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At what extent do humans affect the environment? It depends, in large measure, on the number of people in the world, says Peter Schulze and Jack Mealy. Read more: http://ow.ly/z3BgR

#WorldPopulationDay
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On average, an atom has no net charge. But at any moment in time, an uneven distribution of its electrons can induce it to become a dipole, with one end positive and the other negative (called a polarized state). Dipoles can then interact with other atoms, further inducing them to also become polarized. These short-range attractions are called van der Waals forces. 

When many atoms and molecules interact this way, they create what's called the Casimir effect. In essence, this effect explains why two parallel objects are attracted to each other even in a vacuum. 
 
This animation interprets what happens to the electromagnetic field because of quantum effects and virtual photons, to show what results when two plates are brought close together in such an environment.
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Focus stacking, a photo-processing technique, could aid in understanding the ways tiny animals filter complex sensory stimuli to make decisions important for their survival and reproduction.

View a slideshow of organisms imaged by focus stacking: http://ow.ly/z08wU
Read more about this technique: http://ow.ly/z0cbb
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"Space and time carry a cacophony of vibrations with textures and timbres as rich and varied as the din of sounds in a tropical rain forest or the finale of a Wagnerian opera."—Craig Hogan

Read more about how physicists are listening in to sounds throughout the universe: http://ow.ly/yXeol
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Is This String Theory?
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Focusing on behavioral differences in early Homo sapiens may lead to a better understanding of human prehistory. Read more: http://ow.ly/yVjEc 

Related to this, scientists are rewriting the human-evolution timeline because of new climate and fossil evidence: http://ow.ly/yVkU3 

#evolution #humans #archaeology
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All seven units of "E.O. Wilson's Life on Earth" are posted on iTunes and are free to download. Check out this upper-level high school biology textbook.
http://eowilsonfoundation.org/e-o-wilson-s-life-on-earth/

Dr. Wilson recently wrote an article for American Scientist about his personal account regarding the recovery of one of Africa’s most diverse wildlife reserves after years of civil war, as well as his suggestions for continuing to mend Gorongosa National Park’s ecosystems and for preserving wildlife around the world: https://www.americanscientist.org/issues/feature/war-and-redemption-in-gorongosa/1
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Have them in circles
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Recent measurements over the past six months suggest that Earth's magnetic field is weakening in some areas while strengthening in others: http://ow.ly/z2Xhm

Violent energetic discharges from various space events can cause havoc with satellites and power grids and impact the magnetosphere around Earth. These events are caused by the crossing and reconnecting of magnetic field lines traveling in opposite directions, but exactly how this magnetic reconnection occurs has been under study for half a century!

Learn more about this ongoing research: http://ow.ly/z2Ys0 

#MagneticField #Earth #SolarStorm #OuterSpace
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This animation interprets what happens to the electromagnetic field because of quantum effects and virtual photons, to show what results when two plates are brought close together in such an environment.
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Gabriel Rubens's profile photoRobbie A. Brown's profile photo
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American Scientist

• Astronomy/Astrophysics ☄  - 
 
 
"Space and time carry a cacophony of vibrations with textures and timbres as rich and varied as the din of sounds in a tropical rain forest or the finale of a Wagnerian opera."—Craig Hogan

Read more about how physicists are listening in to sounds throughout the universe: http://ow.ly/yXeol
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Louis Alexandre's profile photoJason Murphy's profile photoJoe K's profile photoethen may's profile photo
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Interest piqued, I sought to imagine the potentially fantastical tumult of the universe via eLISA (or another of its like), and inevitably wondered if it mightn't be more like unto Schoenberg than Wagner...
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A shocking discovery of decades-old vials containing smallpox in the National Institutes of Health’s Bethesda campus has many questioning why such a deadly virus was mishandled and forgotten.

But what is the history of this virus, and does it still pose a threat? Read two book reviews that give thorough accounts of its past and potential future: http://ow.ly/yXasW
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Why is clownfish behavior in "Finding Nemo" misleading? Watch as two animal behaviorists discuss how the clownfish behavior in the Disney-Pixar film is completely off the mark: http://ow.ly/yX5Aw

Read more about the social evolution of celibate fish in coral reefs: http://ow.ly/yX5Jb
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Are you searching for a different and engaging birthday present? Give the gift of science with an American Scientist subscription for only $30 a year for either print or digital versions! The receiver of this gift will receive six issues filled with scientific news and features as well as access to online-only content! http://ow.ly/ySBg2
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Have them in circles
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An authoritative source of science and technology news and features since 1913.
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American Scientist has been published since 1913 by Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society. It entails in-depth articles, book reviews and graphics regarding various scientific fields. In recent years, it has been honored with many awards for editorial, design and illustration quality. Read faithfully by Sigma Xi's membership of distinguished scientists and engineers, the magazine is now available on newsstands around the world, as well as by individual or institutional subscription.