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American Mathematical Society
428,886 followers -
Furthering the interests of mathematical research and scholarship.
Furthering the interests of mathematical research and scholarship.

428,886 followers
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Beyond Reviews blog delves into the substantial work of first female Fields Medal winner Maryam Mirzakhani, who died July 14.

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#FunFactFriday: Beautiful symmetry works by Frank Farris are based on photographs of everyday scenes and objects. “Texture maps on the spheres in 'The Alchemist’s Shelf' use quotients of harmonic polynomials with icosahedral or octahedral symmetry....” See more works in his “Seeing Symmetry” album on AMS Mathematical Imagery http://bit.ly/2uFHJPY
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Find tips on how to improve posters and presentations, by Evelyn Lamb at . Her roundup includes ideas from mathematical scientists and others, and those who are experienced or first-time presenters, audience members, and judges are welcome to comment with more advice.

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“Brent Yorgey...has a whole zoo of good looking graphics and everything is easily digestible by anyone interested in learning a bit of math.” Anna Haensch takes us on a tour of his blog at .

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Beth Malmskog reviews 'Weapons of Math Destruction,' by Cathy O’Neill, and 'Genius at Play: The Curious Mind of John Horton Conway,' by Siobhan Roberts, and chats with Richard Guy at the Diophantine Approximation and Algebraic Curves conference at the Banff international Research Station (BIRS) .

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Sara Malec provides updates on the Ximera platform that faculty can use for mathematics courses. She and the developers welcome feedback that can be used in the documentation. Read about this "cool project" on the PhD + epsilon blog at

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"Since my research area is mathematics education, I am often asked what it is like to be a math-ed researcher in a math department. Such curiosity points to a cultural difference between mathematicians and mathematics-education researchers, and alludes to a specific culture where it may be difficult to be an education researcher in a mathematics department...." Jess Ellis Hagman, Colorado State University, shares his experiences and insights.

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Beth Malmskog reports on the Arithmetic, Geometry, Cryptography, and Coding Theory (AGC^2T) conference at CIRM ("it might have been the nicest conference ever"), and passes along advice from mathematicians on how to get unstuck when your research is a struggle.

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"Mathematical inquiry often begins with the study of objects (numbers, shapes, variables, matrices, ideals, metric spaces, ...) and the question, "What are the objects like?" It then moves to the study of actions (functions, rotations, reflections, multiplication, derivatives, shifts, ...) and the question, "How do the objects behave?" The study of actions in various mathematical contexts has been extremely fruitful," Jessica Striker writes in the feature article, "Dynamical Algebraic Combinatorics: Promotion, Rowmotion, and Resonance," in the current issue of Notices of the AMS http://bit.ly/2sZKiLo. (Photo courtesy of Ryan Striker)
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"Homotopy type theory is an interdisciplinary topic...So, both mathematicians and computer scientists attended the MRC... I am most excited to see the long-term collaborations ignited by this MRC and hope they will lead to a more efficient dictionary between pure mathematics and theoretical computer science." Jacob Gross reports on the full experience of this summer's 'Homotopy Type Theory, Beyond Planarity' session, at
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