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Andrew Alden
Attended University of New Hampshire
Lives in Oakland CA
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Andrew Alden

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I wrote this up because it reminded me of my own geological adage, "leave the stone alone." Scientists have the privilege of molesting rare things in the name of science, and they should show the rest of us respect. You hear that, paleomagnetic sample drillers?
 
Biology Paradox: Killing and Collecting Rare Creatures to Prove They’re Not Extinct

A group of biologists asks their peers to start documenting newly discovered and "rediscovered" species by non-destructive techniques instead of killing a specimen to bring home.

Learn more from +Andrew Alden at KQED Science. 
Link to study summary: http://goo.gl/lNKu2h
A group of biologists asks their peers to start documenting newly discovered and "rediscovered" species by non-destructive techniques instead of killing a specimen to bring home.
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I know it's hard work holding one of those heavy portable drills and getting measurements right. I know it's hard to take the extra measure of care. I know lots of workers do their best. But those conspicuous holes last for centuries, unless the crew plugs them afterward.
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The new paper on the great extinction made me think, irresistibly, of dinner-theater murder mysteries, so I went with it.
 
Study Reveals New Suspect in the "Great Dying" Mass Exinction Murder Mystery

The latest microbial hypothesis published in a recent paper addresses the ongoing drama of the "Great Dying", a monstrously deadly event that occurred about 250 million years ago and drove some 90 percent of the world's species to extinction.

Learn more from geologist +Andrew Alden at KQED Science.

Link to paper: http://goo.gl/Cxo4ki
The latest microbial hypothesis published in a recent paper addresses the ongoing drama of the "Great Dying", a monstrously deadly event that occurred about 250 million years ago and drove some 90 percent of the world's species to extinction.
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Boomer geologists, what was your experience of the Good Friday quake?
 
50 Years Ago, Alaskan Earthquake Was Key Event for Earth Science

"Among many geologists of the boomer generation, the Alaska earthquake of March 27, 1964 is a touchstone of our formative years. Black-and-white images of ruin and upheaval from the then-new state of Alaska burst into our consciousness. News reached us of deadly “tidal waves” washing down the West Coast. But beyond rocking us kids toward geological careers, that earthquake was a key event in the 1960s revolution in earth science."

Learn more from geologist +Andrew Alden at KQED Science.
50 years ago today, the Good Friday earthquake in Alaska sent shockwaves through earth science itself.
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I actually have only vague memories of the quake, probably from what I read in the Portsmouth (NH) Herald. We weren't a TV-news watching family. But I've spoken with others for whom the quake left quite an impression.
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Once you become familiar with Oakland's skyline, it’s never boring.
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Home is the sailor, home from the sea

(Mountain View Cemetery)
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I enjoyed researching this, but writing it was a pain after my graphics card failed and I had to scramble. Nothing can keep me from my appointed rounds!
 
New Stanford Study Examines Geologic Impact of a Massive Asteroid Collision on Ancient Earth

A new paper from +Stanford University scientists attempts to describe a realistic picture of the unimaginable: a colossal cosmic impact that left a crater 500 kilometers across on the ancient Earth.

Learn more from +Andrew Alden at KQED Science. 
A new paper attempts to describe a realistic picture of the unimaginable: a colossal cosmic impact that left a crater 500 kilometers across on the ancient Earth.
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Local stone walls: humble highlights of Oakland geology. You can't get 'em any more.
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A humble highlight of domestic Oakland geology.
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I can't stop seeing the land's ongoing decay: the geologist's curse.
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I'm gradually returning to action after my dad's death last month. This is a story that caught my eye last month; I wanted to give readers a bit of the flavor of this kind of research. Also, my sister gave me a DVD of old family letters and I thought, "I wonder if there are any earthquake reports in these letters?"
 
Digging Up New Information on Old Earthquakes in the Santa Cruz Mountains

New research has mapped 19th-century earthquake ruptures along the San Andreas Fault in a study that combines geologic and human records - learn more from geologist +Andrew Alden at KQED Science: http://goo.gl/o8rNuJ
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In his circles
217 people
Have him in circles
7,946 people
Work
Occupation
write, walk, photo, geologize
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Oakland CA
Previously
Newmarket NH - Pleasantville NY - Kensington MD - Palo Alto CA - Concord CA
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Writer on geological subjects: About.com, KQED, blogs & whaddayagot?
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World's leading expert on Oakland sidewalk stamps
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  • University of New Hampshire
    Earth Science
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Andrew Alden's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
Changes in Earth’s Magnetic Field Leads to Renamed Oakland Airport Runways
blogs.kqed.org

A geological change of glacial speed finally made itself felt in a way the civil authorities had to acknowledge.

Four Bay Area Cities Selected as Future Models of Resilience
blogs.kqed.org

A $100 million effort to push the world's cities toward better disaster resistance is making a test case with a "gang of four" Resilient Cit

24 Years Later, The Legacy of Loma Prieta Lives On
blogs.kqed.org

Nature shows almost no signs of the Loma Prieta earthquake 24 years later. But the human landscape still carries scars that should remind us

The Science of California’s Seismic Pests, or Earthquake “Swarms”
blogs.kqed.org

Scientists are creeping their way toward better understanding of earthquake swarms, those annoying and sometimes damaging seismic pests we g

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Don't have a Google Account? Create an account. Sign in to Google+. Sign in. Email. Password. Stay signed in. Can't access your account? © 2

Pakistan’s New Earthquake Island: Can It Happen Here?
blogs.kqed.org

The rise of a small, fuming island after a large distant quake may not be such an exotic event. Look for one when the next Big One strikes C

Blue Oaks Shine New Light on California’s Past Climate
blogs.kqed.org

A new climate chronology for California has come from one of our quintessential trees, the blue oak.

Ironstone
geology.about.com

Several types of sedimentary rocks are called ironstone. Page 16.

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