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Andrew Alden
Attended University of New Hampshire
Lives in Oakland CA
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Andrew Alden

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This week on KQED Science, I talk about how paleontologists have established that the Capitanian mass extinction was global and should be added to the "Big Five."
A new study of fossils on an island in the Arctic Ocean show a major episode of extinction that qualifies as a new "great dying."
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Very interesting. My last name is Alden too.
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Me weekly post for KQED Science: Keep a weather eye on the sea and it might save your life.
Tsunamis are a worldwide menace with specific local threats. It pays to learn your local situation and keep the knowledge fresh in your community.
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Homes on 75th Avenue, East Oakland
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Art-filled yard with cat, Hillmont Avenue, East Oakland
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I couldn't quite say it out loud when I wrote this post, but here's a really scary study.
Our best climate models, combined with our best climate records, foresee at least a century of profound drought in the Midwest and Southwest.
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Time to start praying to the rain spirits
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For many purposes, listening to the Earth works as well as banging on it.
The background noise of the deep Earth resembles the random behavior of the sea surface. But advanced techniques can extract robust data from these whispers of information and help save marine life.
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Andrew Alden

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I speculate for KQED Science: a repeat of this catastrophe would hurt just as bad, and we'd see it coming better, perhaps for an extra degree of horror.
Tambora brought the world a taste of apocalypse 200 years ago. Today we have better tools to monitor volcanoes like it, but the next eruption of its size will still challenge civilization.
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Spring at the old Hotel Mine quarry, East Oakland
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+Jerome Rainey By jove I do believe you're right.
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I am pretty sure that the hillside in this photo is NOT a landside, but two others in this post definitely are.
I've been surveying the low hill between Mills College and Holy Redeemer College, home of the Millsmont neighborhood and its eastern continuation, which for the moment I'll call upper Eastmont. Its...
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My weekly KQED Science post: Let's open up our data and harness it to control induced earthquakes, says a key USGS panel.
Scientists must play catch-up to industry as we figure out ways to use the deep underground without triggering earthquakes.
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LA CIENCIA DEBE SERVIR PARA VENEFICIO DE LA SOCIEDAD Y QUE BUENO QUE AYA PERSONAS QUE SE DEDICAN A AYUDAR QUE DIOS LE VENDIGA.
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Chimes Creek is a microcosm of what humans have done to Oakland's oaky lands.
Chimes Creek is the second of the three streams in Mills College. It is said to get its name in reference to the college's church bells. The sound would have traveled up the creek bed to the meadow...
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Some of our best rocks aren't in the ground.
Oakland's rocks aren't all in the ground. They're in our yards and homes, too. Here are a few presented in the order I found them lately. There's a house on 60th Avenue that stopped me in my tracks...
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8,197 people
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Work
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write, walk, photo, geologize
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Oakland CA
Previously
Newmarket NH - Pleasantville NY - Kensington MD - Palo Alto CA - Concord CA
Story
Tagline
Writer on geological subjects: KQED, blogs, books & whaddayagot?
Bragging rights
World's leading expert on Oakland sidewalk stamps
Education
  • University of New Hampshire
    Earth Science
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Male
Andrew Alden's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
Fossil Study Detects Another Mass Extinction in the Deep Past
blogs.kqed.org

A new study of fossils on an island in the Arctic Ocean show a major episode of extinction that qualifies as a new "great dying."

The Great 1815 Tambora Eruption: What if This Volcano Blew Today?
blogs.kqed.org

Tambora brought the world a taste of apocalypse 200 years ago. Today we have better tools to monitor volcanoes like it, but the next eruptio

Tsunami Preparedness Week: Building a Network of Awareness
blogs.kqed.org

Tsunamis are a worldwide menace with specific local threats. It pays to learn your local situation and keep the knowledge fresh in your comm

Experts Recommend How to Deal With Artificial Earthquakes
blogs.kqed.org

Scientists must play catch-up to industry as we figure out ways to use the deep underground without triggering earthquakes.

New Study: Global Warming Will Bring Megadroughts to the West
blogs.kqed.org

Our best climate models, combined with our best climate records, foresee at least a century of profound drought in the Midwest and Southwest

Scientists Tune in to the Earth’s Ambient Hum
blogs.kqed.org

The background noise of the deep Earth resembles the random behavior of the sea surface. But advanced techniques can extract robust data fro

The Supposedly Dry Little World of the Asteroid Vesta Reveals Signs of W...
blogs.kqed.org

The large asteroid Vesta has added flows of material rich in water to its bag of tricks. It's just one more way this small world acts like a

When Finding Faults, Geologists Must Sometimes Become Ditch-Diggers
blogs.kqed.org

For geologists, even with the advent of modern technology, there are instances when older methods are more effective; picks and shovels are

New Climate Research Suggests Acceleration of Sea Level Rise
blogs.kqed.org

A reassessment of historical data suggests that compared to previous estimates, the world's sea level rose more slowly during the 20th centu

New Soil Erosion Study May Help Sustainable Farming Practices
blogs.kqed.org

A new way of measuring soil erosion in the geologically recent past, before modern civilization, may help put sustainable agriculture on a f

Dinosaur Extinction: New Research Favors Volcanism as Cause
blogs.kqed.org

A new set of rock dates have pushed volcanism back into the debate over the extinction of the dinosaurs.

Earth’s Most Common Mineral Is Bagged and Tagged: Meet Bridgmanite
blogs.kqed.org

Thanks to a meteorite collected in 1879, we have finally given a name to the most abundant mineral in Earth. Here's why it took so long to c

Changes in Earth’s Magnetic Field Leads to Renamed Oakland Airport Runways
blogs.kqed.org

A geological change of glacial speed finally made itself felt in a way the civil authorities had to acknowledge.

Four Bay Area Cities Selected as Future Models of Resilience
blogs.kqed.org

A $100 million effort to push the world's cities toward better disaster resistance is making a test case with a "gang of four" Resilient Cit

24 Years Later, The Legacy of Loma Prieta Lives On
blogs.kqed.org

Nature shows almost no signs of the Loma Prieta earthquake 24 years later. But the human landscape still carries scars that should remind us

The Science of California’s Seismic Pests, or Earthquake “Swarms”
blogs.kqed.org

Scientists are creeping their way toward better understanding of earthquake swarms, those annoying and sometimes damaging seismic pests we g

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Pakistan’s New Earthquake Island: Can It Happen Here?
blogs.kqed.org

The rise of a small, fuming island after a large distant quake may not be such an exotic event. Look for one when the next Big One strikes C

Blue Oaks Shine New Light on California’s Past Climate
blogs.kqed.org

A new climate chronology for California has come from one of our quintessential trees, the blue oak.

Ironstone
geology.about.com

Several types of sedimentary rocks are called ironstone. Page 16.