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Andre Richards
Works at Hospitality Technology International
Attended Middelburg Hoërskool
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Andre Richards

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Trolling as a job. 
More and more, posts and commentaries on the Internet in Russia and even abroad are generated by professional trolls, many of whom receive a higher-than-average salary for perpetuating a pro-Kremli...
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Andre Richards

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"I’m hoping the attack came from female hackers because of my blog post yesterday on the lack of women in tech jobs."
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New device allows brain to bypass spinal cord, move paralyzed limbs

For the first time ever, a paralyzed man can move his fingers and hand with his own thoughts thanks to a new device. A 23-year-old quadriplegic is the first patient to use Neurobridge, an electronic neural bypass for spinal cord injuries that reconnects the brain directly to muscles, allowing voluntary and functional control of a paralyzed limb.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140625130137.htm

Ian Burkhart, a 23-year-old quadriplegic from Dublin, Ohio, is the first patient to use Neurobridge, an electronic neural bypass for spinal cord injuries that reconnects the brain directly to muscles, allowing voluntary and functional control of a paralyzed limb. Burkhart is the first of a potential five participants in a clinical study.

"It's much like a heart bypass, but instead of bypassing blood, we're actually bypassing electrical signals," said Chad Bouton, research leader at Battelle. "We're taking those signals from the brain, going around the injury, and actually going directly to the muscles."
The Neurobridge technology combines algorithms that learn and decode the user's brain activity and a high-definition muscle stimulation sleeve that translates neural impulses from the brain and transmits new signals to the paralyzed limb. In this case, Ian's brain signals bypass his injured spinal cord and move his hand, hence the name Neurobridge.

Burkhart, who was paralyzed four years ago during a diving accident, viewed the opportunity to participate in the six-month, FDA-approved clinical trial at Ohio State's Wexner Medical Center as a chance to help others with spinal cord injuries.

"Initially, it piqued my interested because I like science, and it's pretty interesting," Burkhart said. "I've realized, 'You know what? This is the way it is. You're going to have to make the best out of it.' You can sit and complain about it, but that's not going to help you at all. So, you might as well work hard, do what you can and keep going on with life."
This technology has been a long time in the making. Working on the internally-funded project for nearly a decade to develop the algorithms, software and stimulation sleeve, Battelle scientists first recorded neural impulses from an electrode array implanted in a paralyzed person's brain. They used that data to illustrate the device's effect on the patient and prove the concept.

Two years ago, Bouton and his team began collaborating with Ohio State neuroscience researchers and clinicians Dr. Ali Rezai and Dr. Jerry Mysiwto design the clinical trials and validate the feasibility of using the Neurobridge technology in patients.

During a three-hour surgery on April 22, Rezai implanted a chip smaller than a pea onto the motor cortex of Burkhart's brain. The tiny chip interprets brain signals and sends them to a computer, which recodes and sends them to the high-definition electrode stimulation sleeve that stimulates the proper muscles to execute his desired movements. Within a tenth of a second, Burkhart's thoughts are translated into action.

"The surgery required the precise implantation of the micro-chip sensor in the area of Ian's brain that controls his arm and hand movements," Rezai said.

He said this technology may one day help patients affected by various brain and spinal cord injuries such as strokes and traumatic brain injury.

Battelle also developed a non-invasive neurostimulation technology in the form of a wearable sleeve that allows for precise activation of small muscle segments in the arm to enable individual finger movement, along with software that forms a 'virtual spinal cord' to allow for coordination of dynamic hand and wrist movements.
The Ohio State and Battelle teams worked together to figure out the correct sequence of electrodes to stimulate to allow Burkhart to move his fingers and hand functionally. For example, Burkhart uses different brain signals and muscles to rotate his hand, make a fist or pinch his fingers together to grasp an object, Mysiw said. As part of the study, Burkhart worked for months using the electrode sleeve to stimulate his forearm to rebuild his atrophied muscles so they would be more responsive to the electric stimulation.

"I've been doing rehabilitation for a lot of years, and this is a tremendous stride forward in what we can offer these people," said Mysiw, chair of the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Ohio State. "Now we're examining human-machine interfaces and interactions, and how that type of technology can help."

Burkhart is hopeful for his future.

"It's definitely great for me to be as young as I am when I was injured because the advancements in science and technology are growing rapidly and they're only going to continue to increase."

Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fEbioFpdK5E
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Awesome!!!
I want to need one of those... :)))
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Andre Richards

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You might not be a virtuoso, but you have remarkable music abilities. You just don’t know about them yet
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The growl from some best-selling cars and trucks is actually well-tuned lip-syncing or digitally faked.
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Ha, you go 'onse Charlize'
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Mozart at his majestical best.

Free on the Play Store (or at least was last week)
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Ek het iewers gehoor dat etlike bekende komponiste gesterf het nadat hulle groot klarinet-werke voltooi het. K.622 is twee maande voor Mozart se dood geskryf en is sy laaste voltooide werk. Saint Saens, wie nooit eintlik vir klarinet gekomponeer nie, se klarinet sonata (op 167) (waarvan die derde beweging een van my alle-tye-gunstelinge is), is ook dood nadat hy die sonata voltooi het.Johannes  Brahms (wat die klarnet sonata gepionier het) is dood nadat hy sy twee sonatas geskryf het. Daar is ook ander, maar ek kan nie onthou wie nie.

Hier is op 167 (3).
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pkCoRzhkXIw
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In his circles
1,580 people
Have him in circles
1,468 people
Johan Gerber's profile photo
Lynn Pretorius's profile photo
Nico Rohrbach's profile photo
Jonathan Wheeler's profile photo
Yasin Butt's profile photo
Juan Sanchez's profile photo
Onik Gharibyan's profile photo
David Swanepoel's profile photo
Marie  A. Samuels's profile photo
Education
  • Middelburg Hoërskool
  • University of Johannesburg
    B. Sc. Computer Science, 1990 - 1993
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Joburg, South Africa
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Interested in technology, design and UX
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  • Hospitality Technology International
    Director, present
  • Unisys SA, Nu Metro, E-nabling Solutions
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A favourite local place. Great setting, decor and vibe. Food is good, though somewhat expensive. Service usually very friendly, though can be slow, especially when they're busy.
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