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Andreas Link
Attended Fachhochschule Flensburg
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Andreas Link

Worlds - Cities  - 
 
Today I had some time to design "Flensburg". I tried several versions but always had some challenges with the resolution when scaling it to a lower resolution with Gimp :-/. Version 2 is not so sharp designed but looking nicest on my watch so far :-). Feel free to give your comment, here is Flensburg, Germany.
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Marcin Stepien's profile photo
 
Very nice! I do like very much the Classic look of those Little Worlds! Thank you +Andreas Link  :-)
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Andreas Link

Error.... Help me!!!!  - 
 
Hej, anbody seen this error? During the day, the Client just turned into error... is there a log to check for further details about this unknown error? I was able to fix it by just stopping the client and restart it again. But anyway, I never had this before, currently I'm running version 1.8.0, build 4847.
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Steffen Krumbholz's profile photoAndreas Link's profile photoGertjan Lettink (Knurpht)'s profile photoCorné ツ's profile photo
5 comments
 
It's german you're screwed...
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Trying to buy a phone is more than sad ... as if this was not expected. Canonical is selling strong cloud services, but not having a strong shop, beeing able to handle all these requests? You could have done better!
4
Oliver Grawert (ogra)'s profile photoPaul Beeler's profile photoAndreas Link's profile photocm-t arudy's profile photo
12 comments
 
+Andreas Link
 oh, true, sorry :)
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Andreas Link

Hardware Add-Ons  - 
 
Hej guys, 
many people talk about "turn something on/off" with a RaspberryPi, but you can only very rarely find something useful about reading inputs from other systems. I needed a solution, where I'm able to read around 16 inputs which are coming from my house (lights on/off etc.). So I finally ended at the MCP23017, a very powerful I/O chip with I²C connection, this one is perfect for the RaspberryPi, so I designed a prototype as you can see on the pics.

A lot solutions in the web explain ways how to read a GPIO-pin of the RaspberryPi in a loop and if the state changes, trigger an event. But by using just e.g. the wiredPi lib, there are a lot more possibilities like interrupts. I used the lib to activate and react on interrupts on one pin in a short python script.

The whole idea behind my project is to read many inputs by just using - or let's say "blocking" - only one of my RaspberryPi GPIO pins. This is easily done by connecting a MCP23017 via I²C to the RaspberryPi GPIO header and connect one I/O-pin of the RPi to an interrupt pin of the MCP23017. Done. If one pin state changes (either of port A or port B) an interrupt is called, this triggers the Pi and the Pi just asks the state of the complete pin-set of the MCP23017 which I (currently) finally store in a database.

First I have designed a protoype that fits on an RaspberryPi Model B and - as the GPIO headers start with the same functionality - will also fit on a Model B+. It should also fit on a BananaPi, as far as I remember (but did not test yet). I installed my prototype in the electric control cabinet of my house and it works like a charm. So I decided to create a real board, where I do not have to solder so many wires. I designed it to be easily soldered and to be able to hook one on another. By using this technique you are able to connect up to 8 boards which gives you either 128 inputs or outputs or however you set them up (more are not possible, because there are only 8 different I²C addresses possible).

Currently I'm writing down all my steps and what to do and also a step-by-step guide, so that everyone is able to use a MCP23017 and interrupts on a RaspberryPi. If I'm done, I will post it here, if someone is interested in.

Update:
Project-Docu: http://raspberrypi.link-tech.de/doku.php?id=mcp23017

Interrupts-Docu: http://raspberrypi.link-tech.de/doku.php?id=interrupts
67
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Cody Erekson's profile photoMike H. (Mike The Animator)'s profile photoalain frenois's profile photoDavid Radkowski's profile photo
11 comments
 
Very Great 
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Andreas Link

Hardware  - 
 
Hej guys, 
many people talk about "turn something on/off" with a RaspberryPi, but you can only very rarely find something useful about reading inputs from other systems.
I needed a solution, where I'm able to read around 16 inputs which are coming from my house (lights on/off etc.). So I finally ended at the MCP23017, a very powerful I/O chip with I²C connection, this one is perfect for the RaspberryPi, so I designed a prototype as you can see on the pics.

A lot solutions in the web explain ways how to read a GPIO-pin of the RaspberryPi in a loop and if the state changes, trigger an event. But by using just e.g. the wiredPi lib, there are a lot more possibilities like interrupts. I used the lib to activate and react on interrupts on one pin in a short python script.

The whole idea behind my project is to read many inputs by just using - or let's say "blocking" - only one of my RaspberryPi GPIO pins. This is easily done by connecting a MCP23017 via I²C to the RaspberryPi GPIO header and connect one I/O-pin of the RPi to an interrupt pin of the MCP23017. Done. If one pin state changes (either of port A or port B) an interrupt is called, this triggers the Pi and the Pi just asks the state of the complete pin-set of the MCP23017 which I (currently) finally store in a database.

First I have designed a protoype that fits on an RaspberryPi Model B and - as the GPIO headers start with the same functionality - will also fit on a Model B+. It should also fit on a BananaPi, as far as I remember (but did not test yet). I installed my prototype in the electric control cabinet of my house and it works like a charm. So I decided to create a real board, where I do not have to solder so many wires. I designed it to be easily soldered and to be able to hook one on another. By using this technique you are able to connect up to 8 boards which gives you either 128 inputs or outputs or however you set them up (more are not possible, because there are only 8 different I²C addresses possible).

Currently I'm writing down all my steps and what to do and also a step-by-step guide, so that everyone is able to use a MCP23017 and interrupts on a RaspberryPi. If I'm done, I will post it here, if someone is interested in.

Update:
Project-Docu: http://raspberrypi.link-tech.de/doku.php?id=mcp23017

Using Interrupts: http://raspberrypi.link-tech.de/doku.php?id=interrupts
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Elba Stevenson's profile photoJeffrey Czorapinski's profile photoSaeed Amini's profile photoJoja Hurbanova's profile photo
11 comments
 
Thanks +Andreas Link 
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Andreas Link

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Hahaha... so kann man sich das ja vorstellen... :-D
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Cloud Computing haha :D

More fun at : www.improgrammer.net
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Andreas Link

I am looking for...  - 
 
Hej guys, just found this community and saw all these really nice additional little worlds. Very well done!! But I did not find any from Flensburg (Germany) :-). Probably my search just did not return the result, or noone did it :-). Maybe I just overlooked, so if someone has Flensburg, this would be really great to share.
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Andreas Link's profile photoMarcin Stepien's profile photo
7 comments
 
+Andreas Link great! Thank you :-)
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Andreas Link

Discussion  - 
 
Trying to buy an Ubuntu phone is more than sad with BG... as if this was not expected? Canonical is selling strong cloud services, but not having a strong shop partner, beeing able to handle all these requests? You could have done better!
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Terry Relph-Knight's profile photoDivided We-Fall's profile photoLydia Stench's profile photoPaul Wetzel's profile photo
9 comments
 
Frankly I don't think Canonical are doing themselves any favours with this sort of nonsense. They span the whole thing as being some trendy new way of selling when it looks to me that BQ have no confidence in any long term demand for Ubuntu phones. They used an existing Android model as the platform, so limited development costs there. Then instead of adding the phone as a standard product they put it on what turns out to be limited pre-order for delivery in a month. So at this point they don't even have any of their inventory loaded with Ubuntu and probably don't even have enough phones to meet the demand. It looks to me that so far BQ have zero investment and had little faith in this project from the get-go.
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Andreas Link

Discussion  - 
 
Hej guys, a lot is goin' on here and I'm absolutely looking forward to buy an Ubuntu phone, as the price looks attractive so far, but I'm also wearing a Moto 360 Smartwatch on my wrist.
Are there any known facts, whether there is a chance to combine an Ubuntu-Phone with an Android Wear Smartwatch? Would be sad, if this could be a showstopper :-S. Any ideas/news?
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Andreas Link's profile photoRodney Dawes's profile photogiancarlo iannizzotto's profile photo
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+Rodney Dawes This is not the point. Initially, the drivers for linux where developed by the developers of the Linux kernel. Later on, when Linux became a real alternative to Windoze, hardware developers started to provide the drivers for linux and, most important, several developers decided to support linux as an alternative to the monopolistic windoze. The same should happen for the smartphone market. It is pretty clear that several hardware producers feel too constrained by the current duopoly (well you can add also windoze, it gets three-poly) and pushing firefoxos or tizen (bada, before it).
A real open source solution is clearly needed to break this situation, exactly as happened with the pc market. But it needs to spread fast and to be able to take the place of other OSes in the existing devices. The hardware space is saturated.
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Hej guys, a lot is goin' on here and I'm absolutly looking forward to buy an Ubuntu phone, as the price will be attractive so far, but I'm also wearing a Moto 360 Smartwatch on my wrist.
Are there any known facts, whether there is a chance to combine an Ubuntu-Phone and an Android Wear Smartwatch? Would be sad, if this could be a showstopper :-S. Any ideas/news?
1
Andreas Link's profile photoPod Kalambur's profile photoAlessandro “Zaganator” Gheda's profile photo
8 comments
 
Ubuntu must be able to adapt itself and become the true seamless SO for home... I think wearable is the first step to do!
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Andreas Link

Hardware  - 
 
Moin zusammen,
jeder will immer mit dem RaspberryPi nur etwas schalten, aber selten findet man Projekte oder Tutorials, wo auch mal jemand viele Inputs effektiv aus anderen Quellen auslesen möchte. Ich brauchte nun eine Lösung, wo ich nun 16 Eingänge von meinem Haus auslesen wollte, also in dem Fall 230V geschaltete Lampen, Türklingel etc. und hier bin ich dann beim MCP23017 gelandet, einem für den Zweck sehr mächtigen I/O chip, der bequem via I²C angesprochen werden kann. Damit war er perfekt für meinen RaspberryPi und somit habe ich einen Prototypen konstruiert, wie man auf den Fotos sehen kann.

Viele der bereits vorhandenen Lösungen im Web schreiben immer, wie man einen GPIO-Pin vom RaspberryPi in einem einfachen while-loop oder so permanent ausliest und bei einer Statusänderung eine Aktion ausführt. Davon halte ich aber nichts und bin mit den Einsatz der populären wiredPi Bibliothek auch zu der Möglichkeit gekommen, Eingänge über Interrupts in einem einfachen Python Script auszuwerten und entsprechend dann darauf zu reagieren, was ich für wesentlich effektiver halte.
Die Idee hinter meinem Projekt ist also viele I/Os auszulesen (oder zu schalten), dabei aber nur einen GPIO-Pin auf dem RaspberryPi "zu verbrauchen". Das kann leicht gemacht werden, in dem man den MCP23017 via I²C anschließt und nur einen MCP23017 Interrupt-Pin auf einen GPIO-Pin legt, den man auf Interrupts getriggert hat. Wenn dann ein Pin am Port A oder B des MCP23017 den Status wechselt, löst dieser den Interrupt-Pin aus, welcher einen Interrupt auf dem RaspberryPi erzeugt, welche dann dazu führt, dass der MCP23017 komplett mit allen Pins von einem einfachen Script abgefragt wird. Aktuell speichere ich den Status eines jeden Pin in einer DB, später soll er aber auch direkt via Web ersichtlich sein und eine Oberfläche entsprechend aktualisieren.

Zuerst habe ich einen Prototypen designed und gelötet, der auf einen RaspberryPi B passt; da die Stiftleiste aber gleich ist, passt er so auch auf einen B+ und wenn ich mich nicht irre, müsste er sogar auf einen BananaPi passen, was ich aber noch nicht getestet habe. Bei mir zu Hause läuft der MCP23017 so in meinem Schaltschrank und schreibt immer mit, wenn irgendwo das Licht an- oder ausgeht oder wenn jemand an der Tür klingelt. Daraufhin habe ich dann auch eine echte Platine designed und produzieren lassen, die sich aufeinander stecken lässt, somit lassen sich theoretisch 8 Boards zusammenstecken, was dann 128 I/Os ergibt - wobei ich aber aktuell nur 2 Interrupt Pins vorgesehen haben (mehr Boards gehen übrigens auch nicht, da nicht mehr unterschiedliche I²C-Adressen definiert werden können, als für acht Stück).

Aktuell bin ich noch dabei meine Installations- und Todo-Schritte alle aufzuschreiben, so dass jeder einen MCP23017 mit Interrupts zum Laufen bekommen kann. Wenn ich fertig bin, würde ich bei Interese hier auch den Link dazu posten. Besteht Interesse?

Update:
Projekt-Doku: http://raspberrypi.link-tech.de/doku.php?id=mcp23017

Interrupts verwenden: http://raspberrypi.link-tech.de/doku.php?id=interrupts

(Dokumentation ist englisch!)
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Markus Martens's profile photoFrank Mankel's profile photoStefan Langer's profile photoRobert Sauer (papafidibus)'s profile photo
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Schön zu lesen, das es "nur" ein Updateproblem war. Nun kann ich mich bei deinem Projekt mal einlesen, Danke +Andreas Link 
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Andreas Link

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Fuckin' cool KanBan :-)!
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Basic Information
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Male
Story
Tagline
Dipl.-Inform. (FH) Andreas Link
Introduction
Hej, I'm living in the north of Germany and I'm interested in uController (ATmega), RaspberryPi, BananaPi, but also Judo and Kitesurfing.
Education
  • Fachhochschule Flensburg
    Technische Informatik (Diplom), 2002 - 2007
Links
Unser Lieblingsrestaurant aus der Umgebung! Super leckerer Italiener, freundliche Bedienung, nettes Ambiente, leicht gehobenes Niveau, also etwas schicker. Die Preise sind allerdings der Grund, um dort nicht jede Woche essen zu gehen, somit bleibt es allerdings etwas besonders. Eine Tischreservierung ist auch unter der Woche zu empfehlen, da es stets gut besucht ist!
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Abendessen, sehr leckerer Wein, auf alle Fälle meine Empfehlung
Food: ExcellentDecor: Very GoodService: Good
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
Size of the room is ok, oldfashioned furniture and an oldschool TV are ok for 3 stars. But I expect that everything is clean and working, I have a nearly stucked drain and I have fungi in the shower an some small blotches on my bed sheet. I did not feel like walking barefoot in my room. The holder of the shower is also not working. And all this is not really acceptable. But the breakfast was finally very nice the next day.
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
Sehr fettiges, gefühlt unfrisches Essen, nicht wieder!
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
7 reviews
Map
Map
Map
Very nice food, it's always a good choice to eat there - also in bigger groups.
Food: ExcellentDecor: Very GoodService: Very Good
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
etwas spießig und recht teuer, aber sehr gute Qualität
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
Super Service, leckeres Essen
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago