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Anders Danielsson
786 followers -
Member of the Wealthy Affiliate Online Business Community.
Member of the Wealthy Affiliate Online Business Community.

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Here you can see the result of my #tobacco #growing project 2015. This was my first time growing tobacco in a #greenhouse. Some things I did right and some thing I did wrong. I got a lot of new knowledge for this growing season. Eventually I am going to make #snus from my tobacco.
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2016 is the year when Scandinavia’s largest #snus   brand, General, celebrates it’s 150th anniversary. 150 years later General #Kardus   Fäviken 2016 is the food creator Magnus Nilsson’s interpretation of General snus, originally created by the perfectionist Johan A Boman in 1866.
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Swedish Match has received a green light from the American Regulatory
Authority, FDA, Food and Drug Administration, to sell eight different
types of portion packaged snus in the United States.
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If you live in the north, a greenhouse can solve your #tobacco   growing problems.
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As I described in the article on how to make your own Swedish snus at home I recommend temperatures from 60° C to 90° C. But I have since then come to the conclusion that you get a lot of benefits by making your snus in the higher temperature range.
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Best rated hiking boots

If you only going to buy one pair of outdoor footwear in the next 20 years, this is in my opinion the best #hiking   #boots   in the world. In almost every #backpacking   boots evaluation you read, there's one brand that constantly get high ranking in listings of the best rated hiking boots.

I don't claim to have tried every brand out there, but if you are lucky to find a perfect pair you don't have to. So don't expect an all brands comparison review. Hiking boots comes in a variety of forms, shapes and sizes. But the type I find best suited for overall outdoor activities is the ones with a combination of rubber and leather.

This story start back in 1990 when I visited my local shoe dealer. It is a rather small shop in a small community, and that's where I live. The owner had inherited the shop from his father after he passed away. Ever since I was a child, this was the place to go it was time to buy new shoes. This as a small community where everyone knows everyone, and he was well known and trusted and known for selling quality products.

And there on a shelf, almost as an ugly duckling among all dress shoes, stood a pair of Lunghags boots. They where not very pretty and not the cheapest shoes in the shop, but they caught my interest. One thing lead to another, so after trying the out I ended up bringing them home. And I must say it was love at first site.

They served me will in my outdoors activities for many years. Under this first period, only in my free time and in weekend activities. But about 14 years ago I got a job at a ski resort and my Lundhags began to serve as my working shoes. This was the start of a over five years long period of daily use. There was a lot of walking up and down the slopes, climbing the platform posts of the ski lift and a lot of time in the repair workshop. They had to put up with oil and diesel spill, welding sparks and everything else you can find in a repair shop. So it came as no surprise that the rubber finally gave up and crack after five years of daily use.

But at a fraction of the purchase price the Lundhags shoemakers in Åre did replace the faulty cracked rubber, but reused the old leather. You simply send the old shoes to Lundhags and a week later you get them back and they are as good as new. So the service is as excellent as their products. If you care for your boots and regularly treat the leather with dressing they might well last your whole lifetime. The wear and tear of everyday use for five year is a very long time of use.

It was after my time at the ski resort I got my first dog and with that a new chapter for my shoes. Before I got the dog I was an active outdoors person, but not so much walking and hiking back then. But when I got the dog a natural progression was to walk for longer and longer distances as well as longer time spans. Nowadays I can be out hiking for up to a week or more.

One of the last trails I walked with my boots was the 90 km long Wasaloppsleden. A three day hike with my dog and a friend, starting in Sälen to the finish in Mora. My hiking companion had tremendous problems with blisters and chafing, but I had no such problems. I did have to tape the heels the last day, but that was it. The fact that I even had the same socks for the whole trip says a bit of the quality of the shoes. But at this time they where well broken in, which can take some time when they are new.

If there is any drawback to a pair of Lundhags, it is that they need quite a bit of time and distance to break in. I have read on many forums that a pair of Lundags don't really gets comfortable until you have walked with them for at least 1000 km (620 miles). And that is consistent with my experience as well. But after that they becomes more and more comfortable for every kilometer you walk.

One trick to break them in is to let them soak in water for about an hour before you take them for a walk. Fill the inside of the shoe with lukewarm water and let them soak for an hour. This makes them a bit softer and pliable and adapts to your feet a bit quicker.

I'm sorry to say that my old deceased Lundhags model is discontinued. Of the current models the Park or Husky is the ones mostly resembling my old ones.

But when I replaced my old ones I went for the top of the line at Lundhags. I bought me a pair of Lundhags Syncro High. A really fine pair of shoes, but they have one disadvantage. A disadvantage I found out on my first longer hike in them. I took them for a 60 km, two day weekend hike after I had begin to break them in.

But as this was in the end of the summer it was rather warm outside. And with a high lined shaft, it is like walking with your feet in a foot bath. The feet get so warm an sweaty so you can wring out the sweat from socks when stop for a rest. As I mentioned elsewhere, don't walk with wet feet if you can avoid it. So when I finally got home from that trip, my feet was full of blisters and chafing. But for colder weather and winder use this is an excellent choice of shoes.

So this spring I bought my third pair of Lundhags. This time I opted for the Ranger Mid, similar to the Park model. It's a mid-high classic boot with a unlined shaft. A very light and versatile boot for walking and hiking. But in my experience the sizes is a bit on the small side, so if you order a pair, be sure to order one size bigger than you normally are using.

To conclude I must say that this is not so much an attempt to review hiking boots, as an almost love affair to a pair of shoes. But it's a bit hard not to be subjective when you have owned such a pair of outstanding boots like these for over twenty years.

You can rest assured that these boots are made for walking.
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Lunhags hiking boots
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One of the best free accounting software #GnuCash gets even better if you learn how to do your own #sql   custom report using #mysql   . You don't have to rely on the pre-compiled reports in GnuCash.
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It is growing in my tobacco seed tray. It is time to separate the #plants into separate pots. See video and images on the progress on my project on growing my own #snus #tobacco
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Now it's time to plant the seeds for your own #snus #tobacco
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Guess what the chili extract used to flavor the #snus   has been compared to?
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