Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Andreas Proschofsky
Editor for DER STANDARD / derStandard.at with a focus on Linux, Android and Open Source in general
Editor for DER STANDARD / derStandard.at with a focus on Linux, Android and Open Source in general
About
Posts

Post has attachment
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
It's encouraging to see Google opening up AOSP development (a bit)
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Google has found another privacy relevant bug in the Google+ API and is going to accelerate the shutdown of its social network... Deadline is now April instead of August 2019. sigh
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Google breaking its own Play Store rules
This update leaves me puzzled. But not the way you might expect. Taking a closer look at the APK Allo 27 is targeted at API level 25. Which according to Google's rules for the Play Store is not allowed anymore. Since the beginning of November every update has to target API level 26 or higher. So this leaves the question: Did Google seriously allow one of its own apps to skip the rules that everyone else has to abide to?
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
As some of you might know: The Google Store has been blocking orders to package delivery services for a few weeks (in some cases: a few months) now. And this just got way more interesting a few days ago: Turns out this is actually illegal thanks to a new EU regulation against Geoblocking. The good news: After a long forth and back with me they have now decided to backtrack: Starting from today orders from the German Google Store to Logoix (and similar orders i other countries) should work fine again.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Google doing what it does best: Killing services. RIP Allo.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
.@MKBHD 's "Blind Smartphone Camera Test 2018" is such great fun to watch. I don't want to spoil it, so if you are into smartphone cameras and haven't seen it yet: Follow the link, watch it and then come back for your mandatory "WTF????" comment ;)
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
I really, really enjoy my Home Hubs so far. Besides the obvious reasons (the added use cases thanks to the display ;)) one thing really stands out for me: The visual feedback to voice commands. This might seem like a minor thing. But with the Home Hub you can see your commands being transcribed, which gives you a much better clue on what the device is actually doing. Often with the regular Homes (and Echos) you have this moment of uncertainty: Did it understand me? Is something broken? Which simply isn't the case here. So the display adds to the core usability - which is something that I didn't expect.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
If the sound of the Home Hub was better, I'd agree. But as long as that is not the case, I think the regular Home still has a place in Google's lineup. One that might evaporate soon though. (with new hardware generations for Home Mini/Home Hub). If I were Google I'd look at the current Home and think hard about which new roles it could fulfill. Like: Combining it with a next-gen Google Wifi. Or adding Zigbee support or other extra hardware.
There's 0 reason to get a regular Google Home anymore. The display makes it 1,000,000 times more useful, and the price difference when on sale ($100-150 depending on size) is 100% worth it.

I'd question Google Home Minis as well but they're so cheap, they still have a place.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
I know, this is already a few days old, but I just got around to read it. And I have to say: I really love such blog entries, wish more product teams at Google and also other companies would do similar technical deep dives.
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded