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Andre Alforque
Amateur photographer; professional problem solver
Amateur photographer; professional problem solver
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Andre's posts

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Cubs win the World Series! The sounds from East Lakeview (Belmont and Sheridan).

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Happy Fourth Birthday!
Dear Alexis, The past year you have experienced an immense amount of mental growth. From speech to emotions, you have been inundated with many difficult situations. For me, it's a harsh reminder of the black-and-white views of my own past, and the difficult...

If you are in support of the Second Amendment, we should have a real discussion.

1. What counter-evidence would it take for you not to be in support of private ownership of firearms?

2. What evidence (anecdotes and facts) in recent history can you provide that demonstrate a positive impact on society from the private ownership of firearms?

I squarely fit into the camp to eliminate private ownership of all firearms. However, we can and should have a discussion about your opinion. To have an open discussion, you and I must be willing to change our minds. To facilitate I'm ripping a page from ‪#‎onrac‬ ‪#‎OhNoRossAndCarrie‬: (http://ohnopodcast.com/investigations/2011/8/1/ross-and-carrie-go-mormon-part-2-what-no-underwear.html 44m) "If this is going to be a conversation, we both have to be willing to be wrong. And that means if I have really strong counter-evidence for your claims, you have to be willing to say, 'Okay. I've been wrong. I'm walking away from my faith.' And if you convince me that there's enough evidence for what you're saying, then I have to be willing to give up my doubts and go with it. Otherwise this is a monologue." To have a real discussion and to avoid the endless monologues on social media, I ask you the two questions above.

If you are in support of elimination of private ownership of firearms, you should think about the inverse. What counter-evidence would it take for you to be in support of private ownership of firearms? (Or you can take mine.)

We need to have real discussions about this and many other issues. And if you or I are not open and willing to change, then we have a problem.

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Progress in America
To Senator Dick Durbin, Senator Mark Kirk, and Representative Mike Quigley,

In light of US Attorney General investigations into Chicago PD, I want to know what is being done to protect both the rights of citizens and the lives of our law enforcement person...

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Praise both my child's results and her efforts. Foster an environment that's destined for success but accepts failure. Fuel the internal passion for learning and growing above all else. 

Much easier said than done but the first step is to get my bearings. 

"Above all else, we taught her to fear failure. That fear is what has destroyed her love of learning." http://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2015/08/when-success-leads-to-failure/400925/

Also, this sounds akin to employee-management issues for developers. 

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Review: Scrum by Jeff Sutherland
Quick book review:  http://amzn.com/038534645X This book inspires me to be a better Scrum Master for the team. It provides solid advice to incrementally improve not only our team performance but also my personal skills. Biggest takeaways: Work as a team in ...

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Hard work. Proper training. Practice. 

Dear Daughter,

This Father's Day I'd like to reflect on the father I am. 

First and foremost, I am not perfect. Nobody's perfect, but parents especially feel pressure, both internal and external; they are relied upon as responsible guardians of their children.

As an introvert, you will find me behind-the-scenes. While Mommy does a great job planning and executing fun activities and vacations, I'm at my best doing chores around the house, keeping your clothes and shoes fit as you grow, changing your wet diaper no matter the situation and location. I'm perhaps most comfortable behind the lens of a camera, removed from the action. I love and cherish our one-on-one time, like quick trips to the playground or occasional visit to the ice cream shop.

I completely condone and actively pursue experimental methods. I do my best to learn from failure: the method is as successful as it is painful. It's especially painful when I raise my voice to get your attention to keep you safe; you react with painful tears. But it's almost always my own failure of getting you into bad situations or habits, or a lapse in my attention. I do my best to learn from my own failures, to find effective ways to help you learn and experience the world in a safe and responsible manner.

I am more logical than most, quickly finding the B's and C's between A-to-D's. But as you grow and mature, you constantly challenge my theories. Although causing an insane amount of confusion, it continually reminds me to acknowledge and check my biases. A child's B's and C's are simple, but based off such a smaller set than adults that I often cannot find that seemingly magical path right when it's plainly in front of my eyes. This serves a reminder that other adults have different ways of thinking than I know; that even in adult life I must assume nothing.

I love you for the person you are, and will love you for the person you will be. Your growth and maturity are both my responsibility, and my own source for growth and maturity. You make me the father I am, and will be.

Love,
Dad 
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