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Andreas Link
Dipl.-Inform. (FH) Andreas Link
Dipl.-Inform. (FH) Andreas Link
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Today I had some time to design "Flensburg". I tried several versions but always had some challenges with the resolution when scaling it to a lower resolution with Gimp :-/. Version 2 is not so sharp designed but looking nicest on my watch so far :-). Feel free to give your comment, here is Flensburg, Germany.
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2015-05-16
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Hej guys, just found this community and saw all these really nice additional little worlds. Very well done!! But I did not find any from Flensburg (Germany) :-). Probably my search just did not return the result, or noone did it :-). Maybe I just overlooked, so if someone has Flensburg, this would be really great to share.

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Hej, anbody seen this error? During the day, the Client just turned into error... is there a log to check for further details about this unknown error? I was able to fix it by just stopping the client and restart it again. But anyway, I never had this before, currently I'm running version 1.8.0, build 4847.
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Trying to buy an Ubuntu phone is more than sad with BG... as if this was not expected? Canonical is selling strong cloud services, but not having a strong shop partner, beeing able to handle all these requests? You could have done better!
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Trying to buy a phone is more than sad ... as if this was not expected. Canonical is selling strong cloud services, but not having a strong shop, beeing able to handle all these requests? You could have done better!
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Hej guys, a lot is goin' on here and I'm absolutely looking forward to buy an Ubuntu phone, as the price looks attractive so far, but I'm also wearing a Moto 360 Smartwatch on my wrist.
Are there any known facts, whether there is a chance to combine an Ubuntu-Phone with an Android Wear Smartwatch? Would be sad, if this could be a showstopper :-S. Any ideas/news?

Hej guys, a lot is goin' on here and I'm absolutly looking forward to buy an Ubuntu phone, as the price will be attractive so far, but I'm also wearing a Moto 360 Smartwatch on my wrist.
Are there any known facts, whether there is a chance to combine an Ubuntu-Phone and an Android Wear Smartwatch? Would be sad, if this could be a showstopper :-S. Any ideas/news?

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Hej guys, 
many people talk about "turn something on/off" with a RaspberryPi, but you can only very rarely find something useful about reading inputs from other systems. I needed a solution, where I'm able to read around 16 inputs which are coming from my house (lights on/off etc.). So I finally ended at the MCP23017, a very powerful I/O chip with I²C connection, this one is perfect for the RaspberryPi, so I designed a prototype as you can see on the pics.

A lot solutions in the web explain ways how to read a GPIO-pin of the RaspberryPi in a loop and if the state changes, trigger an event. But by using just e.g. the wiredPi lib, there are a lot more possibilities like interrupts. I used the lib to activate and react on interrupts on one pin in a short python script.

The whole idea behind my project is to read many inputs by just using - or let's say "blocking" - only one of my RaspberryPi GPIO pins. This is easily done by connecting a MCP23017 via I²C to the RaspberryPi GPIO header and connect one I/O-pin of the RPi to an interrupt pin of the MCP23017. Done. If one pin state changes (either of port A or port B) an interrupt is called, this triggers the Pi and the Pi just asks the state of the complete pin-set of the MCP23017 which I (currently) finally store in a database.

First I have designed a protoype that fits on an RaspberryPi Model B and - as the GPIO headers start with the same functionality - will also fit on a Model B+. It should also fit on a BananaPi, as far as I remember (but did not test yet). I installed my prototype in the electric control cabinet of my house and it works like a charm. So I decided to create a real board, where I do not have to solder so many wires. I designed it to be easily soldered and to be able to hook one on another. By using this technique you are able to connect up to 8 boards which gives you either 128 inputs or outputs or however you set them up (more are not possible, because there are only 8 different I²C addresses possible).

Currently I'm writing down all my steps and what to do and also a step-by-step guide, so that everyone is able to use a MCP23017 and interrupts on a RaspberryPi. If I'm done, I will post it here, if someone is interested in.

Update:
Project-Docu: http://raspberrypi.link-tech.de/doku.php?id=mcp23017

Interrupts-Docu: http://raspberrypi.link-tech.de/doku.php?id=interrupts
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RaspberryPi MCP23017 Board (Shared)
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Moin zusammen,
jeder will immer mit dem RaspberryPi nur etwas schalten, aber selten findet man Projekte oder Tutorials, wo auch mal jemand viele Inputs effektiv aus anderen Quellen auslesen möchte. Ich brauchte nun eine Lösung, wo ich nun 16 Eingänge von meinem Haus auslesen wollte, also in dem Fall 230V geschaltete Lampen, Türklingel etc. und hier bin ich dann beim MCP23017 gelandet, einem für den Zweck sehr mächtigen I/O chip, der bequem via I²C angesprochen werden kann. Damit war er perfekt für meinen RaspberryPi und somit habe ich einen Prototypen konstruiert, wie man auf den Fotos sehen kann.

Viele der bereits vorhandenen Lösungen im Web schreiben immer, wie man einen GPIO-Pin vom RaspberryPi in einem einfachen while-loop oder so permanent ausliest und bei einer Statusänderung eine Aktion ausführt. Davon halte ich aber nichts und bin mit den Einsatz der populären wiredPi Bibliothek auch zu der Möglichkeit gekommen, Eingänge über Interrupts in einem einfachen Python Script auszuwerten und entsprechend dann darauf zu reagieren, was ich für wesentlich effektiver halte.
Die Idee hinter meinem Projekt ist also viele I/Os auszulesen (oder zu schalten), dabei aber nur einen GPIO-Pin auf dem RaspberryPi "zu verbrauchen". Das kann leicht gemacht werden, in dem man den MCP23017 via I²C anschließt und nur einen MCP23017 Interrupt-Pin auf einen GPIO-Pin legt, den man auf Interrupts getriggert hat. Wenn dann ein Pin am Port A oder B des MCP23017 den Status wechselt, löst dieser den Interrupt-Pin aus, welcher einen Interrupt auf dem RaspberryPi erzeugt, welche dann dazu führt, dass der MCP23017 komplett mit allen Pins von einem einfachen Script abgefragt wird. Aktuell speichere ich den Status eines jeden Pin in einer DB, später soll er aber auch direkt via Web ersichtlich sein und eine Oberfläche entsprechend aktualisieren.

Zuerst habe ich einen Prototypen designed und gelötet, der auf einen RaspberryPi B passt; da die Stiftleiste aber gleich ist, passt er so auch auf einen B+ und wenn ich mich nicht irre, müsste er sogar auf einen BananaPi passen, was ich aber noch nicht getestet habe. Bei mir zu Hause läuft der MCP23017 so in meinem Schaltschrank und schreibt immer mit, wenn irgendwo das Licht an- oder ausgeht oder wenn jemand an der Tür klingelt. Daraufhin habe ich dann auch eine echte Platine designed und produzieren lassen, die sich aufeinander stecken lässt, somit lassen sich theoretisch 8 Boards zusammenstecken, was dann 128 I/Os ergibt - wobei ich aber aktuell nur 2 Interrupt Pins vorgesehen haben (mehr Boards gehen übrigens auch nicht, da nicht mehr unterschiedliche I²C-Adressen definiert werden können, als für acht Stück).

Aktuell bin ich noch dabei meine Installations- und Todo-Schritte alle aufzuschreiben, so dass jeder einen MCP23017 mit Interrupts zum Laufen bekommen kann. Wenn ich fertig bin, würde ich bei Interese hier auch den Link dazu posten. Besteht Interesse?

Update:
Projekt-Doku: http://raspberrypi.link-tech.de/doku.php?id=mcp23017

Interrupts verwenden: http://raspberrypi.link-tech.de/doku.php?id=interrupts

(Dokumentation ist englisch!)
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RaspberryPi MCP23017 Board (Geteilt)
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Hej guys, 
many people talk about "turn something on/off" with a RaspberryPi, but you can only very rarely find something useful about reading inputs from other systems.
I needed a solution, where I'm able to read around 16 inputs which are coming from my house (lights on/off etc.). So I finally ended at the MCP23017, a very powerful I/O chip with I²C connection, this one is perfect for the RaspberryPi, so I designed a prototype as you can see on the pics.

A lot solutions in the web explain ways how to read a GPIO-pin of the RaspberryPi in a loop and if the state changes, trigger an event. But by using just e.g. the wiredPi lib, there are a lot more possibilities like interrupts. I used the lib to activate and react on interrupts on one pin in a short python script.

The whole idea behind my project is to read many inputs by just using - or let's say "blocking" - only one of my RaspberryPi GPIO pins. This is easily done by connecting a MCP23017 via I²C to the RaspberryPi GPIO header and connect one I/O-pin of the RPi to an interrupt pin of the MCP23017. Done. If one pin state changes (either of port A or port B) an interrupt is called, this triggers the Pi and the Pi just asks the state of the complete pin-set of the MCP23017 which I (currently) finally store in a database.

First I have designed a protoype that fits on an RaspberryPi Model B and - as the GPIO headers start with the same functionality - will also fit on a Model B+. It should also fit on a BananaPi, as far as I remember (but did not test yet). I installed my prototype in the electric control cabinet of my house and it works like a charm. So I decided to create a real board, where I do not have to solder so many wires. I designed it to be easily soldered and to be able to hook one on another. By using this technique you are able to connect up to 8 boards which gives you either 128 inputs or outputs or however you set them up (more are not possible, because there are only 8 different I²C addresses possible).

Currently I'm writing down all my steps and what to do and also a step-by-step guide, so that everyone is able to use a MCP23017 and interrupts on a RaspberryPi. If I'm done, I will post it here, if someone is interested in.

Update:
Project-Docu: http://raspberrypi.link-tech.de/doku.php?id=mcp23017

Using Interrupts: http://raspberrypi.link-tech.de/doku.php?id=interrupts
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RaspberryPi MCP23017 Board (Shared)
21 Photos - View album
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