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Andre Panossian, MD
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29 followers
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What’s your hobby? I have a lot of them. Sometimes, it’s just too darn hard to give any of them up. One of my favorite toys is this Mavic Pro drone. This thing is friggin awesome! It can fly 3 miles away and beam back crystal clear 4k images of anything. It’s great for getting creative with your videography, or for simply checking the gutters on your house or even spying on your neighbor. I even flew this thing inside my house once! (DO NOT DO THIS AT HOME👎) Whatever your interests [or, misguided reasons😜], life’s too short to not enjoy yourself. So get out there and try some stuff. PS: Who can guess where I was flying on this occasion?
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Operating is about timing and precision. Let me explain. Surgery doesn’t always mean taking your leisurely time. If we liken it to art, then the subject is a real-life human being. No more would we want to keep another human being under prolonged anesthesia than we would want for ourselves. True, I can schlog away on any surgical procedure for hours in an effort to achieve absolute perfection. In fact, my obsessiveness will allow me to do just that. But there must always be a plan…a well though-out plan. A plan that envisions the results simultaneously with the moves you need to get there. Nothing extraneous, nothing time-consuming. When teaching residents, I always tell them, “There’s a time to operate fast, and a time to go slow. Know the difference.” I find that many of my colleagues “eyeball” the results or try to get it “in the ballpark.” Others will obsess about one part of surgery and lose track of time, still unsatisfied in the end. Operating for any surgeon has to feel right. It’s a balance of moving quickly but not compromising on the results. You have to stay in the zone. How do I do that? I always review photos of patients ahead of time and formulate a written plan before showing up to surgery. I run through every step of surgery in my mind as an actor would rehearse for a play. So make sure your plastic surgeon is efficient and precise. It’s not mutually exclusive.
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