and being, well, a bad person.  I wrote a post about this a while ago [1] but the key point is that so much of modern society seems to operate on the syllogism

- I am/do/have X
- if X were a bad thing, that'd mean I was evil.
- Therefore X can't be bad!

This bothers me.  We need to be able to accept that we are flawed, that we are--for lack of a better word--sinners, but that doesn't mean we're worthless.  That we can try, and fail, but still keep trying, and still be OK with our moral actions.  Maybe not satisfied--maybe never fully satisfied--but not utter failures either.

Your pain is my problem.  I don't, I can't, always manage to fix it.  I make no apologies for being limited or needing to spend resources on my own sanity or, honestly, enjoyment. I am not perfect.

But I am trying to get better.  And the first step is acknowledging that while I'm not God, I sure as hell would like to be.

[1] https://plus.google.com/+AndrewHunter/posts/1X7CisCEWwJ
nostalgebraist: “thathopeyetlives: “Extracting actually useful ideas from “entitlement”, which is a horrible concept used to beat people who are having a shitty time into the ground. 1. The tendency...
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Andrew Hunter

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http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/13/sports/ncaafootball/13tech.html?_r=0

When the NYT isn't lying about housing in SF or sneering at nerd's food choices, it's demonstrating that it knows less about fluid dynamics than a starting center for a Div I football team:

An article on Nov. 13 about Sean Bedford, the Georgia Tech offensive lineman who is also an aerospace engineering major, misstated the terms that David Scarborough, a senior research engineer, used in teaching the jet and rocket propulsion class. The terms were “isentropic flow,” “stagnation states” and “adiabatic efficiency for the diffuser” — not “isotropic stagnation state” and “idiomatic deficiency for diffuser.”
Sean Bedford knows better than most that football is not rocket science. He is the starting center for No. 7 Georgia Tech, as well as an Aerospace Engineering major.
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I'm glad I'm not the only one that thought the Soylent article had an unnecessarily nasty tone. 
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Andrew Hunter

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Suppose we have a finite group G and a normal subgroup N.  Under what conditions can we rely on G having another (not necessarily normal) subgroup H \iso G/N?

Or an equivalent formulation that explains why we'd care: N partitions G into cosets, and if we pick coset representatives u_1,...,u_r, then G/N is the group {u_1N,...,U_rN} with group operation being cartesian product of sets, and normality of N guarantees the property that we need: that u_iNu_jN = u_iu_jN as sets.  BUT: can we pick coset representatives so that u_iu_j = u_r for some actual representative?  Arbitrary representatives only tell us that u_iu_j falls into the "right" coset, not that it hits our representative for this coset.

Certainly this can be true. Z/30Z has a normal subgroup Z/10Z, and (Z/30Z)/(Z/10Z) is isomorphic to Z/3Z.  But what's more, the elements of Z/30Z = 0, 10, 20 actually form a subgroup isomorphic to Z/30Z, and in fact are the unique choices such that this is true.  (0, 1, and 2, for example, are proper coset representatives, but 1 + 2 = 3; 3 is certainly in the coset of 0 but isn't actually zero.) Similarly, S_5 has a normal subgroup A_5, and the identity & (1 2) are the "right" representatives, whereas (say) (1 2) (3 4) & (1 5 3) certainly work as cosets of A_5 but don't form a group.

I haven't been able to construct a finite example where there are no such good choices, but I haven't been able to prove they always exist. I know of infinite groups where this doesn't work (no coset representatives of 3Z in Z form a group--in fact, Z has no (nontrivial) finite subgroups.)  Is this a well-known thing whose name I don't know?  Are there known necessary & sufficient conditions for it?
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Sadly I can't find an easy way to answer the Q: given a N, how do I tell if there exists an H that makes it a semidirect product?
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Andrew Hunter

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http://newramblerreview.com/book-reviews/law/ethics-on-the-run

Quite understandably, the Ethics Code of the American Sociological Association does not directly address the possibility of attempted murder...Medical students are taught to do no harm.  Law students are instructed that they may not assist a client in the commission of a crime.  The analog for ethnography students ought to be equally straightforward: if a subject asks you for help in a murder plot, just say no.

The final story is impressive...except that the rest of the review points out damning evidence towards its accuracy. Ironically, though, Goffman is in trouble either way: either she perpetrated a fraud on her readers, on academic understanding, and on society...or an attempted murder.
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I've not heard of this before. That was a brutal introduction. :o
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Andrew Hunter

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I am uncertain how to balance sangria.  Between wine, fruit, liquor, sugar, and (soda) water, one has several degrees of freedom with which to control alcohol, sweetness, and acid, and I don't know how to compute an optimum.
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Sounds like you don't just want an optimum, but a principled and defensible method of arriving at an answer.
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Andrew Hunter

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SWPL kashrut.
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http://www.vox.com/2015/5/21/8637281/gyllenhaal-hollywood-discrimination

Something is weird here.  Not the behavior of Hollywood, that's perfectly well understood.

Why is Denzel Washington not aging at 1 year per year?
Discrimination against older female actors in Hollywood isn't going away any time soon.
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The news.discovery.com graph linked above does a better job; age of Denzel makes sense as a line, but there's no continuity between his partners; they should just be points. 
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People
In his circles
85 people
Have him in circles
1,189 people
Robert Rambusch's profile photo
‫المسرح القبطي روسيلا  و  مارسلينو‬‎'s profile photo
Jason Trotter's profile photo
Phu Thien's profile photo
Sneha Popley's profile photo
veridiana moura's profile photo
Moath Obeidat's profile photo
Radim Polak's profile photo
Arun Roy's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Engineer
Employment
  • Google
    2009 - present
  • Aerospace
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Seattle, WA
Previously
San Francisco, CA - Florence, MA - Claremont, CA - Bristol, England - San Francisco, CA - Mountain View, CA - Florence, MA
Story
Tagline
It seemed like a good idea at the time.
Introduction
wannabe mathematician, reluctant software engineer, enthusiastic hunter-gatherer, young enough to know worse.
Education
  • University of Washington
    2009 - 2011
  • Harvey Mudd College
    2005 - 2009
Basic Information
Gender
Male
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Food: GoodDecor: Very GoodService: Poor - Fair
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Slowest Chipotle I have ever seen.
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Great selection of meats, like twenty choices for sides. Friendly service. Four sauces, all good, all different. Sides of excellent quality (if perhaps overpriced.)
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