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Ammar Abdulhamid
Works at Tharwa Foundation
Attended University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point
Lives in Silver Spring, Maryland, USA
979 followers|826,060 views
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People
In his circles
176 people
Have him in circles
979 people
Work
Occupation
Democracy Activist
Employment
  • Tharwa Foundation
    Democracy Activist, present
  • SANA, Pakistan International School of Damascus, Damascus Community School (The American School), DarEmar Publishing House, The Brookings Institution
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Silver Spring, Maryland, USA
Previously
Damascus, Syria - Damascus, Beirut, Ramsgate (UK), Moscow, Stevens Point (WI), Madison (WI), Los Angeles, Washington D.C., Silver Spring (MD)
Story
Introduction

Ammar Abdulhamid is a liberal Syrian pro-democracy activist whose anti-regime activities led to his exile in September of 2005. He currently lives in Silver Spring, Maryland, with his wife, Khawla Yusuf, and their children, Oula (b.1986) and Mouhanad (b. 1990). He is the founder of the Tharwa Foundation, a nonprofit dedicated to democracy promotion. His personal website and entries from his older blogs can be accessed here.

Bragging rights
My country, Syria, is going through an existential crisis and I have been unable to help her so far. I have no right to brag.
Education
  • University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Other names
Tharwacolamus, Amarji, The Heretic of Damascus

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Ammar Abdulhamid

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This interview appeared back in late January, but I forgot to post a link to it at the time. Considering its subject matter, it will remain "timely" for years to come, even if it earns condemnations from certain quarters. 
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Good interview.....but who can control the ones who controls the islamic extremism?
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Ammar Abdulhamid

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Try as you may and must, you still cannot sugarcoat betrayal and hypocrisy. Samantha Powers agreed to join the ranks of an administration that was clearly dead-set on betraying the very ideals which she preached, and she did so with her eyes wide open. Now she and her her supporters are trying to find ways to distance her from the mess. But not even a trip to the Moon will put enough distance at the stage. She might still remain politically viable, (after all if Assad can why can't she?), but in the realm of ideals she advocated, chalk her as a hypocrite, with little possibility for self-redemption, if any. 
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Ammar Abdulhamid

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Bullocks! What cultural shock? Neither British nor Syrian culture is homogenous. There are almost 2.5 million British citizens who believe in the same value system that most Syrian refugees have. They are known as practicing Muslims, and although most of them come from a non-Arab background, there be enough citizens of Arab background, enough Syrian with dual nationality and enough cultural similarities between all practicing Muslims to make most Syrian refugees able to find communities where the cultural shock is manageable for all involved. There is also bound to be a certain social segment among the refugees that will find much comfort in the basic freedoms available to them in British society, and who will seek to maintain cordial human interaction with all around them irrespective of their confessional background. In all cases, and considering that the UK will be admitting a few thousands refugees at most, and that most of them will be busy for years to come trying to make a normal life for themselves in their new country, the possibility for any trouble-making is pretty minimal. 
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Ammar Abdulhamid

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And with this, we officially enter the era of Cold War II. This is what tolerating genocide in Syria has led us into. This is our brave new world, revisited, reinvented, rededicated. Now, we bravely plod on into another black hole of an era, armed with the usual assortment of frivolous justifications and platitudes, united only in our willingness to be foolish to the very end. 
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Ammo dumps are centralised in Russia.. What do you bet they are centralised in Syria. Mark.
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In his circles
176 people
Have him in circles
979 people

Ammar Abdulhamid

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There are a lot of rational people out there, on the right and left, whose political analysis of the various unfolding crises around us can be often astute. But at this stage, they all seem to be missing something – the underlying trend that is driving everything: the idea that when crimes perpetrated by the ruling elite anywhere go unpunished in this day and age, they invite chaos on a grand-scale, one that poses an existential threat to us all. What worked in the 18th, 19th and even the 20th centuries will not work now. No nation’s a fortress, and no people are immune from the fallouts of the myriad unfolding and seemingly localized crises. There are few truly local crises these days. Most crises are indeed global. Despite all the borders that still exist and all those that might still appear, humanity today is effectively united, and our destinies as peoples and individuals are interlinked like never before. Now more than ever, we need a truly global vision and a truly global order. And a global police force to maintain that order everywhere. It’s time we began taking the idea of forming a global government seriously. Thinking along such lines can no longer be treated as part of some science fiction or futuristic scenario, because every crises we are experiencing today, from identity conflicts, to energy politics, drug trafficking, human trafficking, and environmental disasters, harken back on this glaring deficit: the lack of a representative and fair global governance structure to which we can turn not only in times of crises, but avert such crises to begin with. But ideas without champions can never flourish. No leader on the global stage today seems willing to embrace such a challenge. This is the reason for my current pessimism. 
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The great Stephen Hawkins on why the war in Syria must end, and why justice must prevail. He says: "every injustice committed is a chip in the facade of what holds us together. The universal principle of justice may not be rooted in physics but it is no less fundamental to our existence. For without it, before long, human beings will surely cease to exist."
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Syria war will continue for a very long time... ........justice is only a very good word
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Ammar Abdulhamid

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Farideh Farhi says: “If Iran is influential in sustaining the Assad regime, then turning it into a stakeholder in the political process makes eminent sense — but not behind closed doors or on a seat in the back of the room.” … In other words, supporting genocide earns a seat in the front rows and full light of day. Why not? It worked for Russia. The message to all in the world is this: the willingness to perpetrate heinous crimes and mass murders against your own people is the key to making yourself politically relevant and will get you international legitimacy, recognition and often even respect. This is the foundation of the New World Order, which makes it no different than the Old Order. Humanity has taken a major leap backwards, and has thus earned the shame and pains of the chaos and turmoil that lies ahead. 
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It worked for the USA...it is not good and great the world we live on....
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Ammar Abdulhamid

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The people at the Economist are right of course. Irrespective of what we think about the armed struggle, violence and political solutions, the reality no negotiations can be successful unless a certain balance on the ground is created. We all know by now that all talks will involve drawing boundaries and carving out enclaves as part of a de facto if not de jure partitioning process, under the guise of a new administrative structure and a new system of governance. This has always been the reality we needed to contend with. But boundaries have to reasonable, and  someone still needs to be held accountable for the crimes that were committed and continue to be perpetrated. Assad and his cronies need to end up in The Hague. 
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The Soviet economic model centralised resources. Any partition must take account of this or a rebel state may not have access to resources and be doomed to failure. Strangled at birth by centralised economics. Mark. 
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Ammar Abdulhamid

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Immersive journalism will help you transcend geographical limitations, but it will make knowing the right thing to do any easier, and will not give conscience to sociopaths or willpower to the apathetic. 
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