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Amy & Kids Co Family Child
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"Certainly, young children can be selfish, just like all of us, and some of them tend to be more selfish than others, but every day, all around me, I see young children disproving my esteemed colleague's theory." http://ow.ly/9syL30kJwCe
Unselfish
Unselfish
teachertomsblog.blogspot.com
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" I've always learned at least as much from them as they do from me and most of their lessons come in the form of this boy playing with his shadow." http://ow.ly/YSr630kCKdS
Teaching And Learning From Preschoolers
Teaching And Learning From Preschoolers
teachertomsblog.blogspot.com
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"However, research shows that the drastic decline in “risky” outdoor play in kids is creating behavior problems. By constantly hovering over kids, restricting their movement, and diminishing their time to play, we are causing more harm than good." http://ow.ly/HQ6I30kCKB2
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"Sometimes we only get it wrong once, sometimes the process is accelerated by observing others, but sometimes, for some of us, it's a longer journey of trail and error. " http://ow.ly/WpTB30kCKqt
"Ahhh . . ."
"Ahhh . . ."
teachertomsblog.blogspot.com
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- Read Aloud to Children Past Preschool -
In a Washington Post article, author Amy Joyce explains that a new study by Scholastic asserts that while reading from "Day One" is vitally important, "it shouldn't end when kids begin to read on their own." Joyce quotes Liza Barker from Scholastic:
"'As they become independent readers, we tend to let them go, but even kids in older demographics love nothing more than that time with their parents…We're blown away that kids time and again said the most special time they recall spending with a parent is reading together.'"
Source: "Why It’s Important to Read Aloud with Your Kids, and How to Make it Count" by Amy Joyce, The Washington Post, February 16, 2017 (via ChildCareExchange)
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"Play is a pure good and should not need to be defended, but ... we live in a real world where policy-makers still consider play a mere relief from serious work rather than a core aspect of the real work.." http://ow.ly/Bu1230kCKm4
A Good STEM Education Is A Play-Based One
A Good STEM Education Is A Play-Based One
teachertomsblog.blogspot.com
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"This dramatic play is surrounded then by science, literacy, math, physical education, the arts and humanities, tools we take from the shelf as we need them, learning to use them at the level at which we comprehend them in the context of the story we are telling together." http://ow.ly/jj8730kwjWc
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- A Child's View -
Lilian Katz urges early childhood programs to assess their quality from the point of view of a child. She encourages staff to “proceed by asking about the environment on behalf of the child:
- Is it welcoming rather than merely captivating?
- Do I belong in the group rather than merely have a good time?
- Am I usually accepted by adults rather than scolded?
- Am I taken seriously rather than just precious or cute?
- Am I usually accepted by some peers rather than isolated, neglected, or rejected?
- Is this environment usually involving rather than entertaining?
- Are the activities engaging rather than amusing?
- Are the activities interesting rather than boring?
- Do I usually come here willingly rather than reluctantly?” (via ChildCareExchange)
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"...We instead focus on the important part, the failure, the struggle, the process, and if we adults must say something it's more along the lines of, "You worked hard at that." That is where the learning takes place. Without the work, without the failure, success is meaningless." http://ow.ly/JIED30kwjRg
This Unhealthy Focus On Success
This Unhealthy Focus On Success
teachertomsblog.blogspot.com
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- What Causes Bullying? -
Dr. Gail Gross, in her December 14, 2014 Huffington Post article, "What Causes Your Child to Become a Bully?" provides five of the most common reasons children begin to bully others:
"I have witnessed a few different situations that describe the majority of child bullies:
1. Like Parent, Like Child
Children model what they see. If a child is bullied by his/her parent, or is being abused or treated in a disrespectful way at home, that child is likely to imitate this behavior at school.
2. The Powerless Child
Sometimes, the child that bullies is the child who feels completely powerless at home…This child may attempt to gain back power by bullying others at school.
3. The Forgotten Child
I have seen children who feel invisible at home act out as bullies at school…That feeling of invisibility may turn into anger, resentment and then bullying others at school.
4. The Entitled Child
Then there is the child who has been given too much power…Children who are given everything they want, raised without limitations and rules to follow…may believe they have a right to bully others at school, since they bulldoze their parents at home.
5. Children Who Lack Empathy
Finally, there are those children who come from wonderful, loving homes with actively involved parents who become bullies. These child bullies may simply lack empathy, like to dominate...and want power. The wonderful thing about this is that empathy is something that can be taught." (via ChildCareExchange)
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